Is there a perceptible difference between using String.Format and string concatenation in Java?

I tend to use String.format but occasionally will slip and use a concat. I was wondering if one was better than the other.

The way I see it, String.Format gives you more power in "formatting" the string; and concatenation means you don't have to worry about accidentally putting in an extra %s or missing one out.

String.format is also shorter.

Which one is more readable depends on how your head works.

12 Answers 12

up vote 199 down vote accepted

I'd suggest that it is better practice to use String.format(). The main reason is that String.format() can be more easily localised with text loaded from resource files whereas concatenation can't be localised without producing a new executable with different code for each language.

If you plan on your app being localisable you should also get into the habit of specifying argument positions for your format tokens as well:

"Hello %1$s the time is %2$t"

This can then be localised and have the name and time tokens swapped without requiring a recompile of the executable to account for the different ordering. With argument positions you can also re-use the same argument without passing it into the function twice:

String.format("Hello %1$s, your name is %1$s and the time is %2$t", name, time)
  • 1
    Can you point me to some documentation that talks about how to work with argument positions/order in Java (i.e., how to reference arguments by their position)? Thanks. – markvgti Aug 20 '11 at 7:28
  • 11
    Better late than never, random Java version: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/… – Aksel Jan 17 '12 at 19:53

About performance:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {      
  long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
  for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++){
    String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i*2;
  }
  long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
  System.out.println("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond") ;

  start = System.currentTimeMillis();
  for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++){
    String s = String.format("Hi %s; Hi to you %s",i, + i*2);
  }
  end = System.currentTimeMillis();
  System.out.println("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");
}

The timing results are as follows:

  • Concatenation = 265 millisecond
  • Format = 4141 millisecond

Therefore, concatenation is much faster than String.format.

  • 11
    They are all bad practice. Use StringBuilder. – Amir Raminfar Aug 11 '11 at 16:37
  • 5
    StringBuilder is out of scope here (the OP question was about comparing String.format over string Concatenation) but have you performace data about String Builder? – Icaro Jan 2 '12 at 10:46
  • 76
    @AmirRaminar: The compiler converts "+" to calls to StringBuilder automatically. – Martin Schröder Feb 23 '12 at 14:50
  • 28
    @MartinSchröder: If you run javap -c StringTest.class you'll see that the compiler converts "+" to StringBuilder automatically only if you are not in a loop. If the concatenation is all done on a single line it's the same as using '+', but if you use myString += "morechars"; or myString += anotherString; on multiple lines you'll notice that more than one StringBuilder might be created, so using "+" is not always as efficient as StringBuilder. – ccpizza Nov 21 '14 at 9:57
  • 3
    @Joffrey: what I meant was that for loops + does not get converted to StringBuilder.append() but instead a new StringBuilder() happens on each iteration. – ccpizza Mar 20 '17 at 10:49

Since there is discussion about performance I figured I'd add in a comparison that included StringBuilder. It is in fact faster than the concat and, naturally the String.format option.

To make this a sort of apples to apples comparison I instantiate a new StringBuilder in the loop rather than outside (this is actually faster than doing just one instantiation most likely due to the overhead of re-allocating space for the looping append at the end of one builder).

    String formatString = "Hi %s; Hi to you %s";

    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = String.format(formatString, i, +i * 2);
    }

    long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
    log.info("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i * 2;
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    log.info("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        StringBuilder bldString = new StringBuilder("Hi ");
        bldString.append(i).append("; Hi to you ").append(i * 2);
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    log.info("String Builder = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");
  • 2012-01-11 16:30:46,058 INFO [TestMain] - Format = 1416 millisecond
  • 2012-01-11 16:30:46,190 INFO [TestMain] - Concatenation = 134 millisecond
  • 2012-01-11 16:30:46,313 INFO [TestMain] - String Builder = 117 millisecond
  • 19
    The StringBuilder test doesn't call toString(), so it isn't a fair comparison. I suspect you'll find it's within measurement error of the performance of concatenation if you fix that bug. – Jamey Sharp Oct 31 '12 at 2:33
  • 12
    In the concatenation and format tests, you asked for a String. The StringBuilder test, to be fair, needs a final step that turns the StringBuilder's contents into a String. You do that by calling bldString.toString(). I hope that explains it? – Jamey Sharp Nov 21 '13 at 2:47
  • 4
    Jamey Sharp is exactly right. Invoking bldString.toString() is about the same if not slower than string concatenation. – Akos Cz Dec 3 '13 at 20:18
  • 2
    String s = bldString.toString(); The timings were with concatenation and stringbuilder almost on par with each other: Format = 1520 millisecond , Concatenation = 167 millisecond, String Builder = 173 millisecond I ran them in a loop and averaged each out to get a good rep: (pre-jvm optimization, will try a 10000+ loop when I get time) – TechTrip Apr 1 '14 at 23:43
  • 1
    How do you guys even know wether the code is executed at all? The variables are never read or used, you can't be sure that JIT doesn't remove this code in a first place. – alobodzk May 15 '17 at 12:25

One problem with .format is that you lose static type safety. You can have too few arguments for your format, and you can have the wrong types for the format specifiers - both leading to an IllegalFormatException at runtime, so you might end up with logging code that breaks production.

