14

I am used to angle brackets being used to specify a type, as a parameter:

vector<int> vecOfInts ;

But in rapidjson, there is code like this:

document.Parse<0>(json) ;

The document.Parse method's signature is:

template <unsigned parseFlags>
GenericDocument& Parse(const Ch* str) {
    RAPIDJSON_ASSERT(!(parseFlags & kParseInsituFlag));
    GenericStringStream<Encoding> s(str);
    return ParseStream<parseFlags>(s);
}

I didn't know you could pass a value inside angle brackets - thought angle brackets were used for typenames alone.

What is the code here doing, and why is he passing a value in the angle brackets?

Is this a good idea? When?

1
  • 2
    Look up "non-type template parameter".
    – Jesse Good
    Feb 8, 2012 at 22:46

1 Answer 1

23

There are two different factors going on here.

First, it's possible to define templates that are parameterized over things other than just types. For example, here's a simple array type:

template <typename T, size_t N> struct Array {
    T arr[N];
};

We can use this like

Array<int, 137> myArray;

We know that vector<int> and vector<double> are different types. But now we must also point out that Array<int,137> and Array<int,136> are different types.

Second, when using templates, the compiler has to be able to figure out a value for all of the template arguments. When you're using template classes, this is why you typically specify all the template arguments. You don't say vector x, for example, but instead say something like vector<double> x. When using template functions, most of the time the compiler can figure out the arguments. For example, to use std::sort, you just say something like

std::sort(v.begin(), v.end());

However, you could also write

std::sort<vector<int>::iterator>(v.begin(), v.end());

to be more explicit. But sometimes, you have a template function for which not all the arguments can be figured out. In your example, we have this:

template <unsigned parseFlags>
GenericDocument& Parse(const Ch* str) {
    RAPIDJSON_ASSERT(!(parseFlags & kParseInsituFlag));
    GenericStringStream<Encoding> s(str);
    return ParseStream<parseFlags>(s);
}

Notice that the parseFlags template parameter can't be deduced from just the arguments of the function. As a result, to call the function, you must specify the template parameter, since otherwise the compiler can't figure it out. That's why you'd write something like

Parse<0>(myString);

Here, the 0 is a template argument (resolved at compile-time), and myString is the actual argument (resolved at run-time).

You can actually have methods that combine a bit of type inference and a bit of explicit type parameters. For example, in Boost, there's a function lexical_cast that can do conversions to and from string types. The function signature to convert from a non-string type to a string type is

template <typename Target, typename Source>
    Target lexical_cast(const Source& arg);

Here, if you call lexical_cast, the compiler can figure out what Source is, but it can't deduce Target without some hints. To use lexical_cast, therefore, you'd write something like

std::string myString = boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(toConvertToString);

More generally, the compiler says that you have to specify some number of template arguments (optionally 0), and it will try to deduce the rest. If it can, great! If not, it's a compile-time error. Using this, if you'd like, you could write a function like

template <int IntArgument, typename TypeArgment>
    void DoSomething(const TypeArgument& t) {
       /* ... */
}

To call this function, you'd have to invoke it like this:

DoSomething<intArg>(otherArg);

Here, this works because you have to explicitly tell the compiler what IntArgument is, but then the compiler can deduce TypeArgument from the type of the argument to DoSomething.

Hope this helps!

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