3
var sum = 0

for (i = 0; i < 250; i++) {

    function checkIfPrime() {

        for (factor = 2; factor < i; factor++) {
            if (i % factor = 0) {
                sum = sum;
            }
            else {
                sum += factor;
            }
        }
    }
}

document.write(sum);

I am trying to check for the sum of all the prime numbers under 250. I am getting an error saying that i is invalid in the statement if (i % factor = 0) I know was creating in the original for statement, but is there any way to reference it in the if statement?

  • 2
    you need to use a double equal: (i % factor == 0) – Timothée Groleau Feb 4 '12 at 6:22
  • 2
    How can you calculate anything? You just create checkIfPrime function 250 times and never call it. – dfsq Feb 4 '12 at 6:28
  • +1 for @dfsq. Yeah algorithm doesn't make sense. – Stephen Quan Feb 4 '12 at 6:52
10

With the prime computation, have you considered using Sieve of Eratosthenes? This is a much more elegant way of determining primes, and, summing the result is simple.

var sieve = new Array();
var maxcount = 250;
var maxsieve = 10000;

// Build the Sieve, marking all numbers as possible prime.
for (var i = 2; i < maxsieve; i++)
    sieve[i] = 1;

// Use the Sieve to find primes and count them as they are found.
var primes = [ ];
var sum = 0;
for (var prime = 2; prime < maxsieve && primes.length < maxcount; prime++)
{
    if (!sieve[prime]) continue;
    primes.push(prime); // found a prime, save it
    sum += prime;
    for (var i = prime * 2; i < maxsieve; i += prime)
        sieve[i] = 0; // mark all multiples as non prime
}

document.getElementById("result").value =
      "primes: " + primes.join(" ") + "\n"
    + "count: " + primes.length + "\n"
    + "sum: " + sum + "\n";
#result {
    width:100%;
    height:180px
}
<textarea id="result">
</textarea>

(EDIT) With the updated algorithm, there are now two max involved:

  • maxcount is the maximum number of prime numbers you wish to find
  • maxsieve is a guess of sieve large enough to contain maxcount primes

You will have to validate this by actually checking the real count since there are two terminating conditions (1) we hit the limit of our sieve and cannot find any more primes, or (2) we actually found what we're looking for.

If you were to increase the number to numbers much greater than 250, than the Sieve no longer becomes viable as it would be consume great deals of memory. Anyhow, I think this all makes sense right? You really need to play with the Sieve yourself at this point than rely on my interpretation of it.

  • 1
    perfect thank you. how would it affect the code if i wanted say the sum of the first 250 prime numbers instead of the prime numbers under 250? i can't remove all the 0 values and loop until array.length is 250 because that would mess up the value of the positions. hmmm – Nic Meiring Feb 4 '12 at 7:19
  • Nic, based on your new question I've reworked the JavaScript to show the new answer. However, the essence of the original answer still exist if you set maxsieve back to 250. – Stephen Quan Feb 4 '12 at 7:48
  • got it. thanks @BicycleDude – Nic Meiring Feb 4 '12 at 8:09
4
function sumPrimes(num) {
  var allprimes=[];
  for(i=2;i<=num;i++){
       var notPrime = true;
        for(j=2 ;j<=i;j++){
            if(i%j===0 && i!==j){
                notPrime = false;
            }
          }

    if(notPrime === true){
        allprimes.push(i);
    }
  }

  var addPrimes = allprimes.reduce(function(a,b){
     return a+b;
  });

  console.log(addPrimes);
}

sumPrimes(250);

You can equally use this;

3

i % factor === 0

Use === for comparison. = is for assignment. Yeah I said triple equals. Type coercion is annoying.

  • Why triple exactly? – Hunter McMillen Feb 4 '12 at 6:24
  • 3
    JavaScript supports an equality function that, when given two things of unequal types, tries to coerce them in non-obvious ways. Triple equals does no coercion, so it's a lot simpler to understand and probably does what one would normally expect. e.g. (0 == "") evaluates to true in JavaScript! – dyoo Feb 4 '12 at 6:45
1

You need a == or ===: if (i % factor == 0)

1

Here's a pretty decent way to do it. It's not as advanced as the sieve but it's a decent starting point. NOTE: I'm using ES6 syntax.

 /*
 * Sum the first n prime numbers
 *
 * @param n (integer)
 * @return integer 
 *
 */
function sumNprimes(n){
  const arr = [];
  let i = 2

  while (arr.length < n) {
    if (isPrime(i)) {
      arr.push(i)
    }
    i++
  } 
  return arr.reduce( (x,y) => x+y );

  /*
  * @param n (integer)
  * @return Boolean
  *
  */
  function isPrime(n) {

    if ( n < 2 ) {
      return false
    }

    for ( let i = 2; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i++ ) {
      if ( n % i === 0 ) {
          return false;
      } 
    }
    return true
  }

}
0

So i had to face a similar challenge and here is my solution, i hope you find it helpful:

 function sumPrimes(num) {

      // determine if a number is prime
      function isPrime(n) {
        if (n === 2) return true;
        if (n === 3) return true;
        if (n % 2 === 0) return false;
        if (n % 3 === 0) return false;

        var  i = 5;
        var  w = 2;
        while (i * i <= n) {
            if (n % i === 0) {
                return false;
            }
            i += w;
            w = 6 - w;
        }
        return true;
      }

      // subtract 1 for 'not being prime' in my context
      var sum = isPrime(num) ? num - 1 : -1;

      for (var x = 0; x < num; x++) {
        if (isPrime(x) === true) {
          sum += x;
        }
      }

      return sum;
    }
0

As per the "Sieve of Eratosthenes", I have implemented the code using JS:

function isPrime(n){
  return ((n/2 === 1 || n/3 === 1 || n/5 === 1 || n/7 === 1)?true:(n%2===0 || n%3 === 0 || n%5 ===0 || n%7 === 0)?false:true);
};

var val = 250;

let outArr = [];
for(let i=2;i<val;i++){
  if(isPrime(i)){
    outArr.push(i);
  }  
}
console.log("Prime number between 0 - "+val+" : "+outArr.join(","));

0

Here is a simple way of looping through array and implementing the sieve of Eratosthenes...

function sumPrimes(num) {
  var t, v = [],
    w = [],
    x = [],
    y = [],
    z = 0;
  //enumerating Vee array starts at 2 as first prime number
  for (let a = 2; a <= num; a++) {
    v.push(a)
  }
  //creating a moving loop by splicing its first index
  for (let i = 0; i < v.length; i) { //ensure all items spliced 
    t = v[i]; // t as prime to be removed from Vee array 
    x.push(t); // x storage of primes
    z += t //  total of peculiar primes
    w.push(v.splice(i, 1)) //tested to move all one by one
    // prompt(v) //tested that v loses its v[i] every iteration
    //= now trying to remove others using remainder (%) vs prime t
    for (let vi in v) {
      v[vi] % t === 0 ? y.push(v.splice(vi, 1)) : ""; //recursive removal of composite items by prime t
    }
  }
  return z // returns sum of primes
}
sumPrimes(250);

You generate the array beginning with 2 as first prime, You sieve the array removing items by the remainder of prime using % === 0. The you loop through the remaining array by using the next prime until the last remaining prime is pushed to the prime arrays. Add all primes to get the Sum.

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