43

I am in mobile app and I use multiple Ajax calls to receive data from web server like below

function get_json() {
    $(document).ready(function() {
        $.ajax({
            url: 'http://www.xxxxxxxxxxxxx',
            data: {
                name: 'xxxxxx'
            },
            dataType: 'jsonp',
            //jsonp: 'callback',
            //jsonpCallback: 'jsonpCallback',
            success: function(data) {
                $.each(data.posts, function(i, post) {
                    $.mobile.notesdb.transaction(function(t) {
                        t.executeSql('INSERT into bill (barcode, buildingcode, buildingaddress, flatname, flatdescription, entryseason, period, amount, pastpayments, todaypayments, paydate, receiptno) VALUES (?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?);', [post.Id, post.Code, post.Address, post.Name, post.Description, post.EntrySeason, post.Period, post.Revenue, post.PastPayments, post.todaypayments, post.paydate, post.receiptno],
                        //$.mobile.changePage('#page3', 'slide', false, true),  
                        null);
                    });
                    $('#mycontent').append(post.Name);
                });
            }
        });

        $.ajax({
            xxxx
        });

        $.ajax({
            xxxx
        });
    });
}

How can I force the 2nd ajax call to begin after the end of the first... the 3rd after the end of the 2nd and so go on?

  • The only thing about this is a failed AJAX call will result in no other AJAX calls being made (because there is no "do this if the AJAX call fails", it'll just wait for a "success" forever). Maybe that's exactly what you want ... just something to consider. – Timothy Aaron Feb 10 '12 at 22:04
  • I think you'd be better off using $.when as @Lyon suggests. – garageàtrois May 6 '14 at 16:29
51

Place them inside of the success: of the one it relies on.

$.ajax({
    url: 'http://www.xxxxxxxxxxxxx',
    data: {name: 'xxxxxx'},
    dataType: 'jsonp',
    success: function(data){

        // do stuff

        // call next ajax function
        $.ajax({ xxx });
    }
});
  • how can i do this can you explain it – kosbou Feb 10 '12 at 21:47
  • Repeat for multiple levels of $.ajax() calls. – Timothy Aaron Feb 10 '12 at 21:51
  • You can recursively do this for an unknown number of AJAX requests. There are currently a couple of answers to the question that demonstrate this. – Jasper Feb 10 '12 at 21:53
  • Recursive is definitely the way to go ... assuming he's doing the exact same call every time. I just wasn't assuming that. – Timothy Aaron Feb 10 '12 at 21:58
  • @timothy - if i m writing as a common method. how can i call this situation? – albert Jegani Apr 21 '15 at 6:22
52

You are somewhat close, but you should put your function inside the document.ready event handler instead of the other-way-around.

Another way to do this is by placing your AJAX call in a generic function and call that function from an AJAX callback to loop through a set of requests in order:

$(function () {

    //setup an array of AJAX options,
    //each object will specify information for a single AJAX request
    var ajaxes  = [
            {
                url      : '<url>',
                data     : {...},
                callback : function (data) { /*do work on data*/ }
            },
            {
                url      : '<url2>',
                data     : {...},
                callback : function (data) { /*maybe something different (maybe not)*/ }
            }
        ],
        current = 0;

    //declare your function to run AJAX requests
    function do_ajax() {

        //check to make sure there are more requests to make
        if (current < ajaxes.length) {

            //make the AJAX request with the given info from the array of objects
            $.ajax({
                url      : ajaxes[current].url,
                data     : ajaxes[current].data,
                success  : function (serverResponse) {

                    //once a successful response has been received,
                    //no HTTP error or timeout reached,
                    //run the callback for this request
                    ajaxes[current].callback(serverResponse);

                },
                complete : function () {

                    //increment the `current` counter
                    //and recursively call our do_ajax() function again.
                    current++;
                    do_ajax();

                    //note that the "success" callback will fire
                    //before the "complete" callback

                }
            });
        }
    }

    //run the AJAX function for the first time once `document.ready` fires
    do_ajax();

});

In this example, the recursive call to run the next AJAX request is being set as the complete callback so that it runs regardless of the status of the current response. Meaning that if the request times out or returns an HTTP error (or invalid response), the next request will still run. If you require subsequent requests to only run when a request is successful, then using the success callback to make your recursive call would likely be best.

Updated 2018-08-21 in regards to good points in comments.

