11

I am trying to create an indexed view in SQL Server and I was wondering If I needed to index the view columns.

I am asking this because the view is composed of a tables that already have the columns indexed.

So if TABLE1 has the column FOO already indexed as a non clustered index, do I have to add an index for the column FOO to the newly created view for SQL Server to use the index?

Or will SQL Server know to use the index in TABLE1 when searching the view?

The view looks like this

CREATE VIEW [dbo].[v_eventActivity] 
WITH SCHEMABINDING 
AS 
  SELECT ea.id, 
         e.eventID, 
         e.name, 
         ea.userID, 
         ea.activityTypeID, 
         ea.timeStamp, 
         ea.visitDuration 
  FROM   dbo.table1 e, 
         dbo.table2 ea 
  WHERE  e.eventID = ea.eventID 

I am going to be searching on all of those columns together.

As stated before, table1 and table2 all have already have those columns indexed.

6
  • I thought I knew the answer to this but in writing it determined that in fact I do not. Good Q! the best way to know may be to try it and see. also you should specify what SS version. – JNK Feb 8 '12 at 18:42
  • Typically an indexed view does not represent the entire table, so representing the index on a specific column usually does not make sense. Have you created the view yet? Can you share the table structure, the index you're talking about, and the definition for the view (including its indexes)? – Aaron Bertrand Feb 8 '12 at 18:44
  • I actually did try. The query execution plan says that It does use the index of the original tables. But I just wanted to make sure. – KDV Feb 8 '12 at 18:44
  • Well the exec plan would know ;) – JNK Feb 8 '12 at 18:46
  • 1
    @Yuck well I started answering, but realized the optimizer can opportunistically use the indexed view index, so it probably can for the table as well, but then I realized I didn't know for sure so hoped aaron or someone smart would answer. – JNK Feb 8 '12 at 18:49
7

The view will simply utilize the table index unless the NOEXPAND hint is supplied (documentation here).

You can test this yourself as follows:

CREATE TABLE [test].[TestTable] (
    id INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    foo INT
)

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX ixFoo
ON [test].[TestTable] (foo)

CREATE VIEW [test].[TestTableView] WITH SCHEMABINDING
AS
    SELECT
        t.id,
        t.foo
    FROM [test].[TestTable] t
GO

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX ixFooId
ON [test].[TestTableView] (id)

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX ixFooView
ON [test].[TestTableView] (foo)

Here's the execution plan for three separate queries:

SELECT
    t.[id],
    t.[foo]
FROM [test].[TestTable] t
ORDER BY t.[foo]

The table query execution plan

SELECT
    v.[id],
    v.[foo]
FROM [test].[TestTableView] v
ORDER BY v.[foo]

The view with no hint

SELECT
    v.[id],
    v.[foo]
FROM [test].[TestTableView] v WITH (NOEXPAND)
ORDER BY v.[foo]

The view with the NOEXPAND hint

4

Indexed views in SQL Server are, as near as makes no difference, what's called materialized view elsewhere. If your view has an underlying query that uses indexes defined on the base tables, the select on the view will use the index as well, that's not what an indexed views are about.

If you are using the view quite often and performance matters, you can choose to give up some more disk space (and cpu time) and create a unique clustered index on the view, thus enable even faster queries on the view, because SQL Server will not have to go back to the base table or tables, and get everything it needs from the index of the view.

Have a look here.

5
  • 1
    If it's already an indexed view, you can't add a unique clustered index on the view. That's the definition of an indexed view (you can't create a non-unique or non-clustered index on a view unless a unique clustered index already exists). – Aaron Bertrand Feb 8 '12 at 18:55
  • 1
    @AaronBertrand: the view must have no prior indexes, i don't imply it has! The table(s) may have indexes. – Mithrandir Feb 8 '12 at 18:57
  • 1
    The way I read it, your description makes it should like you should add a unique clustered index to an indexed view. – Aaron Bertrand Feb 8 '12 at 19:00
  • Sorry, thats an misunderstanding, in fact that's what you do, you take a nice clean view with no indexes and define a single clustered unique index! That MAKES is a indexed view! This is done in e.g. Oracle quite a bit, at least i used to do it in certain cases. – Mithrandir Feb 8 '12 at 19:04
  • Yes, I'm pretty sure we understand how indexed views work. I was merely pointing out that your description may be misleading and confusing to some, so wanted to clarify that you can't add a clustered index to an indexed view. – Aaron Bertrand Feb 8 '12 at 19:31

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