36

I'm trying to inspect a buffer which contains a binary formatted message, but also contains string data. As an example, I'm using this C code:

int main (void) {
    char buf[100] = "\x01\x02\x03\x04String Data\xAA\xBB\xCC";

    return 0;
}

I'd like to get a hex dump of what's in buf, of a format similar to xxd (I don't care if it's an exact match, what I'm really looking for is a hex dump side by side with printable chars).

Inside GDB I can use something like:

(gdb) x /100bx buf
0x7fffffffdf00: 0x01    0x02    0x03    0x04    0x53    0x74    0x72    0x69
0x7fffffffdf08: 0x6e    0x67    0x20    0x44    0x61    0x74    0x61    0xaa
0x7fffffffdf10: 0xbb    0xcc    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf18: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf20: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf28: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf30: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf38: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf40: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf48: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf50: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00
0x7fffffffdf58: 0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00    0x00

which is fine, but it's hard to pick out strings that way... or I can use

(gdb) x /100bs buf
0x7fffffffdf00:  "\001\002\003\004String Data\252\273\314"
0x7fffffffdf13:  ""
0x7fffffffdf14:  ""
0x7fffffffdf15:  ""
0x7fffffffdf16:  ""
0x7fffffffdf17:  ""
...

which makes it hard to read the binary part... the actual messages I'm dealing with have plenty of ascii nul's in them, too, so really it just looks like a mess.

The best I can come up with is to do this:

(gdb) dump binary memory dump.bin buf buf+100

and then

$ xxd dump.bin
0000000: 0102 0304 5374 7269 6e67 2044 6174 61aa  ....String Data.
0000010: bbcc 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000020: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000030: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000040: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000050: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000060: 0000 0000                                ....

but that's a pain to do that every time. I figured somebody out there has wanted this before, so wondering if anybody has found a way to do it inside gdb. Plus you lose the addresses from the original memory this way.

I'm using GDB 7.4 with python support built in, so I'm open to the idea of using a pretty printer or similar, but I don't know how to set that up.

64
(gdb) define xxd
>dump binary memory dump.bin $arg0 $arg0+$arg1
>shell xxd dump.bin
>end
(gdb) xxd &j 10 
0000000: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 4d8c a7f7  ............M...
0000010: ff7f 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 c8d7 ffff  ................
0000020: ff7f 0000 0000 0000

Seems easy enough ;-)

You could likely write a Python script (modern GDB versions have embedded Python interpreter) to do the same, and get rid of the need to "shell out".

  • Ah, good thinking. Didn't realize it was that easy to add shortcuts like that into GDB. I ended up coding this up in python like you mentioned, but I'm sure I'll be able to put that idiom to use. – FatalError Feb 11 '12 at 4:18
  • 1
    Note that if $arg0 is a pointer to a struct, then $arg1 will be treated as a count of objects, not bytes. Use ((void *)$arg0)+$arg1 instead of $arg0+$arg1 if that's going to be a problem. – Roger Lipscombe Jan 30 '18 at 10:34
  • 2
    Also note that newer versions of xxd support the -o flag, which adds an offset to the address values displayed. – Roger Lipscombe Jan 30 '18 at 10:35
  • This has the major inconvenient of not preserving addresses! (I would recommened adding the addres -o flag as suggested by Roger) – cbodt Apr 19 '18 at 12:55
24

So, I ended up playing around with the python interface and came up with this:

import gdb
from curses.ascii import isgraph

def groups_of(iterable, size, first=0):
    first = first if first != 0 else size
    chunk, iterable = iterable[:first], iterable[first:]
    while chunk:
        yield chunk
        chunk, iterable = iterable[:size], iterable[size:]

class HexDump(gdb.Command):
    def __init__(self):
        super (HexDump, self).__init__ ('hex-dump', gdb.COMMAND_DATA)

    def invoke(self, arg, from_tty):
        argv = gdb.string_to_argv(arg)
        if len(argv) != 2:
            raise gdb.GdbError('hex-dump takes exactly 2 arguments.')
        addr = gdb.parse_and_eval(argv[0]).cast(
            gdb.lookup_type('void').pointer())
        try:
            bytes = int(gdb.parse_and_eval(argv[1]))
        except ValueError:
            raise gdb.GdbError('Byte count numst be an integer value.')

        inferior = gdb.selected_inferior()

        align = gdb.parameter('hex-dump-align')
        width = gdb.parameter('hex-dump-width')
        if width == 0:
            width = 16

        mem = inferior.read_memory(addr, bytes)
        pr_addr = int(str(addr), 16)
        pr_offset = width

        if align:
            pr_offset = width - (pr_addr % width)
            pr_addr -= pr_addr % width

        for group in groups_of(mem, width, pr_offset):
            print '0x%x: ' % (pr_addr,) + '   '*(width - pr_offset),
            print ' '.join(['%02X' % (ord(g),) for g in group]) + \
                '   ' * (width - len(group) if pr_offset == width else 0) + ' ',
            print ' '*(width - pr_offset) +  ''.join(
                [g if isgraph(g) or g == ' ' else '.' for g in group])
            pr_addr += width
            pr_offset = width

