255

I am wondering how you can get the system CPU usage and present it in percent using bash, for example.

Sample output:

57%

In case there is more than one core, it would be nice if an average percentage could be calculated.

15
  • 1
    @julesanchez the value needs to be piped somewhere else, hence it must be an int Feb 10, 2012 at 14:34
  • doing top > myfile.txt And applying your filter in post-treatment, is not ok ?
    – JuSchz
    Feb 10, 2012 at 14:35
  • 14
    A command that doesn't require sysstat: ps -A -o pcpu | tail -n+2 | paste -sd+ | bc
    – RFon
    Mar 3, 2015 at 13:30
  • 18
    Reopening I don't understand why this was ruled as off-topic, could the ones who closed it please care to elaborate?
    – Jonathan H
    Sep 30, 2015 at 16:44
  • 5
    My understanding of /proc/stat is very limited, but this one-liner works good enough for me: cat <(grep 'cpu ' /proc/stat) <(sleep 1 && grep 'cpu ' /proc/stat) | awk -v RS="" '{printf "%.2f%\n", ($13-$2+$15-$4)*100/($13-$2+$15-$4+$16-$5)}'. With %.2f you can control the number of decimals you want to output, and with sleep 1 you can set the time you want to average over, that is, if it does what I think it does. You can put it in a bash while loop, to test it in realtime.
    – Yeti
    Apr 25, 2016 at 20:26

6 Answers 6

233

Take a look at cat /proc/stat

grep 'cpu ' /proc/stat | awk '{usage=($2+$4)*100/($2+$4+$5)} END {print usage "%"}'

EDIT please read comments before copy-paste this or using this for any serious work. This was not tested nor used, it's an idea for people who do not want to install a utility or for something that works in any distribution. Some people think you can "apt-get install" anything.

NOTE: this is not the current CPU usage, but the overall CPU usage in all the cores since the system bootup. This could be very different from the current CPU usage. To get the current value top (or similar tool) must be used.

Current CPU usage can be potentially calculated with:

awk '{u=$2+$4; t=$2+$4+$5; if (NR==1){u1=u; t1=t;} else print ($2+$4-u1) * 100 / (t-t1) "%"; }' \
<(grep 'cpu ' /proc/stat) <(sleep 1;grep 'cpu ' /proc/stat)
28
  • 12
    But you have to install mpstat like you recommend above. Many people don't have that flexibility. cat /proc/stat then pipe is much easier than mpstat you recommend.
    – vimdude
    Mar 22, 2013 at 13:13
  • 12
    +1 Don't understand why parsing another utility is better than parsing /proc/stat Feb 26, 2014 at 18:31
  • 9
    system + user + idle = 100%. So maybe something like: grep 'cpu ' /proc/stat | awk '{cpu_usage=($2+$4)*100/($2+$4+$5)} END {print cpu_usage "%"}'
    – vimdude
    Jun 2, 2014 at 18:51
  • 120
    I think that this solution doesn't show the current CPU load but the average cpu load since the CPU started.
    – Etienne
    Sep 11, 2014 at 15:54
  • 11
    @jlliagre, yes that's right. To calculate the CURRENT cpu usage not average, you will need to take $1 value then delay then take $1 value and see the difference. That's the current cpu usage.
    – vimdude
    Aug 19, 2015 at 15:11
122

You can try:

top -bn1 | grep "Cpu(s)" | \
           sed "s/.*, *\([0-9.]*\)%* id.*/\1/" | \
           awk '{print 100 - $1"%"}'
33
  • 19
    Every time I run this command, I get the exact same output (32.7%).
    – alanaktion
    Jul 18, 2013 at 1:58
  • 16
    A more accurate result is given when I use top -bn2, but it takes a long time. From what I've read, this seems to be the only way to get an accurate result.
    – alanaktion
    Jul 18, 2013 at 2:10
  • 7
    top -bn1 seems wildly inaccurate on my FC20 system. top -bn2 seems to work well. Feb 19, 2014 at 0:58
  • 28
    The command in this answer appears to be written for systems where top -v returns procps-ng (e.g., Fedora). There's also procps, found on, e.g., Ubuntu and CentOS, where the command doesn't work (always indicates 100%, because parsing fails due to the line with the CPU figures being formatted differently). Here's a version that works with both implementations: top -b -n2 -p 1 | fgrep "Cpu(s)" | tail -1 | awk -F'id,' -v prefix="$prefix" '{ split($1, vs, ","); v=vs[length(vs)]; sub("%", "", v); printf "%s%.1f%%\n", prefix, 100 - v }'
    – mklement0
    Feb 21, 2014 at 4:15
  • 2
    Side note: on OSX, use the following: top -l 2 -n 0 -F | egrep -o ' \d*\.\d+% idle' | tail -1 | awk -F% -v prefix="$prefix" '{ printf "%s%.1f%%\n", prefix, 100 - $1 }'.
    – mklement0
    Feb 21, 2014 at 4:15
41

