223

Here's the code I'm using:

// create a request
HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)
WebRequest.Create(url); request.KeepAlive = false;
request.ProtocolVersion = HttpVersion.Version10;
request.Method = "POST";


// turn our request string into a byte stream
byte[] postBytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(json);

// this is important - make sure you specify type this way
request.ContentType = "application/json; charset=UTF-8";
request.Accept = "application/json";
request.ContentLength = postBytes.Length;
request.CookieContainer = Cookies;
request.UserAgent = currentUserAgent;
Stream requestStream = request.GetRequestStream();

// now send it
requestStream.Write(postBytes, 0, postBytes.Length);
requestStream.Close();

// grab te response and print it out to the console along with the status code
HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
string result;
using (StreamReader rdr = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
{
    result = rdr.ReadToEnd();
}

return result;

When I'm running this, I'm always getting 500 internal server error.

What am I doing wrong?

  • 1
    First, make sure that the data you post is what the server expects. – L.B Feb 4 '12 at 23:55
  • actually, it looks like I was posting invalid data... – Arsen Zahray Feb 4 '12 at 23:57
  • For ease of work you can add json library to your visual studio too – Alireza Tabatabaeian Apr 21 '13 at 11:49
  • @Arsen - The server should not crash with malformed data. File a bug report. – jww Sep 9 '18 at 5:27

11 Answers 11

337

The way I do it and is working is:

var httpWebRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://url");
httpWebRequest.ContentType = "application/json";
httpWebRequest.Method = "POST";

using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(httpWebRequest.GetRequestStream()))
{
    string json = "{\"user\":\"test\"," +
                  "\"password\":\"bla\"}";

    streamWriter.Write(json);
    streamWriter.Flush();
    streamWriter.Close();
}

var httpResponse = (HttpWebResponse)httpWebRequest.GetResponse();
using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(httpResponse.GetResponseStream()))
{
    var result = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
}

I wrote a library to perform this task in a simpler way, it is here: https://github.com/ademargomes/JsonRequest

Hope it helps.

  • 3
    I think the json string line should be: string json = "{\"user\":\"test\"," + "\"password\":\"bla\"}"; It looks like you are missing a \ – Dream Lane Feb 26 '13 at 17:00
  • 2
    Always use "application/json" (unless for some other reason text/json is needed for example: entwicklungsgedanken.de/2008/06/06/…). Creding goes to: stackoverflow.com/questions/477816/…. – Yaniv May 9 '15 at 21:43
  • 29
    I would've thought the streamWriter.Flush(); and streamWriter.Close(); is not necessary as you are inside a using block. At the end of the using block, stream writer will close anyway. – Ruchira Jan 19 '16 at 0:04
  • Does this also work for HTTPS? – mateos May 26 '16 at 4:36
  • 3
    @user3772108 See stackoverflow.com/a/16380064/2279059. Use a JSON library, such as Newtonsoft JSON.Net, and render the JSON string from an object, or use serialization. I understand that this was omitted here for simplicity (although the simplicity gain is minimal), but formatting structured data strings (JSON, XML, ...) is too dangerous to do it even in trivial scenarios and to encourage people to copy such code. – Florian Winter Oct 25 '17 at 8:37
134

Ademar's solution can be improved by leveraging JavaScriptSerializer's Serialize method to provide implicit conversion of the object to JSON.

Additionally, it is possible to leverage the using statement's default functionality in order to omit explicitly calling Flush and Close.

var httpWebRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://url");
httpWebRequest.ContentType = "application/json";
httpWebRequest.Method = "POST";

using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(httpWebRequest.GetRequestStream()))
{
    string json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(new
                {
                    user = "Foo",
                    password = "Baz"
                });

    streamWriter.Write(json);
}

var httpResponse = (HttpWebResponse)httpWebRequest.GetResponse();
using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(httpResponse.GetResponseStream()))
{
    var result = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
}
  • 1
    What's the difference between this and the above code, am I missing something? – JMK Jun 24 '14 at 19:07
  • 12
    This uses the JavaScriptSerializer's Serialize method to create valid JSON instead of hand-crafting it. – Sean Anderson Jun 24 '14 at 22:26
  • See Jean F's answer below - should be a comment. Take care with the content type application/json is correct. – Lucas Jun 2 '15 at 2:30
  • @SeanAnderson I keep having "Unable to connect to the remote server" Error. – ralphgabb Jun 2 '15 at 7:38
  • 1
    @LuzanBaral you just need an assembly: System.Web.Extensions – SnosMe May 24 '17 at 11:58
31

Further to Sean's post, it isn't necessary to nest the using statements. By using the StreamWriter it will be flushed and closed at the end of the block so no need to explicitly call the Flush() and Close() methods:

var request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://url");
request.ContentType = "application/json";
request.Method = "POST";

using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(request.GetRequestStream()))
{
    string json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(new
                {
                    user = "Foo",
                    password = "Baz"
                });

    streamWriter.Write(json);
}

var response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
{
        var result = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
}
  • 1
    now this answer and Sean Anderson's answer are exactly the same, as Sean has edited his post. – faza Apr 8 '18 at 2:55
31

The HttpClient type is a newer implementation than the WebClient and HttpWebRequest.

