8

I'm a bit confused about modifying tuple members. The following doesn't work:

>>> thing = (['a'],)
>>> thing[0] = ['b']
TypeError: 'tuple' object does not support item assignment
>>> thing
(['a'],)

But this does work:

>>> thing[0][0] = 'b'
>>> thing
(['b'],)

Also works:

>>> thing[0].append('c')
>>> thing
(['b', 'c'],)

Doesn't work, and works (huh?!):

>>> thing[0] += 'd'
TypeError: 'tuple' object does not support item assignment
>>> thing
(['b', 'c', 'd'],)

Seemingly equivalent to previous, but works:

>>> e = thing[0]
>>> e += 'e'
>>> thing
(['b', 'c', 'd', 'e'],)

So what exactly are the rules of the game, when you can and can't modify something inside a tuple? It seems to be more like prohibition of using the assignment operator for tuple members, but the last two cases are confusing me.

9

You can always modify a mutable value inside a tuple. The puzzling behavior you see with

>>> thing[0] += 'd'

is caused by +=. The += operator does in-place addition but also an assignment — the in-place addition works just file, but the assignment fails since the tuple is immutable. Thinking of it like

>>> thing[0] = thing[0] + 'd'

explains this better. We can use the dis module from the standard library to look at the bytecode generated from both expressions. With += we get an INPLACE_ADD bytecode:

>>> def f(some_list):
...     some_list += ["foo"]
... 
>>> dis.dis(f)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (some_list)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 ('foo')
              6 BUILD_LIST               1
              9 INPLACE_ADD         
             10 STORE_FAST               0 (some_list)
             13 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             16 RETURN_VALUE        

With + we get a BINARY_ADD:

>>> def g(some_list):
...     some_list = some_list + ["foo"]
>>> dis.dis(g)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (some_list)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 ('foo')
              6 BUILD_LIST               1
              9 BINARY_ADD          
             10 STORE_FAST               0 (some_list)
             13 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             16 RETURN_VALUE        

Notice that we get a STORE_FAST in both places. This is the bytecode that fails when you try to store back into a tuple — the INPLACE_ADD that comes just before works fine.

This explains why the "Doesn't work, and works" case leaves the modified list behind: the tuple already has a reference to the list:

>>> id(thing[0])
3074072428L

The list is then modified by the INPLACE_ADD and the STORE_FAST fails:

>>> thing[0] += 'd'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'tuple' object does not support item assignment

So the tuple still has a reference to the same list, but the list has been modified in-place:

>>> id(thing[0])
3074072428L
>>> thing[0] 
['b', 'c', 'd']
  • Why isn't thing[0] += 'e' equivalent to thing[0] = thing[0] + ['e'], which would construct the correct list then lose it when assignment fails? That is, if it simplifies down to .extend('e'), why the tmp at all? Why not just thing[0].extend('e')? – Chris Lutz Feb 7 '12 at 7:31
  • @ChrisLutz: yeah, good point. You're completely right: it's not equivalent to thing[0].extend('e') but to thing[0] = thing[0] + 'e' like you suggest. I've fixed the answer to say that. – Martin Geisler Feb 7 '12 at 8:27
  • I still don't understand case I've labelled "Doesn't work, and works". I would expect it to either a) work, with the list modified or b) raise exception and leaving the list unmodified. How does it fail with exception AND modify the value? – wim Feb 8 '12 at 4:11
  • 1
    @wim: I've updated the answer to emphasise what goes wrong: first INPLACE_ADD is executed (this mutates the list) and then STORE_FAST is executed (this fails when you try to assign to a tuple). – Martin Geisler Feb 9 '12 at 8:40
2

You can't modify the tuple, but you can modify the contents of things contained within the tuple. Lists (along with sets, dicts, and objects) are a reference type and thus the "thing" in the tuple is just a reference - the actual list is a mutable object which is pointed to by that reference and can be modified without changing the reference itself.

( + ,)       <--- your tuple (this can't be changed)
  |
  |
  v
 ['a']       <--- the list object your tuple references (this can be changed)

After thing[0][0] = 'b':

( + ,)       <--- notice how the contents of this are still the same
  |
  |
  v
 ['b']       <--- but the contents of this have changed

After thing[0].append('c'):

( + ,)       <--- notice how this is still the same
  |
  |
  v
 ['b','c']   <--- but this has changed again

The reason why += errors is that it's not completely equivalent to .append() - it actually does an addition and then an assignment (and the assignment fails), rather than merely appending in-place.

1

You cannot replace an element of a tuple, but you can replace the entire contents of the element. This will work:

thing[0][:] = ['b']

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