2

Here is a simplified version of the code I'm working on.

main :: IO ()
main = do
     args <- getArgs
     if null args
       then putStr "> " ; userInput <- getLine
       else userInput <- readFile $ head args

     let conclusion = userInput

This won't work without do notation, the variable won't pass to conclusion below when I do use it, and the putStr, which I'm trying to use to create a kind of prompt, just makes it mad.

Is there something that I'm forgetting to add somewhere?

8

There are a few problems here. First, you need to include do after then and else:

if null args
  then do putStr "> " ; userInput <- getLine
  else do userInput <- readFile $ head args

if in do notation is the same as if everywhere else; you have to put an expression after then and else, not statements, and you need do to turn a bunch of statements into an expression. This still isn't quite valid, though; the last statement in a do block must be an expression, but you have a bind here. After all, every statement has to have a result value, but a bind has none.

The second problem is, as you've observed, that this introduces a new scope, and so you can't access variables you bind from outside. This makes sense if you think about it; after all, you could bind the variable on one side and not the other. The solution is to simply move the bind outside the if:

main :: IO ()
main = do
     args <- getArgs
     userInput <- if null args
       then do putStr "> " ; getLine
       else readFile $ head args

     let conclusion = userInput

So, the action whose result we bind to userInput is still computed depending on the result of null args, but we bind the variable outside the conditional.

Note that I didn't add a do to the else branch this time; it's not required, since there's only a single expression there. (It's still valid, but it's unidiomatic to use do when it's not necessary.)

This code still won't work unless you put something after the let conclusion = userInput line (since, like I said, do blocks must end with an expression), but presumably you already have code there.

As an additional note, you should avoid using functions like head and tail; head is a partial function (not defined for every argument — head [] will produce an error), and those are generally considered unidiomatic. You should use pattern-matching instead, like this:

userInput <- case args of
  [] -> do putStr "> " ; getLine
  fileName:_ -> readFile fileName

This is just like the pattern-matching used when defining a function, but for a single value rather than any number of arguments.

  • 1
    Rather than the weird do, I think it would make more sense to just use the monad operators directly: if null args then putStr "> " >> getLine – Chuck Feb 9 '12 at 19:15
  • 3
    I think just learned more from your post about Haskell program structure than half of the Haskell tutorials I've looked through. Seriously. You've given me some good vocabulary to research. Thank you. – subtlearray Feb 9 '12 at 19:34
3

Any variable bindings you do in the then and else blocks won't be visible in the outer scope, so you need to bind the result from the if clause itself.

main :: IO ()
main = do
    args <- getArgs
    userInput <- if null args
        then do
            putStr "> "
            getLine
        else readFile $ head args
  • 1
    I need to do some more research on binding. I had no idea you could bind an if statement to a variable. That's clever. Thank you for your reply. – subtlearray Feb 9 '12 at 19:35
  • 2
    @SubtleArray: syntactically, the right hand side of a binding statement can be any expression; if ... then ... else is just another type of expression, as is case. You do also have to respect the type system, which requires that in a statement like pattern <- expression, expression must have type Monad m => m a (in your example, IO a), and pattern must have type a. You can think of if ... then ... else as if it was a function of type Bool -> a -> a -> a, so that the type of the whole if expression is the same as the type of the then and else clauses. – Luis Casillas Feb 9 '12 at 20:58
  • +1 to both answers. As I also had no idea you could bind if statements in that way. Both pointed me in the right direction to solving an issue I had. Came sooo close to asking a question on SO, but once again I've found/figured out the answer thanks to existing questions. – atomicules Sep 5 '12 at 10:21

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