1

I have a following script:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('#q1_6').on("click", function(event){
    $('#q1-f').slideToggle(350);
  });
  $('#q1_7').on("click", function(event){
    $('#q1-m').slideToggle(350);
  });
  $('#q1_15').on("click", function(event){
    $('#q1-o').slideToggle(350);
  });
  $('#q2_6').on("click", function(event){
    $('#q2-f').slideToggle(350);
  });
  $('#q2_7').on("click", function(event){
    $('#q2-m').slideToggle(250);
  });
  $('#q2_15').on("click", function(event){
    $('#q2-o').slideToggle(350);
  });
  $('#q3_13').on("click", function(event){
    $('#q3-o').slideToggle(350);
  });
});

Are these calls proper, or maybe I should somehow refactor the script to avoid duplication?

Edit: I am creating a survey with about 20 questions displayed on one page. Answers are in checkboxes. Some answers have additional options (sub-answers), which should be shown when user clicks parental answer. Here is HTML markup for better understanding

  <div>
    <input type="checkbox" id="q1_5"/><label for="q1_5">Answer 5</label>
  </div>
  <div>
    <input type="checkbox" id="q1_6"/><label for="q1_6">Answer 6</label>
  </div>
  <div id="q1-f">
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" id="q1_6_1"/><label for="q1_6_1">Answer 6-1</label>
    </div>     
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" id="q1_6_2"/><label for="q1_6_2">Answer 6-2</label>
    </div>     
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" id="q1_6_3"/><label for="q1_6_3">Answer 6-3</label>
    </div>         
  </div>

Current script works well, but I am wondering if I can avoid repeats of the same code snippets.

0

7 Answers 7

3

If you have access to the HTML and can influence the structure of the elements which when clicked initiate the toggle, then I'd add a class and data attribute:

<a href='#' id='q1_6' class='toggle' data-toggle-id='q1-f'>blah</a>
$(document).ready(function() {
  $('a.toggle').on('click', function(){
    var $el = $(this),
        toggleID = '#' + $el.attr('data-toggle-id'),
        toggleValue = 350;

    $(toggleID).slideToggle(toggleValue);
  });
});
1
  • Ah, 1 minute before me. :) I guess I have to learn to write faster. :]
    – freakish
    Feb 9, 2012 at 11:03
2

given no idea on how IDs are correlated in your example.

function toggle(id, id2, value){
    $(id).on("click", function(event){
      $(id2).slideToggle(value);
    });
}

toggle('#q1_15', '#q1-0', 350); 
1

You could do :

$('[id^="q"]').on("click", function(e){
     //get the id of the clicked button
     var id = e.target.id;
     switch(id){
         //do all cases based on id
      }
});

This could be done in an even cleaner way if there is some element to which we could delegate the event handling, but you didn't show us your markup. It would be something like

$('body').on("click",'[id^="q"]',  function(e){
     //get the id of the clicked button
     var id = e.target.id;
     switch(id){
         //do all cases based on id
      }
});

This second option use only one event handler (good) but it has to wait until the event is bubbled up the DOM (might be bad)

1

Why don't you create a javascript object where keys denote the id of element that accepts clicks and corresponding value is the id of element to show. Something like:

var clickHanders = {
    "q1_6": "q1-f",
    "q1_7": "q1-m"
    // ...
};

Then all you need is:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("div[id^=q]").on("click", function(event) {
        var srcId = this.id;
        var dstId = clickHanders[srcId];
        if (dstId) {
            $("#" + dstId).slideToggle(350);
        }
    });
});

Edit

I now see that the slide duration can be different as well. You can still use the above approach:

var clickHanders = {
    "q1_6": {
        "elementId": "q1-f",
        "duration": "350"
    },
    "q2_7": {
        "elementId": "q2-m",
        "duration": "250"
    }
    //...
};
$(document).ready(function() {
    $("div[id^=q]").on("click", function(event) {
        var srcId = this.id;
        var dstData = clickHanders[srcId];
        if (dstData) {
            $("#" + dstData.elementId).slideToggle(dstData.duration);
        }
    });
});

This code looks longer than your original code but perhaps more sensible.

0

There are some things to ask when you refactor:

  • Are you having speed problems?
  • Are you having memory problems?
  • Does the code look ugly?

You should not be refactoring code just to refactor it and optimize something where it is not needed. If the code is not too slow and does not have a too high memory consumption (all in the eye of the beholder) and is readable, you have good code.

My idea would be to serialize the event trigger, event target and slideToggle amount, so you could iterate through some kind of Collection and bind it. But would that be worth it?

0

Well, each handler does the very same thing, so here's what you should do:

Refactor your HTML, for example:

<div id="q1-6" data-to="q1-f"></div>

for each object (you can use other HTML attributes). Then you can define handlers:

$('#q1-6,#q1-7,#someother_id,#watman,#foo').click(function() {
   var id = $(this).attr('data-to');
   $('#'+id).slideToggle(350);
});
-1

There is no way to shorten your code, because there is nothing exactly the same, so your code is ok.

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