67

How can I round up a number to the second decimal place in python? For example:

0.022499999999999999

Should round up to 0.03

0.1111111111111000

Should round up to 0.12

If there is any value in the third decimal place, I want it to always round up leaving me 2 values behind the decimal point.

3

13 Answers 13

55

Python includes the round() function which lets you specify the number of digits you want. From the documentation:

round(x[, n])

Return the floating point value x rounded to n digits after the decimal point. If n is omitted, it defaults to zero. The result is a floating point number. Values are rounded to the closest multiple of 10 to the power minus n; if two multiples are equally close, rounding is done away from 0 (so. for example, round(0.5) is 1.0 and round(-0.5) is -1.0).

So you would want to use round(x, 2) to do normal rounding. To ensure that the number is always rounded up you would need to use the ceil(x) function. Similarly, to round down use floor(x).

3
  • 24
    Good suggestion, but it doesn't round up as the OP seems to require.
    – NPE
    Feb 10, 2012 at 17:45
  • 1
    "Round up" isn't the same as normal rounding. Look at the examples in the question. Feb 10, 2012 at 17:46
  • @Mark Because adding in the exact code to do ceil would mean copying your answer, I'm leaving mine as (almost) is and upvoting yours.
    – user830639
    Feb 10, 2012 at 17:58
37
from math import ceil

num = 0.1111111111000
num = ceil(num * 100) / 100.0

See:
math.ceil documentation
round documentation - You'll probably want to check this out anyway for future reference

4
  • You don't need round() here -- it won't change the result in any way. Feb 10, 2012 at 17:49
  • 11
    Gives wrong results in following cases: math.ceil((1.11 * 100.0)) / 100.0 comes out to be 1.12 Because: 1.11 * 100.0 has value 111.00000000000001 Feb 23, 2017 at 15:59
  • 2
    @nimeshkiranverma see Is floating point math broken? Use the decimal module if you need exact decimal results. Nov 16, 2017 at 14:16
  • 1
    Based on the observation made by @nimeshkiranverma, you do need round() to get the desired result: math.ceil(round(1.11 * 100.0)) / 100.0 Dec 9, 2020 at 4:32
26
x = math.ceil(x * 100.0) / 100.0
1
  • 3
    I had to stare at this for a while before I realized this is even more pythonic than my solution.
    – Edwin
    Feb 10, 2012 at 17:49
23

Updated answer:
The problem with my original answer, as pointed out in the comments by @jpm, is the behavior at the boundaries. Python 3 makes this even more difficult since it uses "bankers" rounding instead of "old school" rounding. However, in looking into this issue I discovered an even better solution using the decimal library.

import decimal

def round_up(x, place=0):
    context = decimal.getcontext()
    # get the original setting so we can put it back when we're done
    original_rounding = context.rounding
    # change context to act like ceil()
    context.rounding = decimal.ROUND_CEILING

    rounded = round(decimal.Decimal(str(x)), place)
    context.rounding = original_rounding
    return float(rounded)

Or if you really just want a one-liner:

import decimal
decimal.getcontext().rounding = decimal.ROUND_CEILING

# here's the one-liner
float(round(decimal.Decimal(str(0.1111)), ndigits=2))
>> 0.12

# Note: this only affects the rounding of `Decimal`
round(0.1111, ndigits=2)
>> 0.11

Here are some examples:

round_up(0.022499999999999999, 2)
>> 0.03
round_up(0.1111111111111000, 2)
>> 0.12
round_up(0.1111111111111000, 3)
>> 0.112

round_up(3.4)
>> 4.0

# @jpm - boundaries do what we want
round_up(0.1, 2)
>> 0.1
round_up(1.1, 2)
>> 1.1

# Note: this still rounds toward `inf`, not "away from zero"
round_up(2.049, 2)
>> 2.05
round_up(-2.0449, 2)
>> -2.04

We can use it to round to the left of the decimal as well:

round_up(11, -1)
>> 20

We don't multiply by 10, thereby avoiding the overflow mentioned in this answer.

