45

I have a file that contains:

something



something else

something else again

I need a bash command, sed/grep w.e that will produce the following output

something

something else

something else again

In other words, I need to replace multiple blank lines with just a single blank line. grep/sed are line based. I've never found a BASH solution that would work on multi-line regex patterns.

  • Quick clarification question: Does the file ever have lines that aren't separated by a blank line? – biggusjimmus May 28 '09 at 18:28
  • 4
    Do you ever have duplicate lines that are not blank? If not, you could use uniq. – Nathan Kitchen May 28 '09 at 18:38
  • There are lines that are not separated by a blank line. There could be duplicate lines. – Nick Zalutskiy May 28 '09 at 20:26

14 Answers 14

91

For BSD-derived systems (including GNU):

You just need cat with the -s option which causes it to remove repeated empty lines from its output:

cat -s

From man page: -s --squeeze-blank: suppress repeated empty output lines.

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  • 6
    for whatever reason that doesnt work for me cat -s file1 > file2 – qodeninja Mar 26 '14 at 3:20
  • 5
    @qodeninja It didn't work for me either when I was working with files with Windows line endings. Maybe that could be the problem for you too? When I converted the files to Unix line endings cat -s worked fine for me. – Victor Zamanian Apr 2 '14 at 19:40
  • in my version of cat on Solaris, the -s option has a different meaning "-s cat is silent about non-existent files" – dokaspar Mar 26 '15 at 13:23
  • @VictorZamanian Most of the time it is not possible to redirect back into a file like qodeninja did. For more information, read here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6696842/… – Filip Allberg Nov 30 '16 at 18:47
  • 2
    Note that it can be used through a pipe : some_output|cat -s. – Skippy le Grand Gourou Mar 22 '17 at 15:44
27

I just solved this problem by sed. Even if this is a 7 years old question, someone may can here for help, so I am writing my solution by sed here:

sed 'N;/^\n$/D;P;D;'
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  • 3
    This works well for me, and because it's sed, I can use -i for in place fixes. – Kieran Jun 13 '17 at 11:57
  • 2
    Wierdly this also removes the last 2 lines fo the file for me (on OSX sed) – Nicolas Garnier Feb 27 '18 at 11:41
  • sed '$!N;/^\n$/{$q;D;};P;D;' prevents the last line from being deleted on OSX sed. Also works on gnu sed. – parleer Apr 1 at 17:04
  • Thanks, just so you know this is still useful info. – Jeff Adamson Jul 23 at 21:08
14
grep -A1 . <yourfile> | grep -v "^--$"

This grep solution works assuming you want the following:

Input

line1

line2
line3


line4



line5

Output

line1

line2
line3

line4

line5
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  • I like it, very elegant solution – duckyflip May 29 '09 at 0:24
  • 3
    Frickin' brilliant, actually. I wouldn't have come up with this in a million years. Nice work. A slightly more robust version goes like this of course (to handle non-empty blank lines): grep -v -A1 '^[[:blank:]]*$' <file> | grep -v '^--$' – Dan Moulding May 29 '09 at 3:43
11

Actually, if you replace multiple newlines with a single newline, the output would be:

something
something else
something else again

You can achieve this by:

sed /^$/d FILE
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  • This is correct, obviously :) What OP likely meant is to replace multiple "blank" (note that this is not necessarily empty, since lines can have invisible white space) with one empty line (which unless it is at the beginning or end of the sequence) means two newline chars. – arielf Jun 25 '16 at 20:59
3

A solution with awk, which replaces several blank lines with a single blank line:

awk 'BEGIN{bl=0}/^$/{bl++;if(bl==1)print;else next}/^..*$/{bl=0;print}' myfile
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3

Usually, if I find that sed can't do something I need, I turn to awk:

awk '
BEGIN {
    blank = 0;
}

/^[[:blank:]]*$/ {
     if (!blank) {
          print;
     }
     blank = 1;
     next;
}

{
     print;
     blank = 0;
}' file
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3

This uses marco's solution on multiple files:

for i in *; do FILE=$(cat -s "$i"); echo "$FILE" > "$i"; done
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2

If someone want use perl

perl -00pe0 < file

will do the same, as cat -s :)

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1

Use python:

s = file("filename.txt").read()
while "\n\n\n" in s: s = s.replace("\n\n\n", "\n\n")
import sys
sys.stdout.write(s)
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  • this is inefficient while loop – user5672998 Dec 15 '17 at 9:49
1

Python, with regular expression:

import re
import sys
sys.stdout.write(re.sub('\n{2,}','\n\n', sys.stdin.read()))
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1

Use awk:

awk '{ /^\s*$/?b++:b=0; if (b<=1) print }' file

Breakdown:

/^\s*$/?b++:b=0
    - ? :       the ternary operator
    - /^\s*$/   matches a blank line
    - b         variable that counts consecutive blank lines (b++).
                however, if the current line is non-blank, b is reset to 0.


if (b<=1) print
    print if the current line is non-blank (b==0)
          or if there is only one blank line (b==1).

By adjusting the regex, you can generalize it to other scenarios like squeezing multiple blank lines (">") in email: https://stackoverflow.com/a/59189823/12483961

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-1

Super easy to do with vim. Just open the file and type the following:

:%s/\n\n\n*/\r\r/

That will reduce all blocks of more than 2 new lines to 2 new lines. Hope this helps!

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-3

I take it that you'll probably want to remove lines that only have whitespace.

That can be done with:

sed /^[:space:]*$/d FILE
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-5

Pipelining it to |uniq may be solution (if other than empty lines don't duplicate)

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