This question already has an answer here:

The code below (also available as a demo on JS Fiddle) does not position the text in the middle, as I ideally would like it to. I cannot find any way to vertically centre text in a div, even using the margin-top attribute. How can I do this?

<div id="column-content">
    <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/12qzO.png">
    <strong>1234</strong>
    yet another text content that should be centered vertically
</div>
#column-content {
    display: inline-block;
    border: 1px solid red;
    position:relative;
}

#column-content strong {
    color: #592102;
    font-size: 18px;
}

img {
    margin-top:-7px;
    vertical-align: middle;        
}

marked as duplicate by Kling Klang, Kromster, Henrik, user2706988, kero May 17 '14 at 13:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

10 Answers 10

up vote 397 down vote accepted

Create a container for your text content, a span perhaps.

#column-content {
  display: inline-block;
}
img {
  vertical-align: middle;
}
span {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

/* for visual purposes */
#column-content {
  border: 1px solid red;
  position: relative;
}
<div id="column-content">

  <img src="http://i.imgur.com/WxW4B.png">
  <span><strong>1234</strong>
    yet another text content that should be centered vertically</span>
</div>

JSFiddle

  • 47
    Can you explain why, when a height property is specified for either the span or the span's parent element, the vertical-align property does not work? Using your demo specifically, I added a height property to the parent element to see if the span would still vertically align itself, but it doesn't. – Josh Apr 9 '12 at 15:31
  • 121
    @Josh that is due to line-height. If you add height to an element where exactly does the text inside of it lie? That is, if you have a block of text that is font-size: 10px (a theoretical height:10px) inside a container that is 60px where exactly is the text going to end up? Most surely at the top of the container, because the text can only position itself where the text flows, inside a height:10px space. But you can overcome that by using a line-height value the same height as the container, this way the text will take in the vertical-align property and align itself properly. – Andres Ilich Apr 9 '12 at 15:56
  • 9
    @Josh demo: jsfiddle.net/9Y7Cm/37 .. added a height of 100px to the container and also a line-height of 100px to the span tag. – Andres Ilich Apr 9 '12 at 15:57
  • 2
    Absolutely beautiful. Thanks, mate. I completely overlooked line-height. – Josh Apr 9 '12 at 16:07
  • 13
    not working in chrome – Adeem May 8 '14 at 5:01

Andres Ilich has it right. Just in case someone misses his comment...

A.) If you only have one line of text:

div
{
  height: 200px;
  line-height: 200px; /* <-- this is what you must define */
}
<div>vertically centered text</div>

B.) If you have multiple lines of text:

div
{
  height: 200px;
  line-height: 200px;
}

span
{
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  line-height: 18px; /* <-- adjust this */
}
<div><span>vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text vertically centered text</span></div>

  • 1
    The multiple line solution does not work if you use XHTML transitional as DOCTYPE. – Jenny O'Reilly Jun 3 '13 at 8:56
  • 4
    The multiple line solution is flawed. You have to set the line height solution does not work like this! (haven't found a solution so far - if I do, I'll provide it here. – ProblemsOfSumit Jul 19 '13 at 12:28
  • 9
    should be the accepted answer +1 – ezmilhouse Feb 26 '14 at 12:26
  • 3
    Works nice apart from not honouring word-wrap: break-word, which is broken in this case. – ellimilial Jun 29 '14 at 18:41
  • 2
    If you don't want to set line-height anyways - you can simply use line-height: initial; or........................ line-height: normal; :) – jave.web Nov 17 '15 at 14:57

Update April 10, 2016

Flexboxes should now be used to vertically (or even horizontally) align items.

<div class="flex-container">
    <div class="flex-item">Item</div>
    <div class="flex-item">Item</div>
    <div class="flex-item">Item</div>
    <div class="flex-item">Item</div>
</div>

<style>
.flex-container {
    display:flex;
    align-items: center; /* Vertical center alignment */
    justify-content: center; /* Horizontal center alignment */
}
</style>

A good guide to flexbox can be read on CSS Tricks. Thanks Ben (from comments) for pointing out, didn't have time to update.


A good guy named Mahendra posted a very working solution here

The following class should make the element horizontally and vertically centered to its parent.

.absolute-center {

/* Internet Explorer 10 */
display:-ms-flexbox;
-ms-flex-pack:center;
-ms-flex-align:center;

/* Firefox */
display:-moz-box;
-moz-box-pack:center;
-moz-box-align:center;

/* Safari, Opera, and Chrome */
display:-webkit-box;
-webkit-box-pack:center;
-webkit-box-align:center;

/* W3C */
display:box;
box-pack:center;
box-align:center;

