246

In keeping with the "There's only one obvious way to do it", how do you get the magnitude of a vector (1D array) in Numpy?

def mag(x): 
    return math.sqrt(sum(i**2 for i in x))

The above works, but I cannot believe that I must specify such a trivial and core function myself.

3
  • 2
    I usually use linalg.norm as mentioned below. But slightly simpler than your lambda thing, with no imports needed, is just sum(x*x)**0.5
    – wim
    Feb 7, 2012 at 5:07
  • 7
    The link is dead! Long live the link!
    – daviewales
    Sep 27, 2014 at 14:17
  • 6
    The link is PowerPoint! Long live the PDF!
    – squirl
    Apr 7, 2018 at 13:40

8 Answers 8

327

The function you're after is numpy.linalg.norm. (I reckon it should be in base numpy as a property of an array -- say x.norm() -- but oh well).

import numpy as np
x = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
np.linalg.norm(x)

You can also feed in an optional ord for the nth order norm you want. Say you wanted the 1-norm:

np.linalg.norm(x,ord=1)

And so on.

2
  • 20
    "Should be a property of an array: x.norm()" I totally agree. Usually when working with numpy I use my own Array and Matrix subclasses that have all functions I commonly use pulled in as methods. Matrix.randn([5,5])
    – mdaoust
    Feb 7, 2012 at 12:10
  • 3
    Also, for matrices comprised of vectors, np.linalg.norm now has a new axis argument, discussed here: stackoverflow.com/a/19794741/1959808
    – 0 _
    Nov 18, 2013 at 9:12
131

If you are worried at all about speed, you should instead use:

mag = np.sqrt(x.dot(x))

Here are some benchmarks:

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit('np.linalg.norm(x)', setup='import numpy as np; x = np.arange(100)', number=1000)
0.0450878
>>> timeit.timeit('np.sqrt(x.dot(x))', setup='import numpy as np; x = np.arange(100)', number=1000)
0.0181372

EDIT: The real speed improvement comes when you have to take the norm of many vectors. Using pure numpy functions doesn't require any for loops. For example:

In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: a = np.arange(1200.0).reshape((-1,3))

In [3]: %timeit [np.linalg.norm(x) for x in a]
100 loops, best of 3: 4.23 ms per loop

In [4]: %timeit np.sqrt((a*a).sum(axis=1))
100000 loops, best of 3: 18.9 us per loop

In [5]: np.allclose([np.linalg.norm(x) for x in a],np.sqrt((a*a).sum(axis=1)))
Out[5]: True
6
  • 2
    I did actually use this slightly-less-explicit method after finding that np.linalg.norm was a bottleneck, but then I went one step further and just used math.sqrt(x[0]**2 + x[1]**2) which was another significant improvement.
    – Nick T
    Sep 13, 2013 at 4:02
  • 3
    Cool application of the dot product!
    – squirl
    Apr 7, 2018 at 13:46
  • 4
    numpy.linalg.norm contains safeguards against overflow that this implementation skips. For instance, try computing the norm of [1e200, 1e200]. There is a reason if it is slower... May 9, 2018 at 9:52
  • 2
    @FedericoPoloni, at least with numpy version 1.13.3 I get inf when computing np.linalg.norm([1e200,1e200]).
    – user545424
    Mar 26, 2019 at 18:18
  • 1
    @user545424 Interesting, I checked and I confirm your findings with my current version. Must be a regression? With Matlab, I get correctly norm([1e200, 1e200]) == 1.4142e+200. Mar 26, 2019 at 21:24
20

Yet another alternative is to use the einsum function in numpy for either arrays:

In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: a = np.arange(1200.0).reshape((-1,3))

In [3]: %timeit [np.linalg.norm(x) for x in a]
100 loops, best of 3: 3.86 ms per loop

In [4]: %timeit np.sqrt((a*a).sum(axis=1))
100000 loops, best of 3: 15.6 µs per loop

In [5]: %timeit np.sqrt(np.einsum('ij,ij->i',a,a))
100000 loops, best of 3: 8.71 µs per loop

or vectors:

In [5]: a = np.arange(100000)

In [6]: %timeit np.sqrt(a.dot(a))
10000 loops, best of 3: 80.8 µs per loop

In [7]: %timeit np.sqrt(np.einsum('i,i', a, a))
10000 loops, best of 3: 60.6 µs per loop

There does, however, seem to be some overhead associated with calling it that may make it slower with small inputs:

