105

I have

var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p=`echo -e $p'\n'$i`
done
echo $p

I want last echo to print

a
b
c

Notice that I want the variable p to contain newlines. How do I do that?

174
0

Summary

  1. Inserting \n

    p="${var1}\n${var2}"
    echo -e "${p}"
    
  2. Inserting a new line in the source code

    p="${var1}
    ${var2}"
    echo "${p}"
    
  3. Using $'\n' (only and )

    p="${var1}"$'\n'"${var2}"
    echo "${p}"
    

Details

1. Inserting \n

p="${var1}\n${var2}"
echo -e "${p}"

echo -e interprets the two characters "\n" as a new line.

var="a b c"
first_loop=true
for i in $var
do
   p="$p\n$i"            # Append
   unset first_loop
done
echo -e "$p"             # Use -e

Avoid extra leading newline

var="a b c"
first_loop=1
for i in $var
do
   (( $first_loop )) &&  # "((...))" is bash specific
   p="$i"            ||  # First -> Set
   p="$p\n$i"            # After -> Append
   unset first_loop
done
echo -e "$p"             # Use -e

Using a function

embed_newline()
{
   local p="$1"
   shift
   for i in "$@"
   do
      p="$p\n$i"         # Append
   done
   echo -e "$p"          # Use -e
}

var="a b c"
p=$( embed_newline $var )  # Do not use double quotes "$var"
echo "$p"

2. Inserting a new line in the source code

var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p="$p
$i"       # New line directly in the source code
done
echo "$p" # Double quotes required
          # But -e not required

Avoid extra leading newline

var="a b c"
first_loop=1
for i in $var
do
   (( $first_loop )) &&  # "((...))" is bash specific
   p="$i"            ||  # First -> Set
   p="$p
$i"                      # After -> Append
   unset first_loop
done
echo "$p"                # No need -e

Using a function

embed_newline()
{
   local p="$1"
   shift
   for i in "$@"
   do
      p="$p
$i"                      # Append
   done
   echo "$p"             # No need -e
}

var="a b c"
p=$( embed_newline $var )  # Do not use double quotes "$var"
echo "$p"

3. Using $'\n' (less portable)

and interprets $'\n' as a new line.

var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p="$p"$'\n'"$i"
done
echo "$p" # Double quotes required
          # But -e not required

Avoid extra leading newline

var="a b c"
first_loop=1
for i in $var
do
   (( $first_loop )) &&  # "((...))" is bash specific
   p="$i"            ||  # First -> Set
   p="$p"$'\n'"$i"       # After -> Append
   unset first_loop
done
echo "$p"                # No need -e

Using a function

embed_newline()
{
   local p="$1"
   shift
   for i in "$@"
   do
      p="$p"$'\n'"$i"    # Append
   done
   echo "$p"             # No need -e
}

var="a b c"
p=$( embed_newline $var )  # Do not use double quotes "$var"
echo "$p"

Output is the same for all

a
b
c

Special thanks to contributors of this answer: kevinf, Gordon Davisson, l0b0, Dolda2000 and tripleee.


EDIT

| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    This doesn't actually embed newlines, it embeds \n, which the echo -e converts to newlines as it prints. Depending on your actual goal, this may or may not do the trick. – Gordon Davisson Feb 4 '12 at 17:52
  • Thank you very much @GordonDavisson. You are right! I have then updated my answer to insert a real new lines. To thank you I have upvoted a very good answer from you. Cheers. See you ;-) – olibre Feb 4 '12 at 20:49
  • 1
    You've got a missing double quote; the third last code line should be p="$p"$'\n'"$i" – l0b0 Feb 6 '12 at 14:37
  • 1
    This prepends the output with an extra newline! – kevinf Mar 10 '16 at 0:15
  • 1
    @kevinf Thank you very much, I have just updated (extended) this four-years-old answer! Cheers :-) – olibre Mar 10 '16 at 6:37
22
0

The trivial solution is to put those newlines where you want them.

var="a
b
c"

Yes, that's an assignment wrapped over multiple lines.

