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I have a very simple JavaScript array that may or may not contain duplicates.

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];

I need to remove the duplicates and put the unique values in a new array.

I could point to all the codes that I've tried but I think it's useless because they don't work. I accept jQuery solutions too.

Similar question:

marked as duplicate by Samuel Liew javascript Nov 15 '17 at 10:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 51
    _.uniq(peoplenames) solves this lodash.com/docs#uniq – Connor Leech Jul 29 '14 at 19:29
  • 5
    @ConnorLeech its easy with lodash but not optimized way – Suhail Mumtaz Awan May 16 '17 at 10:35
  • Best Solution has simple converting array to object, with object keys be arrary elements, value of each key let say "true". Then just convert back to array with Object.keys(obj_name) – nirbhaygp Dec 30 '17 at 13:46
  • 2
    @SuhailMumtazAwan that's not necessarily true, authors of lodash think about perf as well. Example on a random 1000 element array of numbers between 0-10: jsperf.com/lodash-es6set-unique-array Perf is quite close – xlm Sep 4 '18 at 23:26
  • 7
    The simplest approach (in my opinion) is to use the Set object which lets you store unique values of any type. In other words, Set will automatically remove duplicates for us. const names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"]; let unique = [...new Set(names)]; console.log(unique); // 'Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Carl' – Asif vora Dec 10 '18 at 10:43

54 Answers 54

3

A slight modification of thg435's excellent answer to use a custom comparator:

function contains(array, obj) {
    for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        if (isEqual(array[i], obj)) return true;
    }
    return false;
}
//comparator
function isEqual(obj1, obj2) {
    if (obj1.name == obj2.name) return true;
    return false;
}
function removeDuplicates(ary) {
    var arr = [];
    return ary.filter(function(x) {
        return !contains(arr, x) && arr.push(x);
    });
}
3

Although ES6 Solution is the best, I'm baffled as to how nobody has shown the following solution:

function removeDuplicates(arr){
    o={}
    arr.forEach(function(e){
        o[e]=true
    })
    return Object.keys(o)
}

The thing to remember here is that objects MUST have unique keys. We are exploiting this to remove all the duplicates. I would have thought this would be the fastest solution (before ES6).

Bear in mind though that this also sorts the array.

2

For anyone looking to flatten arrays with duplicate elements into one unique array:

function flattenUniq(arrays) {
  var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);

  var array = [].concat.apply([], args)

  var result = array.reduce(function(prev, curr){
    if (prev.indexOf(curr) < 0) prev.push(curr);
    return prev;
  },[]);

  return result;
}
1

Another method of doing this without writing much code is using the ES5 Object.keys-method:

var arrayWithDuplicates = ['a','b','c','d','a','c'],
    deduper = {};
arrayWithDuplicates.forEach(function (item) {
    deduper[item] = null;
});
var dedupedArray = Object.keys(deduper); // ["a", "b", "c", "d"]

Extracted in a function

function removeDuplicates (arr) {
    var deduper = {}
    arr.forEach(function (item) {
        deduper[item] = null;
    });
    return Object.keys(deduper);
}
  • This doesn't work. You aren't using arrayWithDuplicates anywhere. – Oriol Dec 10 '14 at 15:51
  • @Oriol Sorry about that, I forgot one line. I edited the example. – Willem de Wit Dec 11 '14 at 9:58
1

The simplest way to remove a duplicate is to do a for loop and compare the elements that are not the same and push them into the new array

 var array = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];

 var removeDublicate = function(arr){
 var result = []
 var sort_arr = arr.sort() //=> optional
 for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        if(arr[ i + 1] !== arr[i] ){
            result.push(arr[i])
        }
 };
  return result
}  
console.log(removeDublicate(array))
==>  ["Adam", "Carl", "Jenny", "Matt", "Mike", "Nancy"]
1

The following script returns a new array containing only unique values. It works on string and numbers. No requirement for additional libraries only vanilla JS.

