How can I loop through all members in a JavaScript object including values that are objects.

For example, how could I loop through this (accessing the "your_name" and "your_message" for each)?

var validation_messages = {
    "key_1": {
        "your_name": "jimmy",
        "your_msg": "hello world"
    },
    "key_2": {
        "your_name": "billy",
        "your_msg": "foo equals bar"
    }
}

20 Answers 20

up vote 1882 down vote accepted
for (var key in validation_messages) {
    // skip loop if the property is from prototype
    if (!validation_messages.hasOwnProperty(key)) continue;

    var obj = validation_messages[key];
    for (var prop in obj) {
        // skip loop if the property is from prototype
        if(!obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) continue;

        // your code
        alert(prop + " = " + obj[prop]);
    }
}
  • 12
    Internet Explorer does not agree (sigh), says "Object does not support this property or method" when you do obj[prop]. I have yet to find a solution to this. – user999717 Dec 21 '11 at 12:02
  • 32
    If you're using jQuery, $.each() /does/ work in IE. – user999717 Dec 21 '11 at 13:16
  • 2
    @MildFuzz actually it makes sense if you consider that JS objects do not necessary have numerical keys. You can't just iterate through an object. JS's for in is very similar to a traditional foreach. – Jake Wilson Feb 28 '13 at 5:16
  • 3
    for...in is a good solution, but if you use promises in the for()-loop be careful, because if you create a var in the loop, you can't use it in the promise' then-function. You var in the loop exists only one time, so it has in every then-function the same, even the last value. If you have that problem, try "Object.keys(obj).forEach" or my answer below. – Biber Nov 22 '16 at 21:15

Under ECMAScript 5, you can combine Object.keys() and Array.prototype.forEach():

var obj = {
  first: "John",
  last: "Doe"
};

//
//	Visit non-inherited enumerable keys
//
Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key) {

  console.log(key, obj[key]);

});

  • 18
    +1 for brevity of code but apparently, doesn't perform as efficient as a for surprisingly. JSPerf - for in vs Object.keys – techiev2 Sep 4 '12 at 12:33
  • 6
    Beware of this error using this approach: "TypeError: Object.keys called on non-object". The for ... in ... hasOwnProperty pattern can be called on anything, as far as I can tell (object, array, null, undefined, true, false, number primitive, objects). – theazureshadow Oct 12 '12 at 2:17
  • 2
    Note that IE7 doesn't support this. – Paul D. Waite Nov 8 '13 at 11:02
  • 2
    @techiev2 those tests were never valid. See my updated ones for the current state of performance: jsperf.com/objdir/20 – OrganicPanda Oct 16 '14 at 10:39
  • 3
    @techiev2: it's not Object.keys() which makes it slow, it's rather the forEach() and the repeated access to .length! If you use a classic for-loop instead, it's almost twice as fast as for..in + hasOwnProperty() in Firefox 33. – CoDEmanX Nov 5 '14 at 23:50

The problem with this

for (var key in validation_messages) {
   var obj = validation_messages[key];
   for (var prop in obj) {
      alert(prop + " = " + obj[prop]);
   }
}

is that you’ll also loop through the primitive object's prototype.

With this one you will avoid it:

for (var key in validation_messages) {
   if (validation_messages.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      var obj = validation_messages[key];
      for (var prop in obj) {
         if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            alert(prop + " = " + obj[prop]);
         }
      }
   }
}
  • 44
    In short: check hasOwnProperty inside your for-in loops. – Rory O'Kane Nov 21 '12 at 5:11
  • 50
    Note that this is only necessary if your object HAS prototype methods. For example, if the object you're looping through is just a JSON object, you won't need this check. – gitaarik Dec 29 '13 at 19:46
  • 6
    @rednaw To be safe I use that check because Object.prototype can be modified. No sane script would do that, but you cannot control what scripts might be run in your page by insane browser extensions. Browser extensions run in your page (on most browsers) and they can cause odd problems (e.g. set window.setTimeout to null!). – robocat Dec 5 '14 at 2:42

In ES6 you can loop through an object like this: (using arrow function)

