64

Assuming I have an Object ItemVO in which there a bunch of properties already assigned. eg:

ItemVO originalItemVO = new ItemVO();
originalItemVO.ItemId = 1;
originalItemVO.ItemCategory = "ORIGINAL";

I would like to create another duplicate by using :

duplicateItemVO = originalItemVO;

and then use the duplicateItemVO and alter its' properties, WITHOUT changing the originalItemVO:

// This also change the originalItemVO.ItemCategory which I do not want.
duplicateItemVO.ItemCategory = "DUPLICATE" 

How can I achieve this, without changing the class ItemVO ?

Thanks

public class ItemVO     
{
    public ItemVO()
    {
        ItemId = "";
        ItemCategory = "";
    }

    public string ItemId { get; set; }
    public string ItemCategory { get; set; }
}
1

8 Answers 8

38

In order to change one instance without changing the other you need to clone the actual values of this instance and not the reference. The pattern used in .Net is to implement ICloneable. So your code would look like this:

public class ItemVO: ICloneable
  {
    public ItemVO()
    {
        ItemId = ""; 
        ItemCategory = ""; 
    }

    public string ItemId { get; set; }
    public string ItemCategory { get; set; }

    public object Clone()
    {
        return new ItemVO
        {
            ItemId = this.ItemId,
            ItemCategory = this.ItemCategory
        }; 
    }
 }

Now notice that you need an explicit cast when using Clone() (or you can make your own that returns ItemVO).

duplicateItemVO = (ItemVO) originalItemVO.Clone(); 
3
  • This makes sense but assuming I cant change the class ItemVO , how else can I achieve this?
    – Gotcha
    Commented Feb 10, 2012 at 20:38
  • 1
    In this case you have one of two options: (1) extend the class and then implement the IColneable from the child class. (2) you have to recreate the object manually every time you need to assign it, to create the object manually you just use the same code in the Clone method. I presonally prefer the first option, specially if you end up doing this in many places. Commented Feb 10, 2012 at 21:16
  • Maybe evenduplicateItemVO = originalItemVO.Clone() as ItemVO; Commented Dec 17, 2019 at 14:50
29

To duplicate an object by value instead of reference, you can serialize it (e.g. JSON) and then deserialize it right after. You then have a copy by value.

Here's an example

ItemVO originalItemVO = new ItemVO();
originalItemVO.ItemId = 1;
originalItemVO.ItemCategory = "ORIGINAL";

string json = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(originalItemVO); 
ItemVO duplicateItemVO = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<ItemVO>(json);
2
  • 4
    Welcome to the SO! Please consider adding some explanation or commentary to your answer. Generally it is discourage to post an answer with just a raw code and nothing else. Additionally, if you answer a dated question with plenty of answer consider if you bring anything new to the topic (there is a very similar answer that uses de-serialization).
    – Aki
    Commented Jan 3, 2020 at 13:50
  • This has to be one of the slowest ways to do this. It looks clean, yet this goes over reflecting the objects/types in question and then performing costly serialization to text and back to memory. Reflection could at least do this directly on memory, without relying on text..
    – Vinz
    Commented Oct 7, 2022 at 16:45
27

You would need to construct a new instance of your class, not just assign the variable:

duplicateItemVO = new ItemVO 
    { 
        ItemId = originalItemVO.ItemId, 
        ItemCategory = originalItemVO.ItemCategory 
    };

When you're dealing with reference types (any class), just assigning a variable is creating a copy of the reference to the original object. As such, setting property values within that object will change the original as well. In order to prevent this, you need to actually construct a new object instance.

2
  • 1
    Is there another way rather than explicitly assigning each property in originalItemVO to duplicateItemVO? I've used an itemVO with 2 properties for simplicity... but I have about 30+
    – Gotcha
    Commented Feb 10, 2012 at 20:34
  • 3
    @Gotcha Create a constructor in your class that works off a second instance, and internally does the setting appropriately. That's the most maintainable method - then you'd just write: duplicateItemVO = new ItemVO(originalItemVO); Commented Feb 10, 2012 at 20:36
17

You cannot practically copy an object since they would more likely be of reference types. The ideal method is to serialize or stream the object into a new one - Provided your class is serializable (by providing the [Serializable] attribute in class declaration).

private static T Clone<T>(T source)
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsSerializable)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("The type must be serializable.", "source");
        }

        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(source, null))
        {
            return default(T);
        }

        System.Runtime.Serialization.IFormatter formatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
        Stream stream = new MemoryStream();
        using (stream)
        {
            formatter.Serialize(stream, source);
            stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
            return (T)formatter.Deserialize(stream);
        }
    }

Now you can use this code:

[Serializable]
public class MyClass
{
  public int a {get; set;}
  public int b {get; set;}
}     

var obj = new MyClass{
a = 10,
b = 20,
};

var newobj = Clone<MyClass>(obj);

You will get an entirely new copy of obj. Note: Any other class inside MyClass must also be declared with the attribute [Serializable].

2
  • 1
    Thanks for this handy tidbit! Have you checked the performance of this on a large object?
    – callisto
    Commented Feb 23, 2017 at 14:12
  • 1
    Yes, @callisto, I have tried this on large objects and as long as there is enough memory available, it works. Commented Feb 27, 2017 at 9:10
14

I suggest using as is in the link below. For me it worked very well.

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.memberwiseclone(v=vs.110).aspx

 public Person ShallowCopy ()
 {
    return (Person) this.MemberwiseClone ();
 }
0
5

class are reference type and when you change one instance it will change the ariginal refference. so use value type object for overcome your task(ex: use struct instead of class)

public struct ItemVO { *** }

or you can implement ICloneable Interface for your class

2
  • Right, i've figured this much... I'd rather not change this class to a struct to avoid other impact of this change. I'm only working on a small portion of the code which has this existing class...which I cannot modify. How else would i achieve this?
    – Gotcha
    Commented Feb 10, 2012 at 20:37
  • you can implement ICloneable Interface for your class Commented Feb 11, 2012 at 4:34
3

As of c# 4.5 the base class object contains a method called MemberwiseClone that enables you to perform a shallow copy of that object and returns the result as a new instance. (If a field is a value type, a bit-by-bit copy of the field is performed. If a field is a reference type, the reference is copied but the referred object is not; therefore, the original object and its clone refer to the same object.)

This is useful if you are looking to implement a prototype design pattern.

If you are looking to implement a deep copy (everything within the class is duplicated as new instances) then serialization or reflection are probably the best tools

2

By Default objects are reference type.

Assign the one object to another object its means that you just refer the address of the object.Any changes in any object it will reflect in both.

To solve this problem you should have initialize the object using "new" keyword, then add this object value in the first object.

1
  • Perhaps an example will add clarity to your answer.
    – mw509
    Commented May 14 at 13:00

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