7

The following program yields 12480 as the output.

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char c=48;
    int i, mask=01;
    for(i=1; i<=5; i++)
    {
        printf("%c", c|mask);
        mask = mask<<1;
    }
    return 0;
}

Now, my question is, how "%c" prints the integer value 1, 2, 4, 8, 0 after every loop. It should print a character as a value. If i simply use the following program,

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char c=48;
    int i, mask=01;
    printf("%c",c); 
    return 0;
}

it prints 0 but when i change the identifier %c to %d it prints 48 . Can anyone please tell me how is this going!?

7

If you use %c, c prints the corresponding ASCII key for the integer value.

Binary of 48 is 110000. Binary of 1 is 000001.

You or them, 110000 | 000001 gives 110001 which is equivalent to 49 in decimal base 10.

According to the ASCII table, corresponding ascii values for 49, 50, 51, etc are '1', '2', '3', etc.

  • Ah! Thanks a lot for that! – Chandeep Feb 5 '12 at 11:38
  • just one thing the binary of 48 is 110000 not 110001 – Chandeep Feb 5 '12 at 11:41
  • @user975234 Oops, I had the final result in mind, so mistyped it. – Abhijeet Rastogi Feb 5 '12 at 11:47
3

It actually prints out the characters '1', '2', '4' etc.

The numeric value of c|mask gets interpreted as an ASCII code. The ASCII code of '0' is 48.

To make the code a little clearer, you could change

char c=48;

to

char c='0';

The two forms are equivalent.

  • thanks for your answer @aix .. but tell me how is the OR operation is being performed? I mean is the OR operation being done using 48's binary or 0's binary? – Chandeep Feb 5 '12 at 11:33
  • 1
    @user975234: 48 gets ORed with 1, giving 49. When you print out 49 using %c, you get 1 on the screen, since 49 is the ASCII code of the character '1'. – NPE Feb 5 '12 at 11:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.