240

I have a DIV and I would like to put a pattern as background. This pattern is gray. So to make it a little more nice, I would like to put a light transparent color "layer" over. Below is what I tried but which did not work. Is there a way to put the colored layer over the background image?

Here's my CSS:

background: url('../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png');
background-color: rgba(248, 247, 216, 0.7);

15 Answers 15

259

Here it is:

.background {
    background:url('../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png');
    position: relative;
}

.layer {
    background-color: rgba(248, 247, 216, 0.7);
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

HTML for this:

<div class="background">
    <div class="layer">
    </div>
</div>

Of course you need to define a width and height to the .background class, if there are no other elements inside of it

6
  • 17
    there is absolute no reason for a relative and absolute positioning. – Sven Bieder Feb 7 '12 at 20:08
  • 2
    Ah yes, of course, I kinda was into the modal popup, don't know why. You're answer is of course cleaner and easier. – Johannes Klauß Feb 7 '12 at 20:11
  • @JohannesKlauß how come his answer is cleaner and easier? it is not working, at least for my case. – Danny22 Jun 4 '15 at 18:53
  • 2
    I think this is cleaner. The box-shadow has issues if content not longer than bg etc. – Jack Feb 2 '17 at 9:02
  • 1
    Not my favorite answer. Josh Crozier's answer will help you do things without additional elements, and BevansDesign can help you achieve everything without any pseudoelement (which would be necessary if you want to use inline css for CMS reason). – Victoria Ruiz Aug 17 '20 at 19:45
356

I know this is a really old thread, but it shows up at the top in Google, so here's another option.

This one is pure CSS, and doesn't require any extra HTML.

box-shadow: inset 0 0 0 1000px rgba(0,0,0,.2);

There are a surprising number of uses for the box-shadow feature.

6
  • 1
    As much as this is an amazing possibility, its only supported in IE 9+ which means ignoring 1,8% of the web users as of Oct 2014. – Michael De Keyser Nov 14 '14 at 0:54
  • 3
    Very nice! Is this a good idea performance-wise? Haven't looked into the performance of box-shadow – Miguel Stevens Nov 25 '14 at 15:03
  • 22
    Nice hack but a big performance killer. This will slow down every mobile device. Box shadow causes performance problems on mobile devices. It's better to avoid it especially if there are other way to go. – Hexodus Apr 11 '15 at 15:05
  • 7
    Just an update a couple years later: I currently use this method all over kotulas.com, and there's no significant slowdown that I've noticed. It could become an issue if you're using it on hundreds of elements, but even on a page with 150+ images, it's not an issue for me. (And this is on a work computer.) Naturally, you'll want to test it ahead of time to make sure that it's right for you. And as for old browser compatibility, since the fallback is that the user doesn't see a hover-over effect (with no other problems), I'm ok with that. – BevansDesign Mar 3 '17 at 18:56
  • 10
    I personally use it like this: box-shadow: inset 0 0 0 100vmax rgba(0, 0, 0, .2). – Neurotransmitter Dec 4 '17 at 11:18
169

From CSS-Tricks... there is a one step way to do this without z-indexing and adding pseudo elements-- requires linear gradient which I think means you need CSS3 support

.tinted-image {
  background-image: 
    /* top, transparent red */
    linear-gradient(
      rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.45), 
      rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.45)
    ),
    /* your image */
    url(image.jpg);
}
6
  • This worked great, you can't animate gradients however if you wanted to pulse a color, don't think that's possible with any method. – sricks Sep 9 '15 at 21:48
  • 1
    I had background-size:cover; and background-position:center center; set on this element. This seems to cancel that effect. – Solace Nov 3 '15 at 13:39
  • Working great with a background-size:cover; after. On chrome at least. – davidbonachera Nov 7 '16 at 3:38
  • Definitely the most convenient way to tint background patterns and images but be careful to check it with Chrome and others, especially if applied to the body tag, chrome will scroll with a tonne of lag. FF handles it fine. – Hastig Zusammenstellen Nov 20 '16 at 7:26
  • 4
    Am I the only one old enough to get the Tom reference? – Abram Sep 4 '18 at 20:01
57

You can also use a linear gradient and an image: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/RPweox

.background{
  background: linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,.5), rgba(0,0,0,.5)),
    url('http://www.imageurl.com');
}

This is because the linear gradient function creates an Image which is added to the background stack. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/linear-gradient

0
33

Try this. Works for me.

.background {
    background-image: url(images/images.jpg);
    display: block;
    position: relative;
}

.background::after {
    content: "";
    background: rgba(45, 88, 35, 0.7);
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    z-index: 1;
}

.background > * {
    z-index: 10;
}
1
  • 4
    This is a really great answer that doesn't require additional HTML elements. Thanks! – patr1ck Feb 23 '14 at 21:15
31

You need then a wrapping element with the bg image and in it the content element with the bg color:

<div id="Wrapper">
  <div id="Content">
    <!-- content here -->
  </div>
</div>

and the css:

#Wrapper{
    background:url(../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png); 
    width:300px; 
    height:300px;
}

#Content{
    background-color:rgba(248,247,216,0.7); 
    width:100%; 
    height:100%;
}
20

I've used this as a way to both apply colour tints as well as gradients to images to make dynamic overlaying text easier to style for legibility when you can't control image colour profiles. You don't have to worry about z-index.

