6

I'm using PDO and trying to make my application support both MySQL and SQLite, but in sqlite I get this error when I try to import my database schema:

SQLSTATE[HY000]: General error: 1 near "AUTO_INCREMENT": syntax error

The query looks like this:

CREATE TABLE events (

  id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  name VARCHAR(32) NOT NULL,
  title VARCHAR(64) NOT NULL,
  description LONGTEXT,
  starttime DATETIME DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',

  PRIMARY KEY(id),
  KEY name(name)

) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;

(and it works in a MySQL database.)

I don't understand what the problem is here? Shouldn't both database systems be compatible?

  • SQLite AUTOINCREMENT documentation - autoincrement is not ANSI, sequences were only recently made ANSI for handling sequential value generation. – OMG Ponies Feb 11 '12 at 21:07
  • what made you think they were the same? Each RDBMS seems to have it's own little twist, so you are going to run into these kind of issues. Here is sqlite documentation on AUTOINCREMENT: sqlite.org/autoinc.html – J Cooper Feb 11 '12 at 21:08
8

http://www.sqlite.org/autoinc.html

In SQLite it's called AUTOINCREMENT, not AUTO_INCREMENT

5

AUTO_INCREMENT is MySQL-specific. SQLite apparently has a similar thing, AUTOINCREMENT.

  • ok I changed that but now I get the same error ...near "AUTOINCREMENT": – Alex Feb 11 '12 at 21:10
  • 2
    You may have to say like id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT. I've never bothered with SQLite; i just knowhow to google. :) – cHao Feb 11 '12 at 21:12
  • I managed to fix all errors tx :) – Alex Feb 11 '12 at 21:44
4

They should be compatible as regards the ANSI SQL standards, and all SQL databases should adhere to that. However, AutoIncrement is not a part of that standard, but an extra feature implemented by some databases (including MySQL). Not all databases provide that feature, or may provide it in a different manner, or with different syntax.

3

Unfortunately though SQL should be a standard, each database implementation is different and have its own peculiarities, so you have to arrange your Query to make it work on SQLite.

2

No, they support a completely different set of features. The most significant difference is that SQLite uses dynamic data types whereas MySQL uses static data types, but there are many other differences too.

They do however both support a common subset of SQL, so it is possible to write some simple SQL statements that will work in both systems.

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