Object.keys(myObj).forEach(key => {
    console.log(key);          // the name of the current key.
    console.log(myObj[key]);   // the value of the current key.
});

jsbin

In ES7 you can use Object.entries instead of Object.keys and loop through an object like this:

Object.entries(myObj).forEach(([key, val]) => {
    console.log(key);          // the name of the current key.
    console.log(val);          // the value of the current key.
});

The above would also work as a one-liner:

Object.keys(myObj).forEach(key => console.log(key, myObj[key]));

jsbin

In case you want to loop through nested objects as well, you can use a recursive function (ES6):

const loopNestedObj = (obj) => {
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(key => {
    if (obj[key] && typeof obj[key] === 'object') loopNestedObj(obj[key]);  // recurse.
    else console.log(key, obj[key]);  // or do something with key and val.
  });
};

jsbin

Same as function above, but with ES7 Object.entries instead of Object.keys:

const loopNestedObj = (obj) => {
  Object.entries(obj).forEach(([key, val]) => {
    if (val && typeof val === 'object') loopNestedObj(val);  // recurse.
    else console.log(key, val);  // or do something with key and val.
  });
};

If you are into functional programming you can use Object.keys/Object.entries to enumerate the object, then process the values and then use reduce() to convert back to a new object.

const loopNestedObj = (obj) => 
  Object.keys(obj)
    // Use .filter(), .map(), etc. if you need.
    .reduce((newObj, key) => 
      (obj[key] && typeof obj[key] === 'object') ?
        {...newObj, [key]: loopNestedObj(obj[key])} :  // recurse.
        {...newObj, [key]: obj[key]},                  // Define value.
      {});
  • 2
    for your ES7 using Object.entries example, you need to wrap the arrow function parameters [key,val] in parentheses like: `Object.entries(myObj).forEach(([key, val]) => { /* statements*/ } – Puiu Mar 2 '17 at 17:10
  • 5
    I think it would be useful to add the fact that Object.entries and Object.keys does not iterate over the prototype which is the big difference between it and the for in construct. – steviejay Mar 28 '17 at 19:06

Using Underscore.js’s _.each:

_.each(validation_messages, function(value, key){
    _.each(value, function(value, key){
        console.log(value);
    });
});
  • 3
    Thanks Tim, using underscore so definitely good to have a quick and clean option. – The Coder Oct 21 '12 at 22:18

If you use recursion you can return object properties of any depth-

function lookdeep(object){
    var collection= [], index= 0, next, item;
    for(item in object){
        if(object.hasOwnProperty(item)){
            next= object[item];
            if(typeof next== 'object' && next!= null){
                collection[index++]= item +
                ':{ '+ lookdeep(next).join(', ')+'}';
            }
            else collection[index++]= [item+':'+String(next)];
        }
    }
    return collection;
}

//example

var O={
    a:1, b:2, c:{
        c1:3, c2:4, c3:{
            t:true, f:false
        }
    },
    d:11
};
var lookdeepSample= 'O={'+ lookdeep(O).join(',\n')+'}';


/*  returned value: (String)
O={
    a:1, 
    b:2, 
    c:{
        c1:3, c2:4, c3:{
            t:true, f:false
        }
    },
    d:11
}

*/
  • 2
    Beware of loops, like calling this on a DOM node. – theazureshadow Oct 12 '12 at 2:35

I know it's waaay late, but it did take me 2 minutes to write this optimized and improved version of AgileJon's answer:

var key, obj, prop, owns = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty;

for (key in validation_messages ) {

    if (owns.call(validation_messages, key)) {

        obj = validation_messages[key];

        for (prop in obj ) {

            // using obj.hasOwnProperty might cause you headache if there is
            // obj.hasOwnProperty = function(){return false;}
            // but owns will always work 
            if (owns.call(obj, prop)) {
                console.log(prop, "=", obj[prop]);
            }