Browser support:

Feature Chrome  Firefox (Gecko)     Internet Explorer   Opera   Safari
Basic support   (Yes)   1.5 (1.8)   9                   (Yes)   (Yes)

https://jsfiddle.net/fzmcgcxv/3/

var duplicates = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl","Mike","Mike","Nancy","Carl"]; 
var unique = duplicates.filter(function(elem, pos) {
    return duplicates.indexOf(elem) == pos;
  }); 
alert(unique);
1

Nested loop method for removing duplicates in array and preserving original order of elements.

var array = [1, 3, 2, 1, [5], 2, [4]]; // INPUT

var element = 0;
var decrement = array.length - 1;
while(element < array.length) {
  while(element < decrement) {
    if (array[element] === array[decrement]) {
      array.splice(decrement, 1);
      decrement--;
    } else {
      decrement--;
    }
  }
  decrement = array.length - 1;
  element++;
}

console.log(array);// [1, 3, 2, [5], [4]]

Explanation: Inner loop compares first element of array with all other elements starting with element at highest index. Decrementing towards the first element a duplicate is spliced from the array.

When inner loop is finished the outer loop increments to the next element for comparison and resets the new length of the array.

1
function arrayDuplicateRemove(arr){
    var c = 0;
    var tempArray = [];
    console.log(arr);
    arr.sort();
    console.log(arr);
    for (var i = arr.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if(arr[i] != tempArray[c-1]){
            tempArray.push(arr[i])
            c++;
        }
    };
    console.log(tempArray);
    tempArray.sort();
    console.log(tempArray);
}
1
const numbers = [1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4];

function unique(array) {
  return array.reduce((a,b) => {
    let isIn = a.find(element => {
        return element === b;
    });
    if(!isIn){
      a.push(b);
    }
    return a;
  },[]);
}

let ret = unique(numbers); // [1, 2, 3, 4]

the way using reduce and find.

0

Here is another approach using jQuery,

function uniqueArray(array){
  if ($.isArray(array)){
    var dupes = {}; var len, i;
    for (i=0,len=array.length;i<len;i++){
      var test = array[i].toString();
      if (dupes[test]) { array.splice(i,1); len--; i--; } else { dupes[test] = true; }
    }
  } 
  else {
    if (window.console) console.log('Not passing an array to uniqueArray, returning whatever you sent it - not filtered!');
      return(array);
  }
  return(array);
}

Author: William Skidmore

0
function removeDuplicates(inputArray) {
            var outputArray=new Array();

            if(inputArray.length>0){
                jQuery.each(inputArray, function(index, value) {
                    if(jQuery.inArray(value, outputArray) == -1){
                        outputArray.push(value);
                    }
                });
            }           
            return outputArray;
        }
0

If you don't want to include a whole library, you can use this one off to add a method that any array can use:

Array.prototype.uniq = function uniq() {
  return this.reduce(function(accum, cur) { 
    if (accum.indexOf(cur) === -1) accum.push(cur); 
    return accum; 
  }, [] );
}

["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"].uniq()
0

If you're creating the array yourself, you can save yourself a loop and the extra unique filter by doing the check as you're inserting the data;

var values = [];
$.each(collection, function() {
    var x = $(this).value;
    if (!$.inArray(x, values)) {
        values.push(x);
    }
});
  • Be careful with using the jQuery inArray method: it returns the index of the element in array, not a boolean value. Check the documentation: jQuery.inArray() – xonya Apr 24 '15 at 8:52
0

The easiest way to remove string duplicates is to use associative array and then iterate over the associative array to make the list/array back.

Like below:

var toHash = [];
var toList = [];

// add from ur data list to hash
$(data.pointsToList).each(function(index, Element) {
    toHash[Element.nameTo]= Element.nameTo;
});

// now convert hash to array
// don't forget the "hasownproperty" else u will get random results 
for (var key in toHash)  {
    if (toHash.hasOwnProperty(key)) { 
      toList.push(toHash[key]);
   }
}

Voila, now duplicates are gone!

0

I know Im a little late, but here is another option using jinqJs

See Fiddle

var result = jinqJs().from(["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"]).distinct().select();
0

Vanilla JS solutions with complexity of O(n) (fastest possible for this problem). Modify the hashFunction to distinguish the objects (e.g. 1 and "1") if needed. The first solution avoids hidden loops (common in functions provided by Array).