In contrast, the arguments to + can be tested by the compiler.

  • 8
    just for the record, modern IDEs (e.g. IntelliJ) assist in arguments count and type matching – Ron Klein Apr 16 '15 at 12:41
  • 2
    Good point about compilation, I recommend you do these checks via FindBugs (which can run in the IDE or via Maven during the build), note that this will also check formatting in all of your logging ! This works regardless of the users IDE – Christophe Roussy Aug 18 '16 at 9:03

Which one is more readable depends on how your head works.

You got your answer right there.

It's a matter of personal taste.

String concatenation is marginally faster, I suppose, but that should be negligible.

  • 2
    I agree. Thinking about performance differences here is mainly just premature optimisation - in the unlikely event that profiling shows there's a problem here, then worry about it. – Jonik May 29 '09 at 11:01
  • 3
    It's only really a matter of personal taste if the project is small and never intended to be internationalised in any meaningful sense. Otherwise String.format wins out over concatenation in every way. – workmad3 May 29 '09 at 11:07
  • 4
    I disagree. No matter how large the project is, you're hardly going to localise every string that's ever constructed within it. In other words, it depends on the situation (what are the strings used for). – Jonik May 29 '09 at 11:13
  • I can't imagine how anybody would ever consider 'String.format("%s%s", a, b)' to be more readable than 'a+b', and given the order-of-magnitude difference in speed that answer seems clear to me (in situations which will not require localization such as debug or most logging statements). – BobDoolittle May 30 '17 at 23:40

Here's a test with multiple sample sizes in milliseconds.

public class Time {

public static String sysFile = "/sys/class/camera/rear/rear_flash";
public static String cmdString = "echo %s > " + sysFile;

public static void main(String[] args) {

  int i = 1;
  for(int run=1; run <= 12; run++){
      for(int test =1; test <= 2 ; test++){
        System.out.println(
                String.format("\nTEST: %s, RUN: %s, Iterations: %s",run,test,i));
        test(run, i);
      }
      System.out.println("\n____________________________");
      i = i*3;
  }
}

public static void test(int run, int iterations){

      long start = System.nanoTime();
      for( int i=0;i<iterations; i++){
          String s = "echo " + i + " > "+ sysFile;
      }
      long t = System.nanoTime() - start;   
      String r = String.format("  %-13s =%10d %s", "Concatenation",t,"nanosecond");
      System.out.println(r) ;


     start = System.nanoTime();       
     for( int i=0;i<iterations; i++){
         String s =  String.format(cmdString, i);
     }
     t = System.nanoTime() - start; 
     r = String.format("  %-13s =%10d %s", "Format",t,"nanosecond");
     System.out.println(r);

      start = System.nanoTime();          
      for( int i=0;i<iterations; i++){
          StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder("echo ");
          b.append(i).append(" > ").append(sysFile);
          String s = b.toString();
      }
     t = System.nanoTime() - start; 
     r = String.format("  %-13s =%10d %s", "StringBuilder",t,"nanosecond");
     System.out.println(r);
}

}

TEST: 1, RUN: 1, Iterations: 1
  Concatenation =     14911 nanosecond
  Format        =     45026 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =      3509 nanosecond

TEST: 1, RUN: 2, Iterations: 1
  Concatenation =      3509 nanosecond
  Format        =     38594 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =      3509 nanosecond

____________________________

TEST: 2, RUN: 1, Iterations: 3
  Concatenation =      8479 nanosecond
  Format        =     94438 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =      5263 nanosecond

TEST: 2, RUN: 2, Iterations: 3
  Concatenation =      4970 nanosecond
  Format        =     92976 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =      5848 nanosecond

____________________________

TEST: 3, RUN: 1, Iterations: 9
  Concatenation =     11403 nanosecond
  Format        =    287115 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =     14326 nanosecond

TEST: 3, RUN: 2, Iterations: 9
  Concatenation =     12280 nanosecond
  Format        =    209051 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =     11818 nanosecond

____________________________

TEST: 5, RUN: 1, Iterations: 81
  Concatenation =     54383 nanosecond
  Format        =   1503113 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =     40056 nanosecond

TEST: 5, RUN: 2, Iterations: 81
  Concatenation =     44149 nanosecond
  Format        =   1264241 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =     34208 nanosecond