        }

    }

}
  • 1
    Why are you storing hasOwnProperty in owns and then calling owns.call(obj, prop) instead of just calling obj.hasOwnProperty(prop) as this answer does? – Rory O'Kane Nov 21 '12 at 5:25
  • 13
    Because obj might have the hasOwnProperty function defined on it self so it will not use the one from Object.prototype. You can try before the for loop like this obj.hasOwnProperty = function(){return false;} and it will not iterate over any property. – Azder Nov 21 '12 at 5:38
  • 4
    @Azder +1 for the answer and +1 if I could for the nice thing about Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty. I saw that previously inside the source code of the underscore library but don't know why. – Samuel Jan 3 '14 at 15:28
for(var k in validation_messages) {
    var o = validation_messages[k];
    do_something_with(o.your_name);
    do_something_else_with(o.your_msg);
}

This answer is an aggregate of the solutions that were provided in this post with some performance feedbacks. I think there is 2 use-cases and the OP didn't mention if he needs to access the keys in order use them during the loop process.

I. the keys need to be accessed,

✔ the of and Object.keys approach

let k;
for (k of Object.keys(obj)) {

    /*        k : key
     *   obj[k] : value
     */
}

✔ the in approach

let k;
for (k in obj) {

    /*        k : key
     *   obj[k] : value
     */
}

Use this one with cautious, as it could print prototype'd properties of obj

✔ the ES7 approach

for (const [key, value] of Object.entries(obj)) {

}

However, at the time of the edit I wouldn't recommend the ES7 method, because JavaScript initializes a lot of variables internally to build this procedure (see the feedbacks for proof). Unless you are not developing a huge app which deserves optimization, then it is ok but if optimization is your priority you should think about it.

II. we just need to access each values,

✔ the of and Object.values approach

let v;
for (v of Object.values(obj)) {

}

More feedbacks about the tests :

  • Caching Object.keys or Object.values performance is negligible

For instance,

const keys = Object.keys(obj);
let i;
for (i of keys) {
  //
}
// same as
for (i of Object.keys(obj)) {
  //
}
  • For Object.values case, using a native for loop with cached variables in Firefox seems to be a little faster than using a for...of loop. However the difference is not that important and Chrome is running for...of faster than native for loop, so I would recommend to use for...of when dealing with Object.values in any cases (4th and 6th tests).

  • In Firefox, the for...in loop is really slow, so when we want to cache the key during the iteration it is better to use Object.keys. Plus Chrome is running both structure at equal speed (1st and last tests).

You can check the tests here : https://jsperf.com/es7-and-misc-loops

  • 1
    The ES7 example works like a charm with React Native! – Ty Bailey Oct 26 '17 at 20:58

p is the value

for (var key in p) {
  alert(key + ' => ' + p[key]);
}

OR

Object.keys(p).forEach(key => { console.log(key, p[key]) })
for(var key in validation_messages){
    for(var subkey in validation_messages[key]){
        //code here
        //subkey being value, key being 'yourname' / 'yourmsg'
    }
}

In ES7 you can do:

for (const [key, value] of Object.entries(obj)) {
  //
}
  • I made some tests, this method is really slow when dealing with large amount of data. – vdegenne Sep 24 '17 at 3:34

Here comes the improved and recursive version of AgileJon's solution (demo):

function loopThrough(obj){
  for(var key in obj){
    // skip loop if the property is from prototype
    if(!obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) continue;

    if(typeof obj[key] !== 'object'){
      //your code
      console.log(key+" = "+obj[key]);
    } else {
      loopThrough(obj[key]);
    }
  }
}
loopThrough(validation_messages);

This solution works for all kinds of different depths.

Another option:

var testObj = {test: true, test1: false};
for(let x of Object.keys(testObj)){
    console.log(x);
}
  • I tried your solution in Chrome 55.0 and you get a type error. Your answer looks nice and succinct, if you can get it working it would probably be one of the better options. I tried to figgure it out but don't understand your solution. – TolMera Dec 23 '16 at 13:38
  • 2
    @TolMera Fixed. – dude Dec 23 '16 at 14:05

I think it's worth pointing out that jQuery sorts this out nicely with $.each().

See: https://api.jquery.com/each/

For example:

$('.foo').each(function() {
    console.log($(this));
});

$(this) being the single item inside the object. Swap $('.foo') to a variable if you don't want to use jQuery's selector engine.

