18

I think I'm missing something basic here. Why is the third IF condition true? Shouldn't the condition evaluate to false? I want to do something where the id is not 1, 2 or 3.

var id = 1;
if(id == 1) //true    
if(id != 1) //false 
if(id != 1 || id != 2 || id != 3) //this returns true. why?

Thank you.

7
  • 5
    because id does not equal 2 or 3? false || true || true == true – J. Holmes Feb 3 '12 at 17:11
  • 3
    1 != 2 .. this is obviously true.. lollzzz – dku.rajkumar Feb 3 '12 at 17:12
  • Then it should return false, I think? Sorry, I've been working all night so not able to think clearly. – tempid Feb 3 '12 at 17:13
  • Or vs And – J. Holmes Feb 3 '12 at 17:14
  • @dku.rajkumar the var i = 1 was just an example. I need to do work on some 50 ids but skip where id is 1, 2, or 3. – tempid Feb 3 '12 at 17:16
34

With an OR (||) operation, if any one of the conditions are true, the result is true.

I think you want an AND (&&) operation here.

4
  • 1
    Thank you. Now I feel stupid for asking this question :( I got confused. – tempid Feb 3 '12 at 17:27
  • 20
    Ha. We've all been there, trust me. – Gabe Feb 3 '12 at 17:28
  • @Gabe Okay I have a question, how I know which condition is matched? – Sachin from Pune Apr 30 '19 at 12:08
  • @SachinfromPune I think you are looking for a switch statement...w3schools.com/js/js_switch.asp – Flight Dude Apr 3 at 2:46
25

You want to execute code where the id is not (1 or 2 or 3), but the OR operator does not distribute over id. The only way to say what you want is to say

the id is not 1, and the id is not 2, and the id is not 3.

which translates to

if (id !== 1 && id !== 2 && id !== 3)

or alternatively for something more pythonesque:

if (!(id in [,1,2,3]))
4
  • The alternative checks for the index. Not if the value is in the array. Unlike in python where it checks for the value. array.indexOf(id) == -1 means that the id isn't in the array. use != for the opposite. – Neil Aug 5 '17 at 22:29
  • @NeilDesh, note the , at the start. They're equivalent – Mike Samuel Aug 5 '17 at 22:32
  • @MikeSamuel Then why is 4 in [,4,2,3] false – Neil Aug 7 '17 at 18:19
  • @NeilDesh, the trick is to have a partial identity mapping. It only works for small counting numbers so it's not generally useful. To represent the set (4) try [,,,,4]. – Mike Samuel Aug 7 '17 at 21:18
3

Each of the three conditions is evaluated independently[1]:

id != 1 // false
id != 2 // true
id != 3 // true

Then it evaluates false || true || true, which is true (a || b is true if either a or b is true). I think you want

id != 1 && id != 2 && id != 3

which is only true if the ID is not 1 AND it's not 2 AND it's not 3.

[1]: This is not strictly true, look up short-circuit evaluation. In reality, only the first two clauses are evaluated because that is all that is necessary to determine the truth value of the expression.

1

because the OR operator will return true if any one of the conditions is true, and in your code there are two conditions that are true.

1

When it checks id!=2 it returns true and stops further checking

1
  • 2
    This is important to note too; it comes in handy if you need to see if an object exists before checking a parameter. if(obj != null && obj.field == 2) – Jeffrey Sweeney Feb 3 '12 at 17:18
-2

This is an example:

false && true || true   // returns true
false && (true || true) // returns false
(true || true || true)  // returns true
false || true           // returns true
true || false           // returns true

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