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I am fairly new to unit testing in C# and learning to use Moq. Below is the class that I am trying to test.

class MyClass
{
    SomeClass someClass;
    public MyClass(SomeClass someClass)
    {
        this.someClass = someClass;     
    }

    public void MyMethod(string method)
    {
        method = "test"
        someClass.DoSomething(method);
    }   
}

class Someclass
{
    public DoSomething(string method)
    {
        // do something...
    }
}

Below is my TestClass:

class MyClassTest
{
    [TestMethod()]
    public void MyMethodTest()
    {
        string action="test";
        Mock<SomeClass> mockSomeClass = new Mock<SomeClass>();
        mockSomeClass.SetUp(a => a.DoSomething(action));
        MyClass myClass = new MyClass(mockSomeClass.Object);
        myClass.MyMethod(action);
        mockSomeClass.Verify(v => v.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>()));
    }
}

I get the following exception:

Expected invocation on the mock at least once, but was never performed
No setups configured.
No invocations performed..

I just want to verify if the method "MyMethod" is being called or not. Am I missing something?

5
  • 1
    That won't compile if SomeClass doesn't have a definition for MyMethod(string), which it looks like it doesn't. Feb 3, 2012 at 23:08
  • sorry..I edited my question..
    – user591410
    Feb 3, 2012 at 23:17
  • 1
    You're on the right track, but there are bugs in the posted code. It won't compile - casing on Someclass, void return on DoSomething. After that you need public access, then make DoSomething virtual. In short you probably have a bug in your production code too.
    – TrueWill
    Feb 4, 2012 at 1:37
  • Thanks for your response. I was setting the arguments wrong while setting up the mock method..
    – user591410
    Feb 4, 2012 at 17:43
  • "No setups configured." Could be misleading. You don't need to setup a behavior for methods that will be called. And also remember to execute "Verify" method AFTER the method you're testing should be called (so it's ok in your case).
    – Sielu
    May 18, 2016 at 12:34

1 Answer 1

362

You're checking the wrong method. Moq requires that you Setup (and then optionally Verify) the method in the dependency class.

You should be doing something more like this:

class MyClassTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void MyMethodTest()
    {
        string action = "test";
        Mock<SomeClass> mockSomeClass = new Mock<SomeClass>();

        mockSomeClass.Setup(mock => mock.DoSomething());

        MyClass myClass = new MyClass(mockSomeClass.Object);
        myClass.MyMethod(action);

        // Explicitly verify each expectation...
        mockSomeClass.Verify(mock => mock.DoSomething(), Times.Once());

        // ...or verify everything.
        // mockSomeClass.VerifyAll();
    }
}

In other words, you are verifying that calling MyClass#MyMethod, your class will definitely call SomeClass#DoSomething once in that process. Note that you don't need the Times argument; I was just demonstrating its value.

10
  • 35
    Isn't it redundant to setup an expectation, then explicitly verify the same expectation? Wouldn't mockSomeClass.VerifyAll(); achieve the same result and be more DRY?
    – Tim Long
    Feb 4, 2012 at 19:04
  • 21
    Yes it would but some people favor being explicit. Feb 4, 2012 at 19:53
  • 3
    Thanks for at least mentioning the VerifyAll(); while obvious once you think about it. I might have went for the explicit approach, but much cleaner when using the all. Thankful both are listed.
    – JGood
    Aug 10, 2016 at 20:58
  • 3
    @PlatinumAzure While setting up the mock object, mockSomeClass.Setup(mock => mock.DoSomething()); , here I'm getting error that There is no argument given. The arguments are needed for the setup or not?
    – Tejashree
    Sep 28, 2020 at 20:37
  • 3
    @Tejashree Yes, if your method has parameters then they must be specified in the mock setup, e.g.: mockSomeClass.Setup(mock => mock.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<int>())); Additionally in this scenario your Verify should specify the same parameters, e.g.: mockSomeClass.Verify(mock => mock.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<int>()), Times.Once());
    – JKH
    Mar 22, 2021 at 14:42

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