36

I have seen this question on SO:

What are the most common font-sizes for H1-H6 tags with this being the recommended font sizes fo H tags:

h1 { font-size: 2em; }
h2 { font-size: 1.5em; }
h3 { font-size: 1.17em; }
h5 { font-size: .83em; }
h6 { font-size: .75em; }

Is there a 'best practice' for these for mobile phones? -say iphone screen size?

3
  • The only recommendation I can give is that yes, ems are the way to go, not pixels as the other question suggests. But it depends. For instance if the text in a h1 is large (like, an entire sentence) I find 2em a bit too overwhelming and I'd go with a smaller size.
    – Mr Lister
    Feb 7 '12 at 10:40
  • 4
    Well you know that em is a relative measure right? So 1em without a base means nothing. Feb 7 '12 at 10:42
  • @FlorianRachor Not true, sorry.
    – Mr Lister
    Feb 7 '12 at 11:03
50

The font sizes in your question are an example of what ratio each header should be in comparison to each other, rather than what size they should be themselves (in pixels).

So in response to your question "Is there a 'best practice' for these for mobile phones? - say iphone screen size?", yes there probably is - but you might find what someone says is "best practice" does not work for your layout.

However, to help get you on the right track, this article about building responsive layouts provides a good example of how to calculate the base font-size in pixels in relation to device screen sizes.

The suggested font-sizes for screen resolutions suggested from that article are as follows:

@media (min-width: 858px) {
    html {
        font-size: 12px;
    }
}
 
@media (min-width: 780px) {
    html {
        font-size: 11px;
    }
}
 
@media (min-width: 702px) {
    html {
        font-size: 10px;
    }
}
 
@media (min-width: 624px) {
    html {
        font-size: 9px;
    }
}
 
@media (max-width: 623px) {
    html {
        font-size: 8px;
    }
}
5
  • 7
    it says use rem instead of em. em inherits from parent, while rem is directly from html..as can be seen here in the fiddle i made jsfiddle.net/5qb4x Aug 16 '13 at 20:55
  • 2
    I would rather say that going under 12px is already bad. Well, even 8px is readable, but it's not as easy to read as 12px or similar. User should see text in the size, that will give him chance to read text without scaling or holding phone closer to eyes. Content is this what customers looking for on our website, not white background with small letters ;)
    – instead
    May 6 '15 at 23:20
  • Another reason why anything < 12px is bad is because some browsers (like Chrome with a Chinese language pack) will render anything smaller than 12px as 12px. For that reason I would never go under 12px, and take anyone who tells you to do so with a grain of salt.
    – nikk wong
    Mar 14 '16 at 21:25
  • media query is good, you can set own rules based on actual media width
    – andyCao
    Oct 28 '16 at 8:06
  • 4
    It should be 624 instead of 724 px.
    – Rodrigo
    Apr 30 '20 at 15:44
8

Based on my comment to the accepted answer, there are a lot potential pitfalls that you may encounter by declaring font-sizes smaller than 12px. By declaring styles that lead to computed font-sizes of less than 12px, like so:

html {
  font-size: 8px;
}
p {
  font-size: 1.4rem;
}
// Computed p size: 11px.

You'll run into issues with browsers, like Chrome with a Chinese language pack that automatically renders any font sizes computed under 12px as 12px. So, the following is true:

h6 {
    font-size: 12px;
}
p {
   font-size: 8px;
}
// Both render at 12px in Chrome with a Chinese language pack.   
// How unpleasant of a surprise.

I would also argue that for accessibility reasons, you generally shouldn't use sizes under 12px. You might be able to make a case for captions and the like, but again--prepare to be surprised under some browser setups, and prepared to make your grandma squint when she's trying to read your content.

I would instead, opt for something like this:

h1 {
    font-size: 2.5rem;
}

h2 {
    font-size: 2.25rem;
}

h3 {
    font-size: 2rem;
}

h4 {
    font-size: 1.75rem;
}

h5 {
    font-size: 1.5rem;
}

h6 {
    font-size: 1.25rem;
}

p {
    font-size: 1rem;
}

@media (max-width: 480px) {
    html {
        font-size: 12px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 480px) {
    html {
        font-size: 13px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 768px) {
    html {
        font-size: 14px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 992px) {
    html {
        font-size: 15px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 1200px) {
    html {
        font-size: 16px;
    }
}

You'll find that tons of sites that have to focus on accessibility use rather large font sizes, even for p elements.

As a side note, setting margin-bottom equal to the font-size usually also tends to be attractive, i.e.:

h1 {
    font-size: 2.5rem;
    margin-bottom: 2.5rem;
}

Good luck.

2
  • How do I force font sizes computed under 12px then? If I set it to 10px I want it to be 10px not 12px.?
    – MrCalvin
    May 1 '16 at 10:09
  • In some browsers, you can not. I think the Chinese version of Chrome does this because Chinese text < 12px is complete unlegible. I'm not sure about other distro's of chrome, but I'd assume it's safe to say it's possible that other languages also have this 'minimum size' set. For that reason, and for accessibility reasons in general, it's a good idea to keep minimum sizes at 12px. It's not a bad idea anyways. Companies like google put a lot of research into accessibility and they rarely use font sizes < 12px.
    – nikk wong
    May 24 '16 at 19:25
1

The whole thing to em is, that the size is relative to the base. So I would say you could keep the font sizes by altering the base.

Example: If you base is 16px, and p is .75em (which is 12px) you would have to raise the base to about 20px. In this case p would then equal about 15px which is the minimum I personally require for mobile phones.

6
  • 1
    But this isn't about base font size. If it was, I'd say make it depend on the screen width. You know, with an @media rule. This is about the header-to-normal ratio, and then you can't do better than use ems.
    – Mr Lister
    Feb 7 '12 at 10:42
  • Sorry but you disagree with yourself. "Header-to-normal ratio" - well what is the normal size? Exactly the base, which is measured in px, because the media consists of pixels. If you want to use em, you have to set a base (16px is standard in most browsers). Feb 7 '12 at 10:50
  • You don't understand the question then. The question isn't about what the best, let's say, body size is. It's about the size of headers, relative to the normal size. And em is not relative to some undefined size that you have to set first, it's relative to the size in the parent (body in this case). If you don't set a size for the body, the browser will use its default. So it will always be known to the browser how large an em is in pixels, even if you don't force a base size on the user.
    – Mr Lister
    Feb 7 '12 at 11:02
  • 1
    I'm sorry but I keep the feeling you don't understand the em concept. You basically write the same thing as I but keep telling me I'm wrong. If you don't set a size the browser will use 16px. If the h1-h6 sizes are best p/h ratio on screen, it's most likely the best for a mobile phone. You just adjust the base according to the media. The whole thing about em is relative size to a base. So you change the base and not the ratio. Feb 7 '12 at 11:10
  • 1
    @FlorianRachor "If you don't set a size the browser will use 16px." That's not entirely factual. While many browsers may have something around 16px for a factory default, the user can change this to a size of their choice. Anyway, my response was to your saying "1em without a base means nothing", which didn't make sense. There is always a "base" size, even if you don't specify anything in the webpage, so an em is always a specific number of pixels in a specific situation. It's relative to the font size in the parent, not to some "base" size that must be set explicitly in order to have a value.
    – Mr Lister
    Feb 7 '12 at 12:37

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