321

I have two simple one-dimensional arrays in NumPy. I should be able to concatenate them using numpy.concatenate. But I get this error for the code below:

TypeError: only length-1 arrays can be converted to Python scalars

Code

import numpy
a = numpy.array([1, 2, 3])
b = numpy.array([5, 6])
numpy.concatenate(a, b)

Why?

1
  • 1
    If you want to concatenate them (into a single array) along an axis, use np.concatenat(..., axis). If you want to stack them vertically, use np.vstack. If you want to stack them (into multiple arrays) horizontally, use np.hstack. (If you want to stack them depth-wise, i.e. teh 3rd dimension, use np.dstack). Note that the latter are similar to pandas pd.concat – smci Apr 29 '20 at 2:52
437

The line should be:

numpy.concatenate([a,b])

The arrays you want to concatenate need to be passed in as a sequence, not as separate arguments.

From the NumPy documentation:

numpy.concatenate((a1, a2, ...), axis=0)

Join a sequence of arrays together.

It was trying to interpret your b as the axis parameter, which is why it complained it couldn't convert it into a scalar.

6
  • 2
    thanks! just curious - what is the logic behind this? – user391339 Jul 12 '16 at 6:08
  • 9
    @user391339, what if you wanted to concatenate three arrays? The function is more useful in taking a sequence then if it just took two arrays. – Winston Ewert Jul 12 '16 at 17:13
  • @WinstonEwert Assuming the issue isn't that it's hardcoded to two arguments, you could use it like numpy.concatenate(a1, a2, a3) or numpy.concatenate(*[a1, a2, a3]) if you prefer. Python's fluid enough that the difference ends up feeling more cosmetic than substantial, but it's good when the API is consistent (e.g. if all the numpy functions that take variable length argument lists require explicit sequences). – Jim K. Aug 24 '16 at 20:43
  • @JimK. What would happen to the axis parameter? – Winston Ewert Aug 24 '16 at 21:12
  • 1
    Assuming the things to concatenate are all positional parameters, you could keep axis as a keyword argument e.g. def concatx(*sequences, **kwargs)). It's not ideal since you can't seem to name the keyword args explicitly in the signature this way, but there are workarounds. – Jim K. Aug 24 '16 at 23:07
51

There are several possibilities for concatenating 1D arrays, e.g.,

numpy.r_[a, a],
numpy.stack([a, a]).reshape(-1),
numpy.hstack([a, a]),
numpy.concatenate([a, a])

All those options are equally fast for large arrays; for small ones, concatenate has a slight edge:

enter image description here

The plot was created with perfplot:

import numpy
import perfplot

perfplot.show(
    setup=lambda n: numpy.random.rand(n),
    kernels=[
        lambda a: numpy.r_[a, a],
        lambda a: numpy.stack([a, a]).reshape(-1),
        lambda a: numpy.hstack([a, a]),
        lambda a: numpy.concatenate([a, a]),
    ],
    labels=["r_", "stack+reshape", "hstack", "concatenate"],
    n_range=[2 ** k for k in range(19)],
    xlabel="len(a)",
)
2
  • 14
    The alternatives all use np.concatenate. They just massage the input list in various ways before hand. np.stack for example adds an extra dimension to all input arrays. Look at their source code. Only concatenate is compiled. – hpaulj May 26 '17 at 16:45
  • 1
    Just to add to @hpaulj 's comment - the times all converge as the size of the arrays grows because the np.concatenate makes copies of the inputs. This memory and time cost then outweighs the time spent 'massaging' the input. – n1k31t4 Mar 9 '18 at 18:29
35

The first parameter to concatenate should itself be a sequence of arrays to concatenate:

numpy.concatenate((a,b)) # Note the extra parentheses.
14

An alternative ist to use the short form of "concatenate" which is either "r_[...]" or "c_[...]" as shown in the example code beneath (see http://wiki.scipy.org/NumPy_for_Matlab_Users for additional information):

%pylab
vector_a = r_[0.:10.] #short form of "arange"
vector_b = array([1,1,1,1])
vector_c = r_[vector_a,vector_b]
print vector_a
print vector_b
print vector_c, '\n\n'

a = ones((3,4))*4
print a, '\n'
c = array([1,1,1])
b = c_[a,c]
print b, '\n\n'

a = ones((4,3))*4
print a, '\n'
c = array([[1,1,1]])
b = r_[a,c]
print b

print type(vector_b)

Which results in:

[ 0.  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  9.]
[1 1 1 1]
[ 0.  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  9.  1.  1.  1.  1.] 


[[ 4.  4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.  4.]] 

[[ 4.  4.  4.  4.  1.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.  4.  1.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.  4.  1.]] 


[[ 4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.]] 

[[ 4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.]]
2
  • 2
    vector_b = [1,1,1,1] #short form of "array", this is simply not true. vector_b will be a standard Python list type. Numpy is however quite good at accepting sequences instead of forcing all inputs to be numpy.array types. – Hannes Ovrén Dec 23 '13 at 12:07
  • 2
    You are right - I was wrong. I corrected my source code as well as the result. – Semjon Mössinger Dec 24 '13 at 6:48
1

Here are more approaches for doing this by using numpy.ravel(), numpy.array(), utilizing the fact that 1D arrays can be unpacked into plain elements:

# we'll utilize the concept of unpacking
In [15]: (*a, *b)
Out[15]: (1, 2, 3, 5, 6)

# using `numpy.ravel()`
In [14]: np.ravel((*a, *b))
Out[14]: array([1, 2, 3, 5, 6])

# wrap the unpacked elements in `numpy.array()`
In [16]: np.array((*a, *b))
Out[16]: array([1, 2, 3, 5, 6])
1

Some more facts from the numpy docs :

With syntax as numpy.concatenate((a1, a2, ...), axis=0, out=None)

axis = 0 for row-wise concatenation axis = 1 for column-wise concatenation

>>> a = np.array([[1, 2], [3, 4]])
>>> b = np.array([[5, 6]])

# Appending below last row
>>> np.concatenate((a, b), axis=0)
array([[1, 2],
       [3, 4],
       [5, 6]])

# Appending after last column
>>> np.concatenate((a, b.T), axis=1)    # Notice the transpose
array([[1, 2, 5],
       [3, 4, 6]])

# Flattening the final array
>>> np.concatenate((a, b), axis=None)
array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6])

I hope it helps !

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