However, you will need to double-quote the value when interpolating it, otherwise the shell will split it on whitespace, effectively turning each newline into a single space (and also expand any wildcards).

echo "$p"

Generally, you should double-quote all variable interpolations unless you specifically desire the behavior described above.

| improve this answer | |
  • For more on proper quoting, see stackoverflow.com/questions/10067266/… – tripleee Nov 8 '15 at 16:47
  • not working for me macOS Catalina, echo prints it all on one line echo -e or just echo. :(. – Dean Hiller Apr 7 at 22:41
  • @DeanHiller Again, the problem is with the quoting, not the assignment. You need echo "$p", not echo $p. (In zsh you don't even need the quoting. And probably never use echo -e; prefer printf for anything where basic echo is too crude.) – tripleee Apr 8 at 3:02
13
0

Try echo $'a\nb'.

If you want to store it in a variable and then use it with the newlines intact, you will have to quote your usage correctly:

var=$'a\nb\nc'
echo "$var"

Or, to fix your example program literally:

var="a b c"
for i in $var; do
    p="`echo -e "$p\\n$i"`"
done
echo "$p"
| improve this answer | |
  • The $'variable' syntax is very convenient, but I don't believe it is portable to other shells. – tripleee Feb 4 '12 at 10:33
  • 1
    @Dolda2000 Why do we have to escape \n ? – Ankur Agarwal Feb 4 '12 at 16:27
  • @abc: That depends on which escape you mean. If you mean the final, echo "$p", it's because the shell would otherwise interpret the newlines as simple parameter separators, pass a, b and c to echo as three different parameters, and echo would then join them with spaces. When you quote $p, its exact contents are passed intact as one single parameter. – Dolda2000 Feb 5 '12 at 3:10
  • perfect, I think from info echo we can see all possible escaped chars to use like var=$'\n', thanks! – Aquarius Power May 11 '15 at 1:29
10
0

There are three levels at which a newline could be inserted in a variable.
Well ..., technically four, but the first two are just two ways to write the newline in code.

1.1. At creation.

The most basic is to create the variable with the newlines already.
We write the variable value in code with the newlines already inserted.

$ var="a
> b
> c"
$ echo "$var"
a
b
c

Or, inside an script code:

var="a
b
c"

Yes, that means writing Enter where needed in the code.

1.2. Create using shell quoting.

The sequence $' is an special shell expansion in bash and zsh.

var=$'a\nb\nc'

The line is parsed by the shell and expanded to « var="anewlinebnewlinec" », which is exactly what we want the variable var to be.
That will not work on older shells.

2. Using shell expansions.

It is basically a command expansion with several commands:

  1. echo -e

    var="$( echo -e "a\nb\nc" )"
    
  2. The bash and zsh printf '%b'

    var="$( printf '%b' "a\nb\nc" )"
    
  3. The bash printf -v

    printf -v var '%b' "a\nb\nc"
    
  4. Plain simple printf (works on most shells):

    var="$( printf 'a\nb\nc' )"
    

3. Using shell execution.

All the commands listed in the second option could be used to expand the value of a var, if that var contains special characters.
So, all we need to do is get those values inside the var and execute some command to show:

var="a\nb\nc"                 # var will contain the characters \n not a newline.

echo -e "$var"                # use echo.
printf "%b" "$var"            # use bash %b in printf.
printf "$var"                 # use plain printf.

Note that printf is somewhat unsafe if var value is controlled by an attacker.

| improve this answer | |
5
0

there is no need to use for cycle

you can benefit from bash parameter expansion functions:

var="a b c"; 
var=${var// /\\n}; 
echo -e $var
a
b
c

or just use tr:

var="a b c"
echo $var | tr " " "\n"
a
b
c
| improve this answer | |
1
0

sed solution:

echo "a b c" | sed 's/ \+/\n/g'

Result:

a
b
c
| improve this answer | |
-1
0
var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p=`echo -e "$p"'\n'$i`
done
echo "$p"

The solution was simply to protect the inserted newline with a "" during current iteration when variable substitution happens.

| improve this answer | |

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