var dedupe = function(a) 
{
    var hash={},ret=[];
    var hashFunction = function(v) { return ""+v; };
    var collect = function(h)
    {
        if(hash.hasOwnProperty(hashFunction(h)) == false) // O(1)
        {
            hash[hashFunction(h)]=1;
            ret.push(h); // should be O(1) for Arrays
            return;
        }
    };

    for(var i=0; i<a.length; i++) // this is a loop: O(n)
        collect(a[i]);
    //OR: a.forEach(collect); // this is a loop: O(n)

    return ret;
}

var dedupe = function(a) 
{
    var hash={};
    var isdupe = function(h)
    {
        if(hash.hasOwnProperty(h) == false) // O(1)
        {
            hash[h]=1;
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    };

    return a.filter(isdupe); // this is a loop: O(n)
}
0
var duplicates = function(arr){
     var sorted = arr.sort();
   var dup = [];
   for(var i=0; i<sorted.length; i++){
        var rest  = sorted.slice(i+1); //slice the rest of array
       if(rest.indexOf(sorted[i]) > -1){//do indexOf
            if(dup.indexOf(sorted[i]) == -1)    
         dup.push(sorted[i]);//store it in another arr
      }
   }
   console.log(dup);
}

duplicates(["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"]);
0
function removeDuplicates (array) {
  var sorted = array.slice().sort()
  var result = []

  sorted.forEach((item, index) => {
    if (sorted[index + 1] !== item) {
      result.push(item)
    }
  })
  return result
}
0
var lines = ["Mike", "Matt", "Nancy", "Adam", "Jenny", "Nancy", "Carl"];
var uniqueNames = [];

for(var i=0;i<lines.length;i++)
{
    if(uniqueNames.indexOf(lines[i]) == -1)
        uniqueNames.push(lines[i]);
}
if(uniqueNames.indexOf(uniqueNames[uniqueNames.length-1])!= -1)
    uniqueNames.pop();
for(var i=0;i<uniqueNames.length;i++)
{
    document.write(uniqueNames[i]);
      document.write("<br/>");
}
  • Your code works great. but the code 'uniqueNames.pop()' is removing the last array element for no reason. It makes the 'Carl' not listing from the array. – Santosh Mar 16 '17 at 17:51
0

Quick and Easy using lodash - var array = ["12346","12347","12348","12349","12349"]; console.log(_.uniqWith(array,_.isEqual));

0

aLinks is a simple JavaScript array object. If any element exist before the elements on which the index shows that a duplicate record deleted. I repeat to cancel all duplicates. One passage array cancel more records.

var srt_ = 0;
var pos_ = 0;
do {
    var srt_ = 0;
    for (var i in aLinks) {
        pos_ = aLinks.indexOf(aLinks[i].valueOf(), 0);
        if (pos_ < i) {
            delete aLinks[i];
            srt_++;
        }
    }
} while (srt_ != 0);
0

This solution uses a new array, and an object map inside the function. All it does is loop through the original array, and adds each integer into the object map.If while looping through the original array it comes across a repeat, the

`if (!unique[int])`

catches this because there is already a key property on the object with the same number. Thus, skipping over that number and not allowing it to be pushed into the new array.

    function removeRepeats(ints) {
      var unique = {}
      var newInts = []

      for (var i = 0; i < ints.length; i++) {
        var int = ints[i]

        if (!unique[int]) {
          unique[int] = 1
          newInts.push(int)
        }
      }
      return newInts
    }

    var example = [100, 100, 100, 100, 500]
    console.log(removeRepeats(example)) // prints [100, 500]
0
var uniqueCompnies = function(companyArray) {
    var arrayUniqueCompnies = [],
        found, x, y;

    for (x = 0; x < companyArray.length; x++) {
        found = undefined;
        for (y = 0; y < arrayUniqueCompnies.length; y++) {
            if (companyArray[x] === arrayUniqueCompnies[y]) {
                found = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        if ( ! found) {
            arrayUniqueCompnies.push(companyArray[x]);
        }
    }

    return arrayUniqueCompnies;
}

var arr = [
    "Adobe Systems Incorporated",
    "IBX",
    "IBX",
    "BlackRock, Inc.",
    "BlackRock, Inc.",
];
  • 1
    Please format the whole post – Alexey Subach Mar 22 '17 at 14:04
-5

ES2015, 1-liner, which chains well with map, but only works for integers:

[1, 4, 1].sort().filter((current, next) => current !== next)

[1, 4]

  • That works with anything, but only removes sequential duplicates. e.g. [1,1,2,2,3,3] -> [1,2,3] but [1,2,3,1,2,3] -> [1,2,3,1,2,3] – Kroltan Oct 5 '17 at 16:18
  • 2
    @Kroltan It's actually not a matter of sequential duplicates, but it's a big issue about understanding what's passed to filter: it's (value, index) not (current, next), so it would work for [1,4,1] but not for [2,4,2]... – Xenos Dec 20 '17 at 10:34
  • @Xenos You're right! I skimmed over it too fast xD – Kroltan Dec 20 '17 at 20:17

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