12

I'm a beginner in powershell and know C# moderately well. Recently I was writing this powershell script and wanted to create a Hashset. So I wrote($azAz is an array)

[System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]]$allset = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]($azAZ)

and pressed run. I got this message:

New-Object : Cannot find an overload for "HashSet`1" and the argument count: "52".
At filename.ps1:10 char:55
+ [System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]]$allset = New-Object System.Collecti ...
+                                                       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (:) [New-Object], MethodException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId :         ConstructorInvokedThrowException,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.NewObjectCommand

Then, I googled constructors in powershell with array parameters and changed the code to:

[System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]]$allset = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string](,$azAZ)

Somehow, I now get this message:

New-Object : Cannot find an overload for "HashSet`1" and the argument count: "1".
At C:\Users\youngvoid\Desktop\test5.ps1:10 char:55
+ [System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]]$allset = New-Object System.Collecti ...
+                                                       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (:) [New-Object], MethodException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : ConstructorInvokedThrowException,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.NewObjectCommand

Cannot find an overload for HashSet and the argument count 1? Are you kidding me? Thanks.

4
  • Why the comma in (, $azAZ) ??
    – CB.
    Feb 3, 2012 at 14:25
  • i dunno, i got it from a google search. i didnt even read the article through, but at least it got powershell to treat $azAZ as 1 argument. Perhaps it is because the comma indicates separate arguments?
    – resgh
    Feb 3, 2012 at 14:51
  • It's because the comma is the array creation operator, so it makes $azAZ into an array with a single element of $azAZ - I think @($azAZ) is a clearer way to create an array-of-one-array.
    – Massif
    Feb 3, 2012 at 15:04
  • apparently @($azAZ) doesnt work, "The splatting operator '@' cannot be used to reference variables in an expression" so a comma has to be used
    – resgh
    Feb 4, 2012 at 4:36

2 Answers 2

21

This should work:

[System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]]$allset = $azAZ

UPDATE:

To use an array in the constructor the array must be strongly typed. Here is an example:

[string[]]$a = 'one', 'two', 'three'
$b = 'one', 'two', 'three'

# This works
$hashA = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string] (,$a)
$hashA
# This also works
$hashB = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string] (,[string[]]$b)
$hashB
# This doesn't work
$hashB = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string] (,$b)
$hashB
5
  • thanks, it worked. anyway, what mistake was there in my code?
    – resgh
    Feb 3, 2012 at 14:47
  • I think initializing collections was syntactical sugar that was added in c# 3. The compiler first creates the collection, then adds the elements behind the scenes. PowerShell just doesn't have syntax for this.
    – Rynant
    Feb 3, 2012 at 15:09
  • but the hashset class contains the constructor HashSet<T>(IEnumerable<T>) with 1 argument, just check msdn.
    – resgh
    Feb 3, 2012 at 16:42
  • @testgo Ahh, you are correct. I've tested some more, and found that if the array is strongly typed, you can use it in the constructor. See the example in my updated answer.
    – Rynant
    Feb 3, 2012 at 17:21
  • If you want to specify the comparer, you can do "$hashA = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string] @($a, [System.StringComparer]::OrdinalIgnoreCase)"
    – Jeff Moser
    Jul 2, 2013 at 14:54
1

try like this:

C:\> $allset = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]
C:\> $allset.add($azAZ)
True
6
  • your method works too, but i intended to use the hashset constructor. your method however, is pretty and elegant
    – resgh
    Feb 3, 2012 at 14:49
  • wait, your $allset.add($azAZ) adds all the elements in $azAZ as 1 element! something is definitely wrong here.
    – resgh
    Feb 3, 2012 at 14:55
  • Yes, the add() do this. I misunderstood your needs. The right way to populate the HasSet from the arry values is in the Rynant answer.
    – CB.
    Feb 3, 2012 at 15:17
  • @testgo You could also add the elements separately with $azAZ| foreach{$allset.Add($_)}
    – Rynant
    Feb 3, 2012 at 15:27
  • 3
    HashSet<T>.UnionWith(IEnumerable<T>): $allset.UnionWith( [string[]]$azAZ ) (the cast is only needed if the array is an object array, and not strongly typed). May 11, 2012 at 13:10

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