ECMAScript-2017, just finalized a month ago, introduces Object.values(). So now you can do this:

let v;
for (v of Object.values(validation_messages))
   console.log(v.your_name);   // jimmy billy

I couldn't get the above posts to do quite what I was after.

After playing around with the other replies here, I made this. It's hacky, but it works!

For this object:

var myObj = {
    pageURL    : "BLAH",
    emailBox   : {model:"emailAddress", selector:"#emailAddress"},
    passwordBox: {model:"password"    , selector:"#password"}
};

... this code:

// Get every value in the object into a separate array item ...
function buildArray(p_MainObj, p_Name) {
    var variableList = [];
    var thisVar = "";
    var thisYes = false;
    for (var key in p_MainObj) {
       thisVar = p_Name + "." + key;
       thisYes = false;
       if (p_MainObj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
          var obj = p_MainObj[key];
          for (var prop in obj) {
            var myregex = /^[0-9]*$/;
            if (myregex.exec(prop) != prop) {
                thisYes = true;
                variableList.push({item:thisVar + "." + prop,value:obj[prop]});
            }
          }
          if ( ! thisYes )
            variableList.push({item:thisVar,value:obj});
       }
    }
    return variableList;
}

// Get the object items into a simple array ...
var objectItems = buildArray(myObj, "myObj");

// Now use them / test them etc... as you need to!
for (var x=0; x < objectItems.length; ++x) {
    console.log(objectItems[x].item + " = " + objectItems[x].value);
}

... produces this in the console:

myObj.pageURL = BLAH
myObj.emailBox.model = emailAddress
myObj.emailBox.selector = #emailAddress
myObj.passwordBox.model = password
myObj.passwordBox.selector = #password

The solution that work for me is the following

_private.convertParams=function(params){
    var params= [];
    Object.keys(values).forEach(function(key) {
        params.push({"id":key,"option":"Igual","value":params[key].id})
    });
    return params;
}

var obj={
name:"SanD",
age:"27"
}
Object.keys(obj).forEach((key)=>console.log(key,obj[key]));

To loop through JavaScript Object we can use forEach and to optimize code we can use arrow function

In my case (on the basis of the preceding) is possible any number of levels.

var myObj = {
    rrr: undefined,
    pageURL    : "BLAH",
    emailBox   : {model:"emailAddress", selector:"#emailAddress"},
    passwordBox: {model:"password"    , selector:"#password"},
    proba: {odin:{dva:"rr",trr:"tyuuu"}, od:{ff:5,ppa:{ooo:{lll:'lll'}},tyt:'12345'}}
};


function lookdeep(obj,p_Name,gg){
    var A=[], tem, wrem=[], dd=gg?wrem:A;
    for(var p in obj){
        var y1=gg?'':p_Name, y1=y1 + '.' + p;
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(p)){
           var tem=obj[p];
           if(tem && typeof tem=='object'){
               a1=arguments.callee(tem,p_Name,true);
               if(a1 && typeof a1=='object'){for(i in a1){dd.push(y1 + a1[i])};}
            }
            else{
               dd.push(y1 + ':' + String(tem));
            }
        }
    };
    return dd
};


var s=lookdeep(myObj,'myObj',false);
for (var x=0; x < s.length; ++x) {
console.log(s[x]+'\n');}

result:

["myObj.rrr:undefined",
"myObj.pageURL:BLAH",
"myObj.emailBox.model:emailAddress",
"myObj.emailBox.selector:#emailAddress",
"myObj.passwordBox.model:password",
"myObj.passwordBox.selector:#password",
"myObj.proba.odin.dva:rr",
"myObj.proba.odin.trr:tyuuu",
"myObj.proba.od.ff:5",
"myObj.proba.od.ppa.ooo.lll:lll",
"myObj.proba.od.tyt:12345"]
  • 4
    \ (?_?)/ confused – Steel Brain Aug 2 '14 at 9:24

protected by Pankaj Parkar Dec 14 '15 at 13:25

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