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When you call ToByteArray() on a GUID in .NET, the ordering of the bytes in the resulting array is not what you'd expect as compared to the string representation of the GUID. For example, for the following GUID represented as a string:

11223344-5566-7788-9900-aabbccddeeff

The result of ToByteArray() is this:

44, 33, 22, 11, 66, 55, 88, 77, 99, 00, AA, BB, CC, DD, EE, FF

Note that the order of the first four bytes is reversed. Also bytes 4 and 5 are swapped and bytes 6 and 7 are swapped. But the final 8 bytes are in the same order they're represented as in the string.

I understand that this is occurring. What I would like to know is why .NET handles it this way.

For reference, you can see some discussion and confusion about this (incorrect attributed to Oracle databases) here and here.

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    a) it really does not matter. b) it's a big little endian issue. Feb 8, 2012 at 14:51
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    a) It really does matter when it's bitten you. Also, having a better understanding of not only how things work, but also why they work that way, makes you better able to avoid being bitten by counterintuitive behaviors like this. b) It was fairly clear from the start that it's an endian-ness issue. But it's particularly perplexing because the final 8 bytes are left in their original order. Also, if you're going to represent a GUID as a string of hex, wouldn't it make more sense to represent it in the actual byte order? Feb 8, 2012 at 14:54
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    @aakashM: Wow, I had forgotten entirely about that. I read this question and thought "hmm, this might make a good blog article". This is not the first time I've thought that about something I've already written, either. Feb 8, 2012 at 16:13
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    @Eric happens to me all the time: Run into a problem, Google the problem, find a result on StackOverflow that helps me, realize that I'm the one who either asked or even answered the question, 2+ years ago. Feb 8, 2012 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

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If you read the Examples section from the GUID constructor, you'll find your answer:

Guid(1,2,3,new byte[]{0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7}) creates a Guid that corresponds to "00000001-0002-0003-0001-020304050607".

a is a 32-bit integer, b is a 16-bit integer, c is a 16-bit integer, and d is simply 8 bytes.

Because a, b, and c are integer types rather than raw bytes, they are subject to endian ordering when choosing how to display them. The RFC for GUID's (RFC4122) states that they should be presented in big endian format.

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    The RFC 4122 format specification applies to how a GUID is to be encoded "on the wire", and only in the absence of contextual requirements to the contrary. That said, the output of ToByteArray is awkward because the little-endian fields break field-oblivious binary sortability. Jan 27, 2015 at 2:15
0

@user7116's answer says why.

That said, I have wrote an extension method to fix the order,

byte[] ToByteArrayMatchingStringRepresentation(Guid)

which takes endianness into account using BitConverter, and changes the order in-place. This extension method is useful when converting the Guid to some other base (say base64/base32) and roundtripping (Guid -> bytes -> base64/base32 -> bytes -> Guid).

using System;

namespace rm.Extensions;

/// <summary>
/// Guid extensions.
/// </summary>
public static class GuidExtension
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns a 16-element byte array that contains the value of this instance
    /// matching its string representation (endian-agnostic).
    /// <para></para>
    /// See https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9195551/why-does-guid-tobytearray-order-the-bytes-the-way-it-does
    /// <remarks>
    /// <para></para>
    /// Note: The byte[] returned by <see cref="ToByteArrayMatchingStringRepresentation(Guid)"/> will not yield
    /// the original Guid with <see cref="Guid(byte[])"/> ctor.
    /// </remarks>
    /// </summary>
    public static byte[] ToByteArrayMatchingStringRepresentation(this Guid guid)
    {
        var bytes = guid.ToByteArray();
        TweakOrderOfGuidBytesToMatchStringRepresentation(bytes);
        return bytes;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Guid"></see> structure by using the specified array of bytes
    /// matching its string representation (endian-agnostic).
    /// <para></para>
    /// See https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9195551/why-does-guid-tobytearray-order-the-bytes-the-way-it-does
    /// <remarks>
    /// <para></para>
    /// Note: The Guid returned by <see cref="ToGuidMatchingStringRepresentation(byte[])"/> will not yield
    /// the original byte[] with <see cref="Guid.ToByteArray()"/>.
    /// </remarks>
    /// </summary>
    public static Guid ToGuidMatchingStringRepresentation(this byte[] bytes)
    {
        _ = bytes ??
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(bytes));
        if (bytes.Length != 16)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Length should be 16.", nameof(bytes));
        }
        TweakOrderOfGuidBytesToMatchStringRepresentation(bytes);
        return new Guid(bytes);
    }

    private static void TweakOrderOfGuidBytesToMatchStringRepresentation(byte[] guidBytes)
    {
        if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
        {
            Array.Reverse(guidBytes, 0, 4);
            Array.Reverse(guidBytes, 4, 2);
            Array.Reverse(guidBytes, 6, 2);
        }
    }
}

source: https://github.com/rmandvikar/csharp-extensions/blob/dev/src/rm.Extensions/GuidExtension.cs

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