In [2]: a = np.arange(100)

In [3]: %timeit np.sqrt(a.dot(a))
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.73 µs per loop

In [4]: %timeit np.sqrt(np.einsum('i,i', a, a))
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.68 µs per loop
1
  • numpy.linalg.norm contains safeguards against overflow that this implementation skips. For instance, try computing the norm of [1e200, 1e200]. There is a reason if it is slower... May 9, 2018 at 9:53
9

Fastest way I found is via inner1d. Here's how it compares to other numpy methods:

import numpy as np
from numpy.core.umath_tests import inner1d

V = np.random.random_sample((10**6,3,)) # 1 million vectors
A = np.sqrt(np.einsum('...i,...i', V, V))
B = np.linalg.norm(V,axis=1)   
C = np.sqrt((V ** 2).sum(-1))
D = np.sqrt((V*V).sum(axis=1))
E = np.sqrt(inner1d(V,V))

print [np.allclose(E,x) for x in [A,B,C,D]] # [True, True, True, True]

import cProfile
cProfile.run("np.sqrt(np.einsum('...i,...i', V, V))") # 3 function calls in 0.013 seconds
cProfile.run('np.linalg.norm(V,axis=1)')              # 9 function calls in 0.029 seconds
cProfile.run('np.sqrt((V ** 2).sum(-1))')             # 5 function calls in 0.028 seconds
cProfile.run('np.sqrt((V*V).sum(axis=1))')            # 5 function calls in 0.027 seconds
cProfile.run('np.sqrt(inner1d(V,V))')                 # 2 function calls in 0.009 seconds

inner1d is ~3x faster than linalg.norm and a hair faster than einsum

6
  • Actually from what you write above, linalg.norm is the fastest since it does 9 calls in 29ms so 1 call in 3.222ms vs. 1 call in 4.5ms for inner1d. Jun 1, 2016 at 23:25
  • 1
    @bisounours_tronconneuse the timing for total execution time. If you run the code above you'll get a breakdown of timing per function call. If you still have doubts, change the vector count to something very very large, like ((10**8,3,)) and then manually run np.linalg.norm(V,axis=1) followed by np.sqrt(inner1d(V,V)), you'll notice linalg.norm will lag compared to inner1d
    – Fnord
    Jun 2, 2016 at 1:00
  • 1
    Ok. Thank you for the clarification. Jun 2, 2016 at 6:38
  • 1
    numpy.linalg.norm contains safeguards against overflow that this implementation skips. For instance, try computing the norm of [1e200, 1e200]. There is a reason if it is slower... May 9, 2018 at 9:53
  • 1
    @LarsH unfortunately it is not. And it looks like numpy.core.umath_tests is getting deprecated. If inner1d's existing functionality goes out into the sunset (which would be a shame) then your best bet (for speed) will be to write a parallelized function using numba.
    – Fnord
    Oct 3, 2021 at 23:04
3

use the function norm in scipy.linalg (or numpy.linalg)

>>> from scipy import linalg as LA
>>> a = 10*NP.random.randn(6)
>>> a
  array([  9.62141594,   1.29279592,   4.80091404,  -2.93714318,
          17.06608678, -11.34617065])
>>> LA.norm(a)
    23.36461979210312

>>> # compare with OP's function:
>>> import math
>>> mag = lambda x : math.sqrt(sum(i**2 for i in x))
>>> mag(a)
     23.36461979210312
2

You can do this concisely using the toolbelt vg. It's a light layer on top of numpy and it supports single values and stacked vectors.

import numpy as np
import vg

x = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
mag1 = np.linalg.norm(x)
mag2 = vg.magnitude(x)
print mag1 == mag2
# True

I created the library at my last startup, where it was motivated by uses like this: simple ideas which are far too verbose in NumPy.

1

take square of each index,then sum, then take sqrt.

import numpy as np  

def magnitude(v):
    return np.sqrt(np.sum(np.square(v))) 
print(magnitude([3,4]))
1

Given an example of a single 5D vector:

x = np.array([1,-2,3,-4,5])

Typically you code this:

from scipy import linalg 
mag = linalg.norm(x)

For different types of input (matrices or a stack (batch) of 5D vectors) check the reference documentation which describes the API consistently. https://numpy.org/doc/stable/reference/generated/numpy.linalg.norm.html

OR

If the virtual environment is fresh and scipy is missing just type

mag = np.sqrt(x.dot(x))
0

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