Try mpstat from the sysstat package

> sudo apt-get install sysstat
Linux 3.0.0-13-generic (ws025)  02/10/2012  _x86_64_    (2 CPU)  

03:33:26 PM  CPU    %usr   %nice    %sys %iowait    %irq   %soft  %steal  %guest   %idle
03:33:26 PM  all    2.39    0.04    0.19    0.34    0.00    0.01    0.00    0.00   97.03

Then some cutor grepto parse the info you need:

mpstat | grep -A 5 "%idle" | tail -n 1 | awk -F " " '{print 100 -  $ 12}'a
12
  • 2
    I don't beleive this shows the total CPU Feb 10, 2012 at 14:36
  • I'd say it 100-%idle that's the total CPU usage (in %) Feb 10, 2012 at 14:38
  • That's the percentage "not" used. This answer was good, up until the grep | tail | awk part...
    – jordanm
    Feb 10, 2012 at 14:47
  • I'd change the awk part to: awk -F " " '{print (100 - $12)"%"}', which gives the output formatted like he wanted, but otherwise this looks good to me.
    – Dan Fego
    Feb 10, 2012 at 14:52
  • 1
    @jordanm All truths; I was more voting it up because it works. I'd do this, personally: mpstat | awk '$12 ~ /[0-9.]+/ { print 100 - $12 }'
    – Dan Fego
    Feb 10, 2012 at 15:06
33

Might as well throw up an actual response with my solution, which was inspired by Peter Liljenberg's:

$ mpstat | awk '$12 ~ /[0-9.]+/ { print 100 - $12"%" }'
0.75%

This will use awk to print out 100 minus the 12th field (idle), with a percentage sign after it. awk will only do this for a line where the 12th field has numbers and dots only ($12 ~ /[0-9]+/).

You can also average five samples, one second apart:

$ mpstat 1 5 | awk 'END{print 100-$NF"%"}'

Test it like this:

$ mpstat 1 5 | tee /dev/tty | awk 'END{print 100-$NF"%"}'
5
  • 19
    Its better to run "mpstat 2 1 |..." so that it shows stats for the last 1 second. Otherwise, by default, mpstat shows stats since beginning and that does not change much as time progresses
    – Sarang
    Jul 19, 2013 at 19:56
  • 2
    "mpstat | awk '$12 ~ /[0-9.]+/ { print 100 - $11"%" }'" this work for me. Feb 26, 2014 at 9:05
  • @Sarang Thank you so much!! Finally I can get the results that conky is displaying as well. Unfortunately, this line is VERY slow, almost taking up to one whole second to execute. Sep 15, 2014 at 1:35
  • 7
    @syntaxerror It takes exactly 2 seconds because if you look at the command help you see that the first argument is that it's the interval but it only executes once because of the second argument so it waits 2 full seconds until it returns the result. Jan 30, 2015 at 11:16
  • Question is closed, so added my (similar) answer to yours :-) Hope you don't mind. Like you, I was inspired by Peter Liljenberg's answer.
    – PJ Brunet
    Apr 22, 2020 at 4:39
16

EDITED: I noticed that in another user's reply %idle was field 12 instead of field 11. The awk has been updated to account for the %idle field being variable.

