0

I've created a class in C++ to deal with arrays of 0s and 1s. In private attributes I have a size, a type and an array of integer for the size specified.

My problem is that the values in the array is being modified every time I call the constructor again. In more detailled, I create a first object with the constructor, then a second one and doing this modifies the first one!

I've tried to play around with pointers, the new operator, const pointers to const object, nothing works! Idependently of the size of array I chose, it's always the third, then the sixth, then the ninth, etc value of the array that is modified to the value of the size. any suggestion appreciated.

some extracts from my code:

class SArray
{
private:
  int SArray_Size;
  int DType;
  int Table[];
public:
  //complete constructor
  SArray::SArray(const int& tsize, const int& ttype)
  {
    SArray_Size = tsize;
    DType = ttype;
    if (ttype == 0) //random array with integer values between 0 and 1
    {
      for (int i = 0; i < getSize(); i++) 
      {
        Table[i] = rand() % 2;
      }
    }
    if (ttype == 1) //default array with only 1s
    {
      for (int i = 0; i < getSize(); i++)
      {
        Table[i] = 1;
      }
    }
  }

};

int main()
{
  const int NbRes = 15;
  //reset the random number generator
  srand(time(0));
  const SArray test3(NbRes,1);
  (test3).print();
  const SArray test1(NbRes,1);
  (test1).print();
  (test3).print();
  return 0;
}
2
  • Could you post a complete test-case? It's difficult to guess what the problem is if we can't see the relevant code. Commented Feb 7, 2012 at 12:24
  • Not really a bug, but why do you write (test3).print(); instead of just test3.print(); ? The extra braces look very weird to me ... Commented Feb 7, 2012 at 12:28

2 Answers 2

3

The culprit is int Table[] - you have not specified how large your table is.

You should really replace it with std::vector<int> Table; and initialize it with tsize.

For instance:

#include <vector>

class SArray
{
  private:
    int DType;
    std::vector<int> Table;
  public:
    const size_t getSize() const { return Table.size(); }
  public:
    SArray::SArray(const int tsize, const int ttype) :
      DType(ttype), Table(tsize)
    {
      int i, n = getSize();
      switch( ttype )
      {
        case 0:
          for (i = 0; i < n; ++i) 
            Table[i] = rand() % 2;
          break;
        case 1:
          for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            Table[i] = 1;
          break;
      }
    }
 };
0
2

You must allocate memory for "Table". For example:

SArray::SArray(const int& tsize, const int& ttype)
{
    SArray_Size = tsize;
    DType = ttype;
    Table= new int[tsize];
    ...

Don't forget to free it in destructor.

3
  • Or even better, you use a std::vector<int>
    – KillianDS
    Commented Feb 7, 2012 at 12:28
  • @OliCharlesworth: absolutely, my mistake. So there is something missing somewhere...
    – pagra
    Commented Feb 7, 2012 at 12:31
  • thank you! I realise the mistake now. I read somewhere that arrays are evil, it might be true! :-) Commented Feb 8, 2012 at 6:05

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