You can simply use the following lines.

string myJson = "{'Username': 'myusername','Password':'pass'}";
using (var client = new HttpClient())
{
    var response = await client.PostAsync(
        "http://yourUrl", 
         new StringContent(myJson, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json"));
}

enter image description here

When you need your HttpClient more than once it's recommended to only create one instance and reuse it or use the new HttpClientFactory.

  • 2
    A little note on HttpClient, the general consensus is that you should not dispose it. Even it implements IDisposable the object is Thread-Safe and meant to be reused. stackoverflow.com/questions/15705092/… – Jean F. Nov 14 '18 at 23:07
  • @JeanF. Hey Thanks for the input. As I have allready noted you should only create one instance or use the HttpClientFactory. I did not read all answers in the linked issue but I think it needs updating as it doesn't mention the factory. – NtFreX Nov 15 '18 at 8:03
13

Take care of the Content-Type you are using :

application/json

Sources :

RFC4627

Other post

12

If you need to call is asynchronously then use

var request = HttpWebRequest.Create("http://www.maplegraphservices.com/tokkri/webservices/updateProfile.php?oldEmailID=" + App.currentUser.email) as HttpWebRequest;
            request.Method = "POST";
            request.ContentType = "text/json";
            request.BeginGetRequestStream(new AsyncCallback(GetRequestStreamCallback), request);

private void GetRequestStreamCallback(IAsyncResult asynchronousResult)
    {
        HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)asynchronousResult.AsyncState;
        // End the stream request operation

        Stream postStream = request.EndGetRequestStream(asynchronousResult);


        // Create the post data
        string postData = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(edit).ToString();

        byte[] byteArray = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(postData);


        postStream.Write(byteArray, 0, byteArray.Length);
        postStream.Close();

        //Start the web request
        request.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback(GetResponceStreamCallback), request);
    }

    void GetResponceStreamCallback(IAsyncResult callbackResult)
    {
        HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)callbackResult.AsyncState;
        HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.EndGetResponse(callbackResult);
        using (StreamReader httpWebStreamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
        {
            string result = httpWebStreamReader.ReadToEnd();
            stat.Text = result;
        }

    }
  • 2
    Thanks for posting this solution Vivek. In our scenario we tried another solution in this post, and wound up seeing System.Threading exceptions in our application, due to what I assume were synchronous posts blocking threads. Your code solved our problem. – Ken Palmer Nov 22 '16 at 16:02
9

I recently came up with a much simpler way to post a JSON, with the additional step of converting from a model in my app. Note that you have to make the model [JsonObject] for your controller to get the values and do the conversion.

Request:

 var model = new MyModel(); 

 using (var client = new HttpClient())
 {
     var uri = new Uri("XXXXXXXXX"); 
     var json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(model);
     var stringContent = new StringContent(json, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");
     var response = await Client.PutAsync(uri,stringContent).Result;
     ...
     ...
  }

Model:

[JsonObject]
[Serializable]
public class MyModel
{
    public Decimal Value { get; set; }
    public string Project { get; set; }
    public string FilePath { get; set; }
    public string FileName { get; set; }
}

Server side:

[HttpPut]     
public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> PutApi([FromBody]MyModel model)
{
    ...
    ... 
}
6

This option is not mentioned:

using (var client = new HttpClient())
{
    client.BaseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost:9000/");
    client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));

    var foo = new User
    {
        user = "Foo",
        password = "Baz"
    }

    await client.PostAsJsonAsync("users/add", foo);
}
  • 2
    This option is no longer available since .Net 4.5.2. see here stackoverflow.com/a/40525794/2161568 – Downhillski Dec 3 '16 at 0:58
  • Downvote per the above comment - since this isn't available, should probably remove the answer. – NovaDev Jul 3 '18 at 19:47
  • 1
    Thats not a good reason to downvote this answer since not everyone uses the latest versions of .net and therefore this is a valid answer. – Ellisan Aug 6 '18 at 9:02
4

Some different and clean way to achieve this is by using HttpClient like this:

public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> PostResult(string url, ResultObject resultObject)
{
    using (var client = new HttpClient())
    {
        HttpResponseMessage response = new HttpResponseMessage();
        try
        {
            response = await client.PostAsJsonAsync(url, resultObject);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex
        }
        return response;
     }
}
  • 3
    Helpful, however PostAsJsonAsync is no longer available since .NET 4.5.2. Use PostAsync instead. More here – Zachary Keener Jul 17 '17 at 19:02
  • HttpClient generally shouldn't be used in a using statement like this – p3tch Oct 31 '18 at 14:04
  • I think it implements IDisposable interface for a reason – Dima Daron Nov 8 '18 at 14:50
2

I finally invoked in sync mode by including the .Result

HttpResponseMessage response = null;
try
{
    using (var client = new HttpClient())
    {
       response = client.PostAsync(
        "http://localhost:8000/....",
         new StringContent(myJson,Encoding.UTF8,"application/json")).Result;
    if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("OK");              
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("NOK");
        }
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show("ERROR");
}
1

var data = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(json);

byte[] postBytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(json);

Use ASCII instead of UFT8

  • 1
    sounds like a pretty bad idea, am i missing something? – CyberFox Apr 24 '17 at 1:15
  • JSON can contain UTF8 characters, this seems like a terrible idea. – Adrian Smith Sep 14 '18 at 18:48

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