round_up(1.01e308, -307)
>> 1.1e+308

Original Answer (Not recommended):
This depends on the behavior you want when considering positive and negative numbers, but if you want something that always rounds to a larger value (e.g. 2.0449 -> 2.05, -2.0449 -> -2.04) then you can do:

round(x + 0.005, 2)

or a little fancier:

def round_up(x, place):
    return round(x + 5 * 10**(-1 * (place + 1)), place)

This also seems to work as follows:

round(144, -1)
# 140
round_up(144, -1)
# 150
round_up(1e308, -307)
# 1.1e308
3
  • 1
    This is not guaranteed to work... An example: round(0.1 + 0.005, 2) == 0.11 whereas round(1.1 + 0.005, 2) == 1.10
    – jpm
    Apr 16, 2020 at 4:43
  • @jpm: Good point. I looked into it and it turns out the boundaries are hard to deal with correctly using round, especially now that round uses "bankers" rounding instead of "old school rounding". I've updated my answer with a better solution.
    – ajp619
    Apr 17, 2020 at 15:10
  • This answer could be improved by specifying which rounding you mean with "oldschool": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rounding and removing the quotation marks around bankers rounding
    – Hakaishin
    Jan 12, 2023 at 9:29
15

Extrapolating from Edwin's answer:

from math import ceil, floor
def float_round(num, places = 0, direction = floor):
    return direction(num * (10**places)) / float(10**places)

To use:

>>> float_round(0.21111, 3, ceil)  #round up
>>> 0.212
>>> float_round(0.21111, 3)        #round down
>>> 0.211
>>> float_round(0.21111, 3, round) #round naturally
>>> 0.211
1
  • 8
    Gives wrong results in following cases: math.ceil((1.11 * 100.0)) / 100.0 comes out to be 1.12 Because: 1.11 * 100.0 has value 111.00000000000001 Feb 23, 2017 at 15:59
5

Note that the ceil(num * 100) / 100 trick will crash on some degenerate inputs, like 1e308. This may not come up often but I can tell you it just cost me a couple of days. To avoid this, "it would be nice if" ceil() and floor() took a decimal places argument, like round() does... Meanwhile, anyone know a clean alternative that won't crash on inputs like this? I had some hopes for the decimal package but it seems to die too:

>>> from math import ceil
>>> from decimal import Decimal, ROUND_DOWN, ROUND_UP
>>> num = 0.1111111111000
>>> ceil(num * 100) / 100
0.12
>>> float(Decimal(num).quantize(Decimal('.01'), rounding=ROUND_UP))
0.12
>>> num = 1e308
>>> ceil(num * 100) / 100
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 301, in runcode
  File "<interactive input>", line 1, in <module>
OverflowError: cannot convert float infinity to integer
>>> float(Decimal(num).quantize(Decimal('.01'), rounding=ROUND_UP))
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 301, in runcode
  File "<interactive input>", line 1, in <module>
decimal.InvalidOperation: [<class 'decimal.InvalidOperation'>]

Of course one might say that crashing is the only sane behavior on such inputs, but I would argue that it's not the rounding but the multiplication that's causing the problem (that's why, eg, 1e306 doesn't crash), and a cleaner implementation of the round-up-nth-place fn would avoid the multiplication hack.

1
  • The problem you're running into with this use of Decimal is that the result of the quantize expression needs 311 digits to express, and the current precision is too small. If you do a from decimal import getcontext; getcontext().prec = 400 beforehand, this will "work", for some value of "work". Or you could note that any float larger than 2**52 in absolute value must already be an integer, so the rounding will have no effect. And yes, I agree it would nice if "ceil" and "floor" took a decimal places argument. Aug 30, 2015 at 16:56
5

The python round function could be rounding the way not you expected.