}
  • 9
    If you ended up on this page, this is the solution you're looking for. Many thanks Omar. – Preston Sep 29 '14 at 17:08
  • 10
    Not anymore, the spec has changed and most of the above is now deprecated. [stackoverflow.com/questions/16280040/… The logic of using flexbox however is sound, something like: display:flex; justify-content:center; align-items:center; – Ben Jul 14 '15 at 16:23
  • If the div in included in other divs using display:inline-flex; helps a lot! – klodoma May 26 '16 at 9:31
  • This will vertically align items in your flex-container, however, you lose the power of floats inside the container. – Kurt Van den Branden Dec 27 '16 at 11:47

This is an old question, but the accepted answer doesn't work for multi-line text. I updated the JSfiddle to show css multiline text vertical align as explained here:

<div id="column-content">
    <div>yet another text content that should be centered vertically</div>
</div>

#column-content {
    border: 1px solid red;
    height: 200px;
    width: 100px;
}
div {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align:middle;
    text-align: center;
}

It also works with <br /> in "yet another..."

  • 1
    i think the table cell should be on the wrapper, and secondly if wrapper has position absolute it stops working – luky Oct 8 '16 at 17:07

Try this:

HTML

<div><span>Text</span></div>

CSS

div {
    height: 100px;
}

span {
    height: 100px;
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
  • 1
    This one worked fine for me - Firefox 24 – alfadog67 May 6 '14 at 17:08
  • 2
    You can also change the height: 100px to height:inherit so you don't have to change 2 values every time. – Stefanos Chrs Oct 20 '14 at 17:57

This is simply supposed to work:

#column-content {
        --------
        margin-top:auto;
        margin-bottom:auto;
    }

Tried it on your demo.

  • 1
    This is an excellent, simple solution! – w.brian Aug 20 '14 at 14:40
  • 3
    This should be the same as margin:auto 0 where the first value ('auto') is for top and bottom margin and the second value (the 0) is for the left and right margin. – Joshua Apr 1 '16 at 4:24
  • You are right! but in this way it's more clear for beginners, and your comment makes it wiser. thanks! – ParPar Apr 3 '16 at 6:28
  • 1
    This works only with a parent element using either display:flex or display:grid or display:inline-table or display:inline-grid. Doesn't work in older browsers – Frondor Sep 10 '17 at 11:53
  • I never heard of this one, but it did work in my case. – fallingCode Sep 5 at 6:11

To make Omar's (or Mahendra's) solution even more universal, the block of code relative to FireFox should be replaced by the following:

/* Firefox */
display:flex;
justify-content:center;
align-items:center;

The problem with Omar's code, otherwise operative, arises when you want to center the box in the screen or in it's immediate ancestor. This centering is done either by setting its position to

position: relative; or position:static; (not with position:absolute nor fixed).

and then margin: auto; or margin-right:auto; margin-left:auto;

Under this box center aligning environment, Omar's suggestion does not work. Doesn't work either in IE8 (yet 7.7% market share). So for IE8 (and other browsers), a workaround as seen in other above solutions should be considered.

This is the simplest way to do it if you need multiple lines. Wrap you span'd text in another span and specify its height with line-height. The trick to multiple lines is resetting the inner span's line-height.

<span class="textvalignmiddle"><span>YOUR TEXT HERE</span></span>
.textvalignmiddle {
    line-height: /*set height*/;
}

.textvalignmiddle > span {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    line-height: 1em; /*set line height back to normal*/
}

DEMO

Of course the outer span could be a div or whathaveyou

  • Nice. The line-height was the key. – 5hahiL Nov 1 '13 at 8:15
  • THIS IS AMAZING! All the other answers here suck. This one here is EXACTLY what I needed. You rock. What a cute little 'hack' this is. Thanks! – Andy Aug 10 at 13:01

Add a vertical align to the css #column-content strong too:

#column-content strong {
    ...
    vertical-align: middle;
}

Also see your updated example.

=== UPDATE ===

With a span around the other text and another vertical align:

html:

... <span>yet another text content that should be centered vertically</span> ...

css:

#column-content span {
    vertical-align: middle;
}

Also see the next example.

I know it’s totally stupid and you normally really shouldn’t use tables when not creating tables but: Table cells can align multiple lines of text vertically centered and even do this by default. So a solution which works quite fine could be something like this:

html:

<div class="box">
  <table class="textalignmiddle">
    <tr>
      <td>lorem ipsum ...</td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</div>

css: (make the table item always fit to the box div)

.box {
  /* for example */
  height: 300px;
}

.textalignmiddle {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
}

see here: http://www.cssdesk.com/LzpeV

  • 7
    Don't ever use tables for layout. Don't. Ever. This is simply a fail. – bitbitdecker Nov 5 '13 at 12:46
  • The other answers suggesting table-like CSS properties are more suited to our modern web. – Steve Davis May 14 '14 at 16:43
  • @bitbitdecker no always use tables since CSS doesn't work. – sproketboy Oct 30 '14 at 19:22
  • 1
    Not true. Use table related style attributes. Using real table markup for this just proves your ignorance. – bitbitdecker Nov 21 '14 at 13:22

protected by zoul Jan 20 '14 at 9:46

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