2

I am looking to listen to the onComplete event from all ajax requests from outside of the individual requests themselves.

I would like to fire an event when any/all ajax requests complete.

Is this possible?

Thanks in advance, Tim

Edit: requirements mootools lib only (v1.4)

3

This can be tricky if you want to observe and intercept only. The code is quite simple. my choice for a single Request proto change would be Class.refactor from mootools-more, if available:

// enable log func...
Class.refactor(Request, {
    success: function(text, xml){
        this.previous(text, xml);
        Request.monitor && typeof Request.monitor == "function" && Request.monitor.apply(this, arguments);            
    },
    failure: function(){
        this.previous();
        Request.monitor && typeof Request.monitor == "function" && Request.monitor.apply(this, arguments);            
    }
});

and the common bit - this is the same whichever way you go.

// assign a logger function
Request.monitor = function() {
    console.log("onComplete", this.response.text);
};

// call a simple request object.   
new Request({
    url: "/echo/html/",
    method: "post",
    data: {
        html: "hello"
    }
}).send();

The reason: it will work independently of mootools-core changes. It does not care what the func code is, it will run ours after the original and will not break, unless there's a huge api change in the future

You can also change classes through implement instead, though this won't account for changes in mootools-core, however likely that may be. in practice that means, copy and paste current func in the methods and add to it - luckily, short methods we want to mod:

Request.implement({
    success: function(text, xml){
        this.onSuccess(this.processScripts(text), xml);
        Request.monitor && typeof Request.monitor == "function" && Request.monitor.apply(this, arguments);            
    },
    failure: function(){
        this.onFailure();
        Request.monitor && typeof Request.monitor == "function" && Request.monitor.apply(this, arguments);            
    }
});

And finally, you can even save the old low level var oldsuccess = Request.prototype.success, do your thing and oldsuccess.apply(this, arguments) it.

The difficulty is, subclasses of Request like HTML and JSON - if already defined, they will have copied the old prototype and your logger will do nowt. you can instead do this as a small object and implement it into all Request classes.

Something like this is elegant and could work but only if the success methods are the same in code, else - it will break stuff in subclasses:

(function() {
    var changes = {
        success: function(text, xml){
            this.onSuccess(this.processScripts(text), xml);
            Request.monitor && typeof Request.monitor == "function" && Request.monitor.apply(this, arguments);            
        },
        failure: function(){
            this.onFailure();
            Request.monitor && typeof Request.monitor == "function" && Request.monitor.apply(this, arguments);            
        }
    };

    [Request, Request.HTML, Request.JSON].invoke('implement', changes);
})();

a combo of last method + orig proto is what you really need as the success funcs differ across all 3...

edit this is getting ridiculous. like i said, not the easiest task...

this would probably be the final version / refactor I'd use in production, tested and working with all 3 classes. Keep in mind the methods done are BEFORE the extra parsing for JSON or HTML take place. it's low level logging. else, refactor to go after onSuccess and onFailure instead.

(function() {
    // what we will extend
    var classes = [Request, Request.HTML, Request.JSON],
        // map to a text name
        mapper = ["Request", "Request.HTML", "Request.JSON"],
        // store reference to original methods
        orig = {
            onSuccess: Request.prototype.onSuccess,
            onFailure: Request.prototype.onFailure
        },
        // changes to protos to implement
        changes = {
            onSuccess: function(){
                Request.Spy && typeof Request.Spy == "function" && Request.Spy.apply(this, arguments);
                orig.onSuccess.apply(this, arguments);
            },
            onFailure: function(){
                Request.Spy && typeof Request.Spy == "function" && Request.Spy.apply(this, arguments);
                orig.onFailure.apply(this, arguments);
            }
        };

    classes.invoke('implement', changes);

    // allow us to tell which Class prototype has called the ajax
    Request.implement({
        getClass: function() {
            var ret;
            Array.each(classes, function(klass, index) {
                if (instanceOf(this, klass)) {
                    ret = mapper[index];
                }
            }, this);
            return ret;
        }
    });
})();

// to enable spying, just define Request.Spy as a function:
Request.Spy = function() {
    console.log(this.getClass(), arguments);
};

// test it via normal Request
new Request({
    url: "/echo/html/",
    data: {
        html: "normal data"    
    }
}).send();


// test via HTML
new Request.HTML({
    url: "/echo/html/",
    data: {
        html: "<p>normal data</p>"    
    }
}).send();

// test via JSON
new Request.JSON({
     url: "/echo/json/",
     data: {
        json: JSON.encode({'normal':'data'})    
     }
}).send();

jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/dimitar/3rnKe/

  • Dimitar as always you are the man! Thanks for the break down I will test and re-post my findings in the coming days, THX again! – Tim Wickstrom Feb 9 '12 at 21:50
  • 2
    's ok gives me more stuff to put on my blog :) – Dimitar Christoff Feb 9 '12 at 22:03
  • in the final version refactored I changed proto.implement to Klass.implement and everything works fantastic. Tested with Request, Request.HTML, Request.JSON. For anybody who is watching this Request.monitor will be passed the request object as "this" inside your function and you will have anything/everything available to you. Thanks again! – Tim Wickstrom Feb 9 '12 at 22:38
  • This is working very well, however it is limited to one monitor. Pondering whether it would be worth it to attach multiple monitors... – Tim Wickstrom Feb 9 '12 at 23:26
  • 1
    yeah, you can use addEvent / fireEvent on a private object or class. you can even write it as a class you mix-in. – Dimitar Christoff Feb 9 '12 at 23:33
0

EDIT: Solution works for jQuery. NOT MooTools.

$(document).ajaxComplete(function() {
  $(this).text('Triggered ajaxComplete handler.');
});

Take a look at: http://api.jquery.com/ajaxComplete/

  • Sorry man that is for jQuery I am looking for mooTools. – Tim Wickstrom Feb 9 '12 at 17:33
  • However good resource to check out to port to mootools if it does not already exist. – Tim Wickstrom Feb 9 '12 at 17:34
  • Whoops. Sorry about that... I was a little quick of the mark and missed the mootools tag. – osahyoun Feb 9 '12 at 19:28
  • no prob thanks for trying – Tim Wickstrom Feb 9 '12 at 19:57

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