This should get you the desired output:

mpstat | awk '$3 ~ /CPU/ { for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) { if ($i ~ /%idle/) field=i } } $3 ~ /all/ { print 100 - $field }'

If you want a simple integer rounding, you can use printf:

mpstat | awk '$3 ~ /CPU/ { for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) { if ($i ~ /%idle/) field=i } } $3 ~ /all/ { printf("%d%%",100 - $field) }'
2
  • 3
    mpstat 1 1 | awk '$3 ~ /CPU/ { for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) { if ($i ~ /%idle/) field=i } } $3 ~ /all/ { printf("%d",100 - $field) }' works great for me, thanks. note the mpstat 1 1 to ensure that the cpu usage is sampled over a second Jun 7, 2015 at 6:28
  • 1
    If you have jq: mpstat -o JSON -u 1 1 | jq '.sysstat.hosts[0].statistics[0]["cpu-load"][0].idle'
    – nyet
    Mar 29, 2019 at 1:21
6

Do this to see the overall CPU usage. This calls python3 and uses the cross-platform psutil module.

printf "%b" "import psutil\nprint('{}%'.format(psutil.cpu_percent(interval=2)))" | python3

The interval=2 part says to measure the total CPU load over a blocking period of 2 seconds.

Sample output:

9.4%

The python program it contains is this:

import psutil

print('{}%'.format(psutil.cpu_percent(interval=2)))

Placing time in front of the call proves it takes the specified interval time of about 2 seconds in this case. Here is the call and output:

$ time printf "%b" "import psutil\nprint('{}%'.format(psutil.cpu_percent(interval=2)))" | python3
9.5%

real    0m2.127s
user    0m0.119s
sys 0m0.008s

To view the output for individual cores as well, let's use this python program below. First, I obtain a python list (array) of "per CPU" information, then I average everything in that list to get a "total % CPU" type value. Then I print the total and the individual core percents.

Python program:

import psutil

cpu_percent_cores = psutil.cpu_percent(interval=2, percpu=True)
avg = sum(cpu_percent_cores)/len(cpu_percent_cores)
cpu_percent_total_str = ('%.2f' % avg) + '%'
cpu_percent_cores_str = [('%.2f' % x) + '%' for x in cpu_percent_cores]
print('Total: {}'.format(cpu_percent_total_str))
print('Individual CPUs: {}'.format('  '.join(cpu_percent_cores_str)))

This can be wrapped up into an incredibly ugly 1-line bash script like this if you like. I had to be sure to use only single quotes (''), NOT double quotes ("") in the Python program in order to make this wrapping into a bash 1-liner work:

printf "%b" \
"\
import psutil\n\
cpu_percent_cores = psutil.cpu_percent(interval=2, percpu=True)\n\
avg = sum(cpu_percent_cores)/len(cpu_percent_cores)\n\
cpu_percent_total_str = ('%.2f' % avg) + '%'\n\
cpu_percent_cores_str = [('%.2f' % x) + '%' for x in cpu_percent_cores]\n\
print('Total: {}'.format(cpu_percent_total_str))\n\
print('Individual CPUs: {}'.format('  '.join(cpu_percent_cores_str)))\n\
" | python3

Sample output: notice that I have 8 cores, so there are 8 numbers after "Individual CPUs:":

Total: 10.15%
Individual CPUs: 11.00%  8.50%  11.90%  8.50%  9.90%  7.60%  11.50%  12.30%

For more information on how the psutil.cpu_percent(interval=2) python call works, see the official psutil.cpu_percent(interval=None, percpu=False) documentation here:

psutil.cpu_percent(interval=None, percpu=False)

Return a float representing the current system-wide CPU utilization as a percentage. When interval is > 0.0 compares system CPU times elapsed before and after the interval (blocking). When interval is 0.0 or None compares system CPU times elapsed since last call or module import, returning immediately. That means the first time this is called it will return a meaningless 0.0 value which you are supposed to ignore. In this case it is recommended for accuracy that this function be called with at least 0.1 seconds between calls. When percpu is True returns a list of floats representing the utilization as a percentage for each CPU. First element of the list refers to first CPU, second element to second CPU and so on. The order of the list is consistent across calls.

Warning: the first time this function is called with interval = 0.0 or None it will return a meaningless 0.0 value which you are supposed to ignore.

Going further:

I use the above code in my cpu_logger.py script in my eRCaGuy_dotfiles repo.

References:

  1. Stack Overflow: How to get current CPU and RAM usage in Python?
  2. Stack Overflow: Executing multi-line statements in the one-line command-line?
  3. How to display a float with two decimal places?
  4. Finding the average of a list

Related

  1. https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/295599/how-to-show-processes-that-use-more-than-30-cpu/295608#295608
  2. https://askubuntu.com/questions/22021/how-to-log-cpu-load

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