class HexDumpAlign(gdb.Parameter):
    def __init__(self):
        super (HexDumpAlign, self).__init__('hex-dump-align',
                                            gdb.COMMAND_DATA,
                                            gdb.PARAM_BOOLEAN)

    set_doc = 'Determines if hex-dump always starts at an "aligned" address (see hex-dump-width'
    show_doc = 'Hex dump alignment is currently'

class HexDumpWidth(gdb.Parameter):
    def __init__(self):
        super (HexDumpWidth, self).__init__('hex-dump-width',
                                            gdb.COMMAND_DATA,
                                            gdb.PARAM_INTEGER)

    set_doc = 'Set the number of bytes per line of hex-dump'

    show_doc = 'The number of bytes per line in hex-dump is'

HexDump()
HexDumpAlign()
HexDumpWidth()

I realize it might not be the most beautiful and elegant solution, but it gets the job done and works as a first draft. It could be included in ~/.gdbinit like:

python
sys.path.insert(0, '/path/to/module/dir')
import hexdump
end

Then could be used with the program above like so:

(gdb) hex-dump buf 100
0x7fffffffdf00:  01 02 03 04 53 74 72 69 6E 67 20 44 61 74 61 AA  ....String Data.
0x7fffffffdf10:  BB CC 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf20:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf30:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf40:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf50:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf60:  00 00 00 00                                      ....

And a few other touches for good measure:

(gdb) set hex-dump-align on
Determines if hex-dump always starts at an "aligned" address (see hex-dump-width
(gdb) hex-dump &buf[5] 95
0x7fffffffdf00:                 74 72 69 6E 67 20 44 61 74 61 AA       tring Data.
0x7fffffffdf10:  BB CC 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf20:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf30:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf40:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf50:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................
0x7fffffffdf60:  00 00 00 00                                      ....

(gdb) set hex-dump-width 8
Set the number of bytes per line of hex-dump
(gdb) hex-dump &buf[5] 95
0x7fffffffdf00:                 74 72 69       tri
0x7fffffffdf08:  6E 67 20 44 61 74 61 AA  ng Data.
0x7fffffffdf10:  BB CC 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf18:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf20:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf28:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf30:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf38:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf40:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf48:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf50:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf58:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........
0x7fffffffdf60:  00 00 00 00              ....

No promises that there aren't bugs :). I might stick it up in github or something if people are interested.

I've only tested it with GDB 7.4.

  • 1
    +1 since this solution preserves the original address, very handy ! – Shmil The Cat Mar 31 '14 at 15:09
  • I'm getting an ImportError: no module named hexdump error – haneefmubarak Mar 18 '15 at 3:57
  • Make sure you have saved the script as hexdump.py and that the path in your .gdbinit is correct – FatalError Mar 18 '15 at 9:11
  • Nice, few things work "out of the box" like that on a first draft! I'm putting mine in /usr/local/lib/gdb/hexdump.py – Daniel Santos Apr 3 '15 at 9:33
  • 1
    This is awesome. However, I had to update the line: pr_addr = int(str(addr), 16) to pr_addr = int(str(addr).split()[0], 16) – Kieran Jan 7 '16 at 17:45
2

an adapted version of the solution of User FatalError

  • works with python 3
  • added a hex-col-header
  • length parameter optional
  • renamed to hd

examples

hd 0xbfffe4f1

hd 0xbfffe4f1 500

import gdb
from curses.ascii import isgraph

def groups_of(iterable, size, first=0):
    first = first if first != 0 else size
    chunk, iterable = iterable[:first], iterable[first:]
    while chunk:
        yield chunk
        chunk, iterable = iterable[:size], iterable[size:]

class HexDump(gdb.Command):
    def __init__(self):
        super (HexDump, self).__init__ ('hd', gdb.COMMAND_DATA)

    def invoke(self, arg, from_tty):
        argv = gdb.string_to_argv(arg)

        addr = gdb.parse_and_eval(argv[0]).cast(
            gdb.lookup_type('void').pointer())
        if len(argv) == 2:
             try:
                 bytes = int(gdb.parse_and_eval(argv[1]))
             except ValueError:
                 raise gdb.GdbError('Byte count numst be an integer value.')
        else:
             bytes = 500

        inferior = gdb.selected_inferior()

        align = gdb.parameter('hex-dump-align')
        width = gdb.parameter('hex-dump-width')
        if width == 0:
            width = 16

        mem = inferior.read_memory(addr, bytes)
        pr_addr = int(str(addr), 16)
        pr_offset = width

        if align:
            pr_offset = width - (pr_addr % width)
            pr_addr -= pr_addr % width
        start=(pr_addr) & 0xff;


        print ('            ' , end="")
        print ('  '.join(['%01X' % (i&0x0f,) for i in range(start,start+width)]) , end="")
        print ('  ' , end="")       
        print (' '.join(['%01X' % (i&0x0f,) for i in range(start,start+width)]) )