You can be more specific about the rounding method by using Decimal.quantize

eg.

from decimal import Decimal, ROUND_HALF_UP
res = Decimal('0.25').quantize(Decimal('0.0'), rounding=ROUND_HALF_UP)
print(res) 
# prints 0.3

More reference:

https://gist.github.com/jackiekazil/6201722

3

Here is a more general one-liner that works for any digits:

import math
def ceil(number, digits) -> float: return math.ceil((10.0 ** digits) * number) / (10.0 ** digits)

Example usage:

>>> ceil(1.111111, 2)
1.12

Caveat: as stated by nimeshkiranverma:

>>> ceil(1.11, 2) 
1.12  #Because: 1.11 * 100.0 has value 111.00000000000001
2
def round_up(number, ndigits=None):
    # start by just rounding the number, as sometimes this rounds it up
    result = round(number, ndigits if ndigits else 0)
    if result < number:
        # whoops, the number was rounded down instead, so correct for that
        if ndigits:
            # use the type of number provided, e.g. float, decimal, fraction
            Numerical = type(number)
            # add the digit 1 in the correct decimal place
            result += Numerical(10) ** -ndigits
            # may need to be tweaked slightly if the addition was inexact
            result = round(result, ndigits)
        else:
            result += 1 # same as 10 ** -0 for precision of zero digits
    return result

assert round_up(0.022499999999999999, 2) == 0.03
assert round_up(0.1111111111111000, 2) == 0.12

assert round_up(1.11, 2) == 1.11
assert round_up(1e308, 2) == 1e308
2
  • 1
    You should add comments in your code to describe what you did
    – Michael
    Apr 4, 2018 at 16:01
  • Is that better? Apr 4, 2018 at 18:58
0

Here's a simple way to do it that I don't see in the other answers.

To round up to the second decimal place:

>>> n = 0.022499999999999999
>>> 
>>> -(-n//.01) * .01
0.03
>>> 

Other value:

>>> n = 0.1111111111111000
>>> 
>>> -(-n//.01) * .01
0.12
>>> 

With floats there's the occasional value with some minute imprecision, which can be corrected for if you're displaying the values for instance:

>>> n = 10.1111111111111000
>>> 
>>> -(-n//0.01) * 0.01
10.120000000000001
>>> 
>>> f"{-(-n//0.01) * 0.01:.2f}"
'10.12'
>>> 

A simple roundup function with a parameter to specify precision:

>>> roundup = lambda n, p: -(-n//10**-p) * 10**-p
>>> 
>>> # Or if you want to ensure truncation using the f-string method:
>>> roundup = lambda n, p: float(f"{-(-n//10**-p) * 10**-p:.{p}f}")
>>> 
>>> roundup(0.111111111, 2)
0.12
>>> roundup(0.111111111, 3)
0.112
0

I wrote simple function for round_up:

def round_up(number: float, ndigits: int):
    offset = 0.5
    if ndigits and ndigits > 0:
        offset = offset / (10 ** ndigits)
        return round(number + offset, ndigits)
   else:
       return round(number+offset)
-1

The round funtion stated does not works for definate integers like :

a=8
round(a,3)
8.0
a=8.00
round(a,3)
8.0
a=8.000000000000000000000000
round(a,3)
8.0

but , works for :

r=400/3.0
r
133.33333333333334
round(r,3)
133.333

Morever the decimals like 2.675 are rounded as 2.67 not 2.68.
Better use the other method provided above.

1
  • This is not an answer but a comment. Please add this as a comment to the related answer
    – Ferro
    Jul 5, 2020 at 4:52
-1

def round_decimals_up(number:float, decimals:int=2): """ Returns a value rounded up to a specific number of decimal places. """ if not isinstance(decimals, int): raise TypeError("decimal places must be an integer") elif decimals < 0: raise ValueError("decimal places has to be 0 or more") elif decimals == 0: return math.ceil(number)

factor = 10 ** decimals
return math.ceil(number * factor) / factor

round_decimals_up(0.022499999999999999)

Returns: 0.03

round_decimals_up(0.1111111111111000)

Returns: 0.12

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