3

After scratching my head and extensive googling, I can't seem to get this right.

I have this sample string:

test = "true sales are expected to be between 50% and 60% higher than those reported for the previous corresponding year. the main reason is blah blah. the fake sales are expected to be in the region of between 25% and 35% lower."

I'm trying to determine whether the 'true' sales where higher or lower. Using R, and the 'stringr' library, I'm trying it as follows:

test = "true sales are expected to be between 50% and 60% higher than those reported for the previous corresponding year. the main reason is blah blah. the fake sales are expected to be in the region of between 25% and 35% lower."
positive.regex = "(sales).*?[0-9]{1,3}% higher"
negative.regex = "(sales).*?[0-9]{1,3}% lower"

Which yields the following results:

str_extract(test,positive.regex) [1] "sales are expected to be between 50% and 60% higher" str_extract(test,negative.regex) [1] "sales are expected to be between 50% and 60% higher than those reported for the previous corresponding year. the main reason is blah blah. the fake sales are expected to be in the region of between 25% and 35% lower"

I'm trying to find a way to limit the number of words matched between (sales) and '% higher' or '% lower', so that the negative regex won't match. i.e I know I need to replace '.*?' with something that matches whole words, not characters, and limit the number of these words to something like 3-5, how can I do this?

1
  • You don't happen to be a Roald Dahl fan, do you? – Tim Pietzcker Feb 6 '12 at 10:08
2

You have to ensure that the words higher or lower do not occur in the .*? part of your regex. One way to do this is to use a negative lookahead assertion:

positive.regex = "sales(?:(?!higher|lower).)*[0-9]{1,3}% higher"
negative.regex = "sales(?:(?!higher|lower).)*[0-9]{1,3}% lower"

Explanation:

(?:      # Match...
 (?!     #  (unless we're at the start of the word
  higher #   "higher"
 |       #   or
  lower  #   "lower"
 )       #  )
 .       # any character
)*       # Repeat any number of times.
3
  • Hi Tim, thank you for your response. The above makes sense (despite my total ignorance about lookahead assertions), but I get an error when I try to run it (invalid regexp) as per below: Error in regexpr("sales(?:(?!higher|lower).)*[0-9]{1,3}% lower", ... invalid regular expression 'sales(?:(?!higher|lower).)*[0-9] {1,3}% lower', reason 'Invalid regexp' Any thoughts on how to fix it? – Jorgy Porgee Feb 6 '12 at 12:22
  • Thanks for highlighting this Vincent. I've tried enabling perl regexes (using perl(pattern), according to the stringr vignette) but it doesn't work :-/. Here's the example given in the vignette that fails, does it work for you? pattern <- "(?x)a.b" strings <- c("abb", "a.b") str_detect(strings, perl(pattern)) Error in check_pattern(pattern, string) : could not find function "perl" – Jorgy Porgee Feb 6 '12 at 13:22
  • 1
    Fixed this by upgrading to the latest version of stringr (0.6). This solution works better than what I'd initially thought of (matching n words). Many thanks, once again. – Jorgy Porgee Feb 6 '12 at 14:30
1

This uses the gsubfn package. It finds occurrences of the indicated regexp and then checks whether the match has less or equal to max.width words only returning the match if so:

library(gsubfn)

max.words <- 11
num.words <- function(x) length(strsplit(x, "\\s+")[[1]])

strapply(test, "(sales.*?\\d+% (higher|lower))", function(x, y) 
    if (num.words(x) <= max.words) x)

If desired we could expand the if statement to limit it to "higher" or "lower":

strapply(test, "(sales.*?\\d+% (higher|lower))", function(x, y) 
    if (num.words(x) <= max.words && y == "higher") x)

The function could alternately be written in formula notation like this (in the case of the last one above):

strapply(test, "(sales.*?\\d+% (higher|lower))", 
    ... ~ if (num.words(..1) <= max.words && ..2 == "higher") ..1)
1
  • Thank you, this is perfect for counting words. – Jorgy Porgee Feb 6 '12 at 14:32
0

Why not use a regular expression that matches both? You can then check if the last word was "higher" or "lower".

r <- "sales.*?[0-9]{1,3}% (higher|lower)"
str_match_all(test,r)
1
  • Hi Vincent, thanks for your suggestion. I would like to classify hundreds of texts based only on 'true' sales, so can't regex for both. In addition, the word 'fake' here is used to simplify the example as in reality,the fake sales aren't neatly defined that way.. – Jorgy Porgee Feb 6 '12 at 12:38
0

If you simply used this:

true sales.+higher

... it would work but for the fact that it might end up matching if later the sentence said "fake sales are higher" as well. So to get around that, use this:

true sales.+higher.+fake

If the above matches, then true sales are indeed higher. If the following matches:

true sales.+lower.+fake

Then true sales are lower. It is a bit crude of course. You might want to replace the dot with [\s\S] in order to include line breaks as well. Hope this helps.

1
  • Thank you for your suggestion. Unfortunately, the structure of the strings that I'm performing these regexs on is so irregular that I can't simply tack 'fake' to the end of the regex to solve it (in place of 'fake' could be a whole slew of different words, all meaning that I should ignore this particular sales number as 'fake'). My thoughts were to limit the number of words between 'sales' and '% higher', but can't figure out how to do that yet.. – Jorgy Porgee Feb 6 '12 at 12:30

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