3

I'm trying to create a class which starts a thread-instance of a one of its member methods. When I do in main:

test myinstance;
std::thread mythread(myinstance);

then things compile. But using the following construction:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <thread>

class test
{
        std::thread *pt;
public:
        test()
        {
                pt = new std::thread(this);
        }

        void operator()() const
        {
                printf("thread start\n");
                sleep(5);
                printf("thread end\n");
        }
};

int main(int arg, char *argv[])
{
        test ptest;
        sleep(10);

        return 0;
}

I get the following error:

folkert@here:~$ g++ -std=c++0x test.cpp In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/thread:39:0, from test.cpp:3: /usr/include/c++/4.6/functional: In member function 'void std::_Bind_result<_Result, _Functor(_Bound_args ...)>::__call(std::tuple<_Args ...>&&, std::_Index_tuple<_Indexes ...>, typename std::_Bind_result<_Result, _Functor(_Bound_args ...)>::__enable_if_void<_Res>::type) [with _Res = void, _Args = {}, int ..._Indexes = {}, _Result = void, _Functor = test*, _Bound_args = {}, typename std::_Bind_result<_Result, _Functor(_Bound_args ...)>::__enable_if_void<_Res>::type = int]': /usr/include/c++/4.6/functional:1378:24: instantiated from 'std::_Bind_result<_Result, _Functor(_Bound_args ...)>::result_type std::_Bind_result<_Result, _Functor(_Bound_args ...)>::operator()(_Args&& ...) [with _Args = {}, _Result = void, _Functor = test*, _Bound_args = {}, std::_Bind_result<_Result, _Functor(_Bound_args ...)>::result_type = void]' /usr/include/c++/4.6/thread:117:13: instantiated from 'void std::thread::_Impl<_Callable>::_M_run() [with _Callable = std::_Bind_result]' test.cpp:28:1: instantiated from here /usr/include/c++/4.6/functional:1287:4: error: '((std::_Bind_result*)this)->std::_Bind_result::_M_f' cannot be used as a function

So my guess is that it won't work this way. My question now is: how can I, using std::thread, let a class start a thread of one of its own methods?

3

One of std::threads constructors looks like this:

template<typename Callable>
    explicit thread(Callable func);

This requires you to pass something that is callable, that means it can be invoked with operator(). What you're passing to your std::thread is not callable.

You cannot call this. this is a pointer to the current object, it is not callable.

You need pass a member function or other function into your std::thread constructor.

You could also create a functor and pass that, as that is callable.

EDIT: Just noticed have indeed overloaded operator(), to call it, you have do the follwowing:

  test t;
  std::thread my_thread(t); //invokes operator() on test.

//also remove this statement from your ctor:  pt = new std::thread(this);
  • 7
    Or use *this. – Some programmer dude Feb 8 '12 at 8:51
  • Ah yes, Joachim Pileborg gave the answer! If I do pt = new std::thread(*this); or even pt = new std::thread(std::ref(*this)); then it compiles and runs! – Folkert van Heusden Feb 8 '12 at 9:13
  • 2
    @FolkertvanHeusden I must say that your construct of starting the thread within the ctor of your class, when you are using the overloaded operator() of that same class, is strange. – Tony The Lion Feb 8 '12 at 9:23
  • 1
    @jalf the idea of doing it like this, is that I don't want the user of my class to know how it is doing its stuff. If it is e.g. retrieving the remote data at invocation-time or in the background. And indeed, I might be a little bit java influenced :-) – Folkert van Heusden Feb 8 '12 at 10:12
  • 1
    Then split it in two classes. One containing the thread object, and one that is passed to the thread to be executed. The two are completely different areas of concern, and shouldn't be in the same class. – jalf Feb 8 '12 at 12:30
3

Many fixes:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

struct test
{
    void operator()() const
    {
        std::cout << "thread start\n";
        sleep(5);
        std::cout << "thread end\n";
    }
};

int main(int arg, char *argv[])
{
    std::thread pt(std::move(test()));

    pt.join();
    return 0;
}

Fixes

  • separation of concerns (you can run test without a thread now, yay!)
  • leaking the std::thread instance (memory + resource)
  • not (deterministically) waiting for the thread to finish; this is UB even if you think you know that sleep will run longer
  • Note how avoid the local/copy of ptest by doing a move. Technically, std::move is redundant there, but I like things specific and you'd run into the most vexing parse:

    std::thread pt((test()));
    
  • about that testing without a thread: I could add a parameter to the constructor like bool debug that doesn't start the thread and then manually call the worker-part (which would normally be in a thread). that way the information hiding is kept. – Folkert van Heusden Feb 8 '12 at 12:31
  • could the downvoter please clarify? – sehe Feb 8 '12 at 12:31
  • @FolkertvanHeusden since when is a the execution model information? It might be if the class was TaskManager or something. Right now, it is logically not the responsibility of a functor to decide where it executes, neither the responsability of a thread to decide what functionality to call...? That's not information hiding, that's promiscuous information sharing in my view – sehe Feb 8 '12 at 14:38
  • I hide the information how and when etc. things are retrieved. Well, maybe "information hiding" is not the correct name for it but what I'm trying to achieve is a black-box that retrieves something somehow without showing the outside world how things are done. – Folkert van Heusden Feb 8 '12 at 15:15
  • @FolkertvanHeusden: async/future? See also BM's blog corensic.com/Learn/Resources/ConcurrencyTutorialPartSix.aspx – sehe Feb 8 '12 at 17:59
2

Try this.

pt = new std::thread( std::ref( *this ) );

  • Ooops, sorry saw my answer was a duplicate. – BitTwiddler Feb 5 '14 at 16:06

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