        for group in groups_of(mem, width, pr_offset):
            print ('0x%x: ' % (pr_addr,) + '   '*(width - pr_offset), end="")
            print (' '.join(['%02X' % (ord(g),) for g in group]) + \
                '   ' * (width - len(group) if pr_offset == width else 0) + ' ', end="")    
            print (' '*(width - pr_offset) +  ' '.join(
                [chr( int.from_bytes(g, byteorder='big')) if isgraph( int.from_bytes(g, byteorder='big')   ) or g == ' ' else '.' for g in group]))
            pr_addr += width
            pr_offset = width

class HexDumpAlign(gdb.Parameter):
    def __init__(self):
        super (HexDumpAlign, self).__init__('hex-dump-align',
                                            gdb.COMMAND_DATA,
                                            gdb.PARAM_BOOLEAN)

    set_doc = 'Determines if hex-dump always starts at an "aligned" address (see hex-dump-width'
    show_doc = 'Hex dump alignment is currently'

class HexDumpWidth(gdb.Parameter):
    def __init__(self):
        super (HexDumpWidth, self).__init__('hex-dump-width',
                                            gdb.COMMAND_DATA,
                                            gdb.PARAM_INTEGER)

    set_doc = 'Set the number of bytes per line of hex-dump'

    show_doc = 'The number of bytes per line in hex-dump is'

HexDump()
HexDumpAlign()
HexDumpWidth()
1

Unfortunately, @FatalError's and @gunthor's versions didn't work for me, so I wrote yet another one myself. This is how it looks like:

(gdb) xxd hello_string 0xc
00000001_00000f87:                  48 656c 6c6f 0957 6f72         Hello.Wor
00000001_00000f90: 6c64 0a                                  ld.

Newer versions of xxd supports the -o flag that allows specifying an offset to add to the displayed one (which will always start at 0000000).

In case xxd -o isn't available, here is a substitute that correctly aligns and shows address of the location that is xxd'd.

The xxd command:

define xxd
    dump binary memory /tmp/dump.bin $arg0 $arg0+$arg1
    eval "shell xxd-o %p /tmp/dump.bin", $arg0
end

The arguably ugly perl script xxd-o (xxd with offset):

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use IPC::Open2; 
$SIG{'__WARN__'} = sub{ die "$0: $!\n" };

my $offset = shift // "0";
$offset = oct($offset) if $offset =~ /^0/;
my $base = $offset >= 2**32 ? 16 : 8;

my $zeroes = $offset % 16;
my $padding = 1 + int($zeroes / 2) + 2*$zeroes;
my $bytestr = "\0" x $zeroes;
{ local $/; $bytestr .= <> }

open2(\*XXD_OUT, \*XXD_IN, "xxd") or die "xxd is not available!";
print XXD_IN $bytestr; close XXD_IN;

if ($zeroes) {
    $_ = <XXD_OUT>;
    s/^(.{50}).{$zeroes}/$1 . (' ' x $zeroes)/ge;
    s/^([[:xdigit:]]+:).{$padding}/$1 . (' ' x $padding)/ge;
    my $newoff = sprintf("%0${base}x",hex($1)+$offset) =~ s/^(.{8})(.{8})$/$1_$2/r;
    s/^([[:xdigit:]]+):/$newoff:/g;
    print
}
while (<XXD_OUT>) {
    s/^([[:xdigit:]]+)(?=:)/sprintf("%0${base}x", hex($1)+$offset-$offset%16) =~ s[^(.{8})(.{8})$][$1_$2]r/ge;
    print
}

Improvements welcome! :-)

0

My own contribution, from Employed Russian solution and Roger Lipscombe comments:

  • use xxd,
  • preserve the address (xxd -o)
  • size argument is optional
  • small documentation included

The script (tested with gdb 7.8.1):

define xxd
  if $argc < 2
    set $size = sizeof(*$arg0)
  else
    set $size = $arg1
  end
  dump binary memory dump.bin $arg0 ((void *)$arg0)+$size
  eval "shell xxd -o %d dump.bin; rm dump.bin", ((void *)$arg0)
end
document xxd
  Dump memory with xxd command (keep the address as offset)

  xxd addr [size]
    addr -- expression resolvable as an address
    size -- size (in byte) of memory to dump
            sizeof(*addr) is used by default
end

Examples:

(gdb) p &m_data
$1 = (data_t *) 0x200130dc <m_data>

(gdb) p sizeof(m_data)
$2 = 32

(gdb) xxd &m_data 32
200130dc: 0300 0000 e87c 0400 0000 0000 0100 0000  .....|..........
200130ec: 0c01 0000 b831 0020 0100 0000 0100 0000  .....1. ........

(gdb) xxd &m_data
200130dc: 0300 0000 e87c 0400 0000 0000 0100 0000  .....|..........
200130ec: 0c01 0000 b831 0020 0100 0000 0100 0000  .....1. ........

(gdb) help xxd
  Dump memory with xxd command (keep the address as offset)

  xxd addr [size]
    addr -- expression resolvable as an address
    size -- size (in byte) of memory to dump
            sizeof(*addr) is used by default

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