  • 1
    Holy Ajaxception, Batman! this is certainly an over-complication on what the OP needs. @Lyon's answer is much nicer. – igorsantos07 Nov 12 '15 at 4:11
  • 1
    Also, if you wanna ignore errors, you can do a complete: function(){ current++; do_ajax();} in there. :) – PossessWithin Mar 20 '18 at 1:59
  • Why is this getting so many votes? This is an example of "recursive" AJAX callbacks. The OP was asking about "successive" callbacks... explicitly not calling the same function. – Timothy Aaron Aug 20 '18 at 21:31
10

Wrap each ajax call in a named function and just add them to the success callbacks of the previous call:

function callA() {
    $.ajax({
    ...
    success: function() {
      //do stuff
      callB();
    }
    });
}

function callB() {
    $.ajax({
    ...
    success: function() {
        //do stuff
        callC();
    }
    });
}

function callC() {
    $.ajax({
    ...
    });
}


callA();
  • 1
    this makes the function name misleading: callA is not only callA, but also callB & C – marstone Jul 14 '17 at 6:18
  • callA could be callABC and callB -> calBC, but that is only meaningful upon success. Still, seems a simple solution for small code and more straight forward then the accepted answer. – Jim Sep 18 at 16:58
10

This is the most elegant solution I've been using for a while. It doesn't require external counter variable and it provides nice degree of encapsulation.

var urls = ['http://..', 'http://..', ..];

function ajaxRequest (urls) {
    if (urls.length > 0) {
        $.ajax({
            method: 'GET',
            url: urls.pop()
        })
        .done(function (result)) {
            ajaxRequest(urls);
        });
    }
}

ajaxRequest(urls); 
  • 1
    This is elegant if every call is the same except for the URL. If the Ajax calls involve different methods, return handling, and/or different data to send, it's going to get pretty inelegant. Skyler's solution above will be much clearer in that case. – Bob Ray Jul 13 '18 at 4:34
  • 2
    Well this meant to be basic example but you can define methods, return handling and parameters for each request in similar way .. be creative .. However for beginners defining new function for each request might be more straight forward approach .. – zoxxx Jul 25 '18 at 13:00
8

You could also use jquery when and then functions. for example

 $.when( $.ajax( "test.aspx" ) ).then(function( data, textStatus, jqXHR ) {
  //another ajax call
});

https://api.jquery.com/jQuery.when/

  • 3
    how to write for 4 levels of hierarchy ? – coding_idiot Aug 2 '14 at 7:14
  • how about performance speed ? – Freddy Sidauruk Nov 28 '16 at 4:37
2

I consider the following to be more pragmatic since it does not sequence the ajax calls but that is surely a matter of taste.

function check_ajax_call_count()
{
    if ( window.ajax_call_count==window.ajax_calls_completed )
    {
        // do whatever needs to be done after the last ajax call finished
    }
}
window.ajax_call_count = 0;
window.ajax_calls_completed = 10;
setInterval(check_ajax_call_count,100);

Now you can iterate window.ajax_call_count inside the success part of your ajax requests until it reaches the specified number of calls send (window.ajax_calls_completed).

0
$(document).ready(function(){
 $('#category').change(function(){  
  $("#app").fadeOut();
$.ajax({
type: "POST",
url: "themes/ajax.php",
data: "cat="+$(this).val(),
cache: false,
success: function(msg)
    {
    $('#app').fadeIn().html(msg);
    $('#app').change(function(){    
    $("#store").fadeOut();
        $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "themes/ajax.php",
        data: "app="+$(this).val(),
        cache: false,
        success: function(ms)
            {
            $('#store').fadeIn().html(ms);

            }
            });// second ajAx
        });// second on change


     }// first  ajAx sucess
  });// firs ajAx
 });// firs on change

});
0

Haven't tried it yet but this is the best way I can think of if there umpteen number of ajax calls.

Method1:

let ajax1= $.ajax({url:'', type:'', . . .});
let ajax2= $.ajax({url:'', type:'', . . .});
.
.
.
let ajaxList = [ajax1, ajax2, . . .]

let count = 0;
let executeAjax = (i) => {
   $.when(ajaxList[i]).done((data) => {
      //  dataOperations goes here
      return i++
   })
}
while (count< ajaxList.length) {
   count = executeAjax(count)
}

If there are only a handful you can always nest them like this.

Method2:

$.when(ajax1).done((data1) => {
      //  dataOperations goes here on data1
      $.when(ajax2).done((data2) => {
         //  Here you can utilize data1 and data 2 simultaneously 
         . . . and so on
      })
   })

Note: If it is repetitive task go for method1, And if each data is to be treated differently, nesting in method2 makes more sense.

-3

We can simply use

async: false 

This will do your need.

  • No, this is the worst thing you can do because it will hang your browser till ajax request not complete. – Davinder Kumar Nov 9 '17 at 10:51
  • As of jQuery 1.8, the use of async: false with jqXHR ($.Deferred) is deprecated. – Andy May 14 '18 at 10:51

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