12

I have the below struct

struct node{
   float val;
   int count;

}

I have several objects of this struct. Now, I want to insert these objects into a priority queue of STL such that the priority queue orders the items by count. Any idea on how to do so? Preferably a min heap is preferred. I know how to do the above for primitive data types, not structs

18

Overload the < operator:

bool operator<(const node& a, const node& b) {
  return a.count > b.count;
}

I have reversed the comparison to achieve min heap wihtout passing extra arguments to the priority queue. Now you use it like this:

priority_queue<node> pq;
...

Edit: take a look at this post which seems to be almost exact duplicate: STL Priority Queue on custom class

  • what if i push pointers in my queue. that is node*. does this change. Can you explain why do you have to override the < operator and how this workds – Programmer Feb 7 '12 at 17:26
  • 1
    The priority queue is a templated class(let's say it's template<class T> priority_queue). Internally it uses the < operator for comparison of the elements pushed in it. So if you have not defined this operator for the class you are pushing in a priority_queue you will get an compilation error. For the question about pointers take a look at the edit of my comment. – Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 8 '12 at 7:14
  • Shouldn't it be return a.count < b.count;? – 425nesp Oct 27 '14 at 1:18
  • 2
    @425nesp see in my answer: I have reversed the comparison to achieve min heap wihtout passing extra arguments to the priority queue. – Ivaylo Strandjev Oct 27 '14 at 8:51
  • @IvayloStrandjev Operator should never be overload in such reversed way. Define overloaded operators only if their meaning is obvious, unsurprising, and consistent with the corresponding built-in operators. - from Google C++ style guide. – Dejan Nov 28 '18 at 18:15
11
#include <iostream>
#include <queue>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
class Boxer{
    public:
        string name;
        int strength;
};
struct Comp{
    bool operator()(const Boxer& a, const Boxer& b){
        return a.strength<b.strength;
    }
};
int main(){
    Boxer boxer[3];
    boxer[0].name="uday", boxer[0].strength=23;
    boxer[1].name="manoj", boxer[1].strength=33;
    boxer[2].name="rajiv", boxer[2].strength=53;

    priority_queue< Boxer, vector<Boxer>, Comp> pq;
    pq.push(boxer[0]);
    pq.push(boxer[1]);
    pq.push(boxer[2]);
    Boxer b = pq.top();
    cout<<b.name;
    //result is Rajiv

    return 0;
}
  • Thanks for sharing. This is really useful to get the complete picture. – aLearner Feb 12 '14 at 9:33
  • why pass vector<Boxer>? and why are you passing a struct instead of a function? and why are you overriding the () operator instead of <? and @mohit , I wouldn't call it a good answer if it has no explanation, especially if it's asked by a person who is obviously new to c++ – Oğuz Yıldız Feb 1 '16 at 7:46
  • Hi! I don't understand why do we need to provide the second argument, "vector<Boxer>", I mean wouldn't it work even without that? – aroma May 26 '17 at 11:22
6
  1. Using greater as comparison function you can use priority queue as min heap,

    #include <bits/stdc++.h>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    int main()
    {
        priority_queue<int,vector<int>,greater<int> >pq;
        pq.push(1);
        pq.push(2);
        pq.push(3);
    
        while(!pq.empty())
        {
            int r = pq.top();
            pq.pop();
            cout << r << " ";
        }
        return 0;
    }
    
  2. Inserting value by changing their sign (using minus (-) for positive number and using plus (+) for negative number we can use priority queue in reversed order.

    int main()
    {
        priority_queue<int>pq2;
        pq2.push(-1); //for +1
        pq2.push(-2); //for +2
        pq2.push(-3); //for +3
        pq2.push(4);  //for -4
    
        while(!pq2.empty())
        {
            int r = pq2.top();
            pq2.pop();
            cout << -r << " ";
        }
    
        return 0;
    }
    
  3. For custom data types or classes we need a to tell priority queue a way of knowing on which order it will sort our data.

    struct compare
    {
        bool operator()(const int & a, const int & b)
        {
            return a>b;
        }
    };
    
    int main()
    {
    
        priority_queue<int,vector<int>,compare> pq;
        pq.push(1);
        pq.push(2);
        pq.push(3);
    
        while(!pq.empty())
        {
            int r = pq.top();
            pq.pop();
            cout << r << " ";
        }
    
        return 0;
    }
    
  4. For custom structure or class you can use priority_queue in any order. Suppose, we want to sort people in descending order according to their salary and if tie then according to their age.

    struct people
    {
        int age,salary;
    };
    struct compare {
        bool operator()(const people & a, const people & b)
        {
            if(a.salary==b.salary)
            {
                return a.age>b.age;
            } else {
                return a.salary>b.salary;
            }
        }
    };
    
    int main()
    {
        priority_queue<people,vector<people>,compare> pq;
        people person1,person2,person3;
        person1.salary=100;
        person1.age = 50;
        person2.salary=80;
        person2.age = 40;
        person3.salary = 100;
        person3.age=40;
    
        pq.push(person1);
        pq.push(person2);
        pq.push(person3);
    
        while(!pq.empty())
        {
            people r = pq.top();
            pq.pop();
            cout << r.salary << " " << r.age << endl;
        }
    
  5. Same result can be obtained by operator overloading :

    struct people
    {
        int age,salary;
    
        bool operator< (const people & p) const
        {
            if(salary==p.salary)
            {
                return age>p.age;
            } else {
                return salary>p.salary;
            }
        }
    };
    

In main function :

    priority_queue<people> pq;
    people person1,person2,person3;
    person1.salary=100;
    person1.age = 50;
    person2.salary=80;
    person2.age = 40;
    person3.salary = 100;
    person3.age=40;

    pq.push(person1);
    pq.push(person2);
    pq.push(person3);

    while(!pq.empty())
    {
        people r = pq.top();
        pq.pop();
        cout << r.salary << " " << r.age << endl;
    }
2

You need to provide operator< for that struct. Something like:

bool operator<(node const& x, node const& y) {
    return x.count < y.count;
}

Now you can use a priority queue from the standard library.

0

We can define user defined comparator class:

Code Snippet :

#include<bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;

struct man
{
  string name;
  int priority; 
};

class comparator
{
 public:
   bool operator()(const man& a, const man& b)
   {
        return a.priority<b.priority;
   }
};

int main()
{
   man arr[5];
   priority_queue<man, vector<man>, comparator> pq;

   for(int i=0; i<3; i++)
   {
     cin>>arr[i].name>>arr[i].priority;
     pq.push(arr[i]);
   }

   while (!pq.empty())
   {
     cout<<pq.top().name<<" "<<pq.top().priority;
     pq.pop();
     cout<<endl;
   }
   return 0;
}
0

Since C++11, you can write

auto comparer = [](const auto& a, const auto& b) {
    return a.priority < b.priority;
};
std::priority_queue<Item, std::vector<Item>, decltype(comparer)> queue(comparer);

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