HTML

<div class="background-image"></div>

SASS

.background-image {
  background: url('../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png') repeat;
  &:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    background: rgba(248, 247, 216, 0.7);
  }
}

CSS

.background-image {
  background: url('../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png') repeat;
}

.background-image:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
    left: 0;
    background: rgba(248, 247, 216, 0.7);
  }

Hope it helps

2
  • This works, but you need to change the second "left: 0;" to "bottom: 0;" – Matthew Hudson Oct 13 '15 at 8:49
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer since it avoids unnecessary elements creation. Just make sure your .background-image div has at least a position: relative – mjsarfatti Sep 5 '16 at 8:52
8

See my answer at https://stackoverflow.com/a/18471979/193494 for a comprehensive overview of possible solutions:

  1. using multiple backgrounds with a linear gradient,
  2. multiple backgrounds with a generated PNG, or
  3. styling an :after pseudoelement to act as a secondary background layer.
1
  • 5
    Please don't post links as answers. Put the relevant code here, but link to the source you copied it from in addition. – Blazemonger Dec 17 '14 at 16:14
6

Why so complicated? Your solution was almost right except it's a way easier to make the pattern transparent and the background color solid. PNG can contain transparencies. So use photoshop to make the pattern transparent by setting the layer to 70% and resaving your image. Then you only need one selector. Works cross browser.

CSS:

.background {
   background: url('../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png');/* transparent png image*/
   background-color: rgb(248, 247, 216);
}

HTML:

<div class="background">
   ...
</div> 

This are the basic. A usage example follows where I switched from background to background-image but both properties works the same.

body { margin: 0; }
div {
   height: 110px !important;
   padding: 1em;
   text-transform: uppercase;
   font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
   font-weight: 600;
   color: white;
   text-shadow: 0 0 2px #333;
}
.background {
   background-image: url('https://www.transparenttextures.com/patterns/arabesque.png');/* transparent png image */
   }
.col-one {
  background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);
}
.col-two {
  background-color: rgb(0, 255, 255);
}
.col-three {
  background-color: rgb(0, 255, 0);
}
<div class="background col-one">
 1. Background
</div> 
<div class="background col-two">
 2. Background
</div> 
<div class="background col-three">
 3. Background
</div> 

PLEASE WAIT A MINUTE! IT TAKES SOME TIME TO LOAD THE EXTERNAL PATTERNS.

This website seems to be rather slow...

4
  • Can you apply background-color with for example :hover and that would overlay on top of the background image? – Sir Oct 20 '15 at 3:23
  • it would take longer to boot up Photoshop and do this, rather than add a few lines of code. – nihiser Feb 2 '17 at 20:20
  • I tried this but found the transparent png was quite large (~500kb) in file size, which may be a disadvantage of this approach – madz May 9 '18 at 3:43
  • @madz I spoke of making a pattern - which shouldn't result in a big file. I added an example using a 110x110px image that has as little as 5kb. If you really need a bigger image try using tinypng.com to compress it. – Hexodus Jun 12 '19 at 15:48
4

Here is a more simple trick with only css.

<div class="background"> </div>
    <style>
    .background {
      position:relative;
      height:50px;
      background-color: rgba(248, 247, 216, 0.7);
      background-image: url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAgAAAAICAYAAADED76LAAAAJElEQVQYV2NctWrVfwYkEBYWxojMZ6SDAmT7QGx0K1EcRBsFAADeG/3M/HteAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); 
    }

    .background:after {
        content:" ";
        background-color:inherit;
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%; 
    }

    </style>

3

You can use a semitransparent pixel, which you can generate for example here, even in base64 Here is an example with white 50%:

background-image: url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAEAAAABCAQAAAC1HAwCAAAAC0lEQVR42mP8Xw8AAoMBgDTD2qgAAAAASUVORK5CYII=),
url(../img/leftpanel/intro1.png);
background-size: cover, cover;
  • without uploading

  • without extra html

  • i guess the loading should be quicker than box-shadow or linear gradient

3

Another one with an SVG as inline overlay-image (note: if you use # inside the svg-code you have to urlencode that!):

background: url('data:image/svg+xml;utf8,<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 1 1"><path fill="rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.4)" d="M0 0h1v1H0z"/></svg>')
                no-repeat center center/cover, 
            url('overlayed-image.jpg') no-repeat center center/cover;
1

I simply used background-image css property on the target background div.
Note background-image only accepts gradient color functions.
So I used linear-gradient adding the same desired overlay color twice (use last rgba value to control color opacity).

Also, found these two useful resources to:

  1. Add text (or div with any other content) over the background image: Hero Image
  2. Blur background image only, without blurring the div on top: Blurred Background Image

HTML

<div class="header_div">
</div>

<div class="header_text">
  <h1>Header Text</h1>
</div>

CSS

.header_div {
  position: relative;
  text-align: cover;
  min-height: 90vh;
  margin-top: 5vh;
  background-position: center;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-size: cover;
  width: 100vw;
  background-image: linear-gradient(rgba(38, 32, 96, 0.2), rgba(38, 32, 96, 0.4)), url("images\\header img2.jpg");
  filter: blur(2px);
}

.header_text {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  right: 50%;
  transform: translate(50%, -50%);
}
0

You can also add opacity to your overlay color.

Instead of doing

background: url('../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png');
background-color: rgba(248, 247, 216, 0.7);

You can do:

background: url('../img/bg/diagonalnoise.png');

Then create a new style for the opacity color:

.colorStyle{
    background-color: rgba(248, 247, 216, 0.7);
    opacity: 0.8;
}

Change the opacity to whatever number you want below 1. Then you make this color style the same size as your image. It should work.

0

#img-div{
    height: 100vh;
    background-image: url("https://images.pexels.com/photos/46160/field-clouds-sky-earth-46160.jpeg?auto=compress&cs=tinysrgb&dpr=2&h=750&w=1260");
    background-position: center;
    background-size: cover;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    position: relative;
}

#overlay-div{
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);
    height: 100vh;
    position: relative;
}
<div id="img-div">
  <div id="overlay-div"></div>
</div>

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