____________________________

TEST: 6, RUN: 1, Iterations: 243
  Concatenation =     76018 nanosecond
  Format        =   3210891 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =     76603 nanosecond

TEST: 6, RUN: 2, Iterations: 243
  Concatenation =     91222 nanosecond
  Format        =   2716773 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =     73972 nanosecond

____________________________

TEST: 8, RUN: 1, Iterations: 2187
  Concatenation =    527450 nanosecond
  Format        =  10291108 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =    885027 nanosecond

TEST: 8, RUN: 2, Iterations: 2187
  Concatenation =    526865 nanosecond
  Format        =   6294307 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =    591773 nanosecond

____________________________

TEST: 10, RUN: 1, Iterations: 19683
  Concatenation =   4592961 nanosecond
  Format        =  60114307 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =   2129387 nanosecond

TEST: 10, RUN: 2, Iterations: 19683
  Concatenation =   1850166 nanosecond
  Format        =  35940524 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =   1885544 nanosecond

  ____________________________

TEST: 12, RUN: 1, Iterations: 177147
  Concatenation =  26847286 nanosecond
  Format        = 126332877 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =  17578914 nanosecond

TEST: 12, RUN: 2, Iterations: 177147
  Concatenation =  24405056 nanosecond
  Format        = 129707207 nanosecond
  StringBuilder =  12253840 nanosecond
  • StringBuilder is absolutely the fastest method when you are appending characters in a loop, for example, when you want to create a string with one thousand 1's by adding them one by one. Here is more info: pellegrino.link/2015/08/22/… – Carlos Hoyos Dec 13 '16 at 16:09
  • I like it how you always use String.format for output :D so there is an advantage. and to be honest if we are not talking about millions of itterations, I prefer string.format for readability as your code shows the obvious advantage! – mohamnag Sep 21 at 9:24

Here's the same test as above with the modification of calling the toString() method on the StringBuilder. The results below show that the StringBuilder approach is just a bit slower than String concatenation using the + operator.

file: StringTest.java

class StringTest {

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    String formatString = "Hi %s; Hi to you %s";

    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = String.format(formatString, i, +i * 2);
    }

    long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i * 2;
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        StringBuilder bldString = new StringBuilder("Hi ");
        bldString.append(i).append("Hi to you ").append(i * 2).toString();
    }

    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println("String Builder = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");

  }
}

Shell Commands : (compile and run StringTest 5 times)

> javac StringTest.java
> sh -c "for i in \$(seq 1 5); do echo \"Run \${i}\"; java StringTest; done"

Results :

Run 1
Format = 1290 millisecond
Concatenation = 115 millisecond
String Builder = 130 millisecond

Run 2
Format = 1265 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 126 millisecond

Run 3
Format = 1303 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 127 millisecond

Run 4
Format = 1297 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 127 millisecond

Run 5
Format = 1270 millisecond
Concatenation = 114 millisecond
String Builder = 126 millisecond

String.format() is more than just concatenating strings. For example, you can display numbers in a specific locale using String.format().

However, if you don't care about localisation, there is no functional difference. Maybe the one is faster than the other, but in most cases it will be negligible..

I haven't done any specific benchmarks, but I would think that concatenation may be faster. String.format() creates a new Formatter which, in turn, creates a new StringBuilder (with a size of only 16 chars). That's a fair amount of overhead especially if you are formatting a longer string and StringBuilder keeps having to resize.

However, concatenation is less useful and harder to read. As always, it's worth doing a benchmark on your code to see which is better. The differences may be negligible in server app after your resource bundles, locales, etc are loaded in memory and the code is JITted.

Maybe as a best practice, it would be a good idea to create your own Formatter with a properly sized StringBuilder (Appendable) and Locale and use that if you have a lot of formatting to do.

There could be a perceptible difference.

String.format is quite complex and uses a regular expression underneath, so don't make it a habit to use it everywhere, but only where you need it.

StringBuilder would be an order of magnitude faster (as someone here already pointed out).

Generally, string concatenation should be prefered over String.format. The latter has two main disadvantages:

  1. It does not encode the string to be built in a local manner.
  2. The building process is encoded in a string.

By point 1, I mean that it is not possible to understand what a String.format() call is doing in a single sequential pass. One is forced to go back and forth between the format string and the arguments, while counting the position of the arguments. For short concatenations, this is not much of an issue. In these cases however, string concatenation is less verbose.

By point 2, I mean that the important part of the building process is encoded in the format string (using a DSL). Using strings to represent code has many disadvantages. It is not inherently type-safe, and complicates syntax-highlighting, code analysis, optimization, etc.

Of course, when using tools or frameworks external to the Java language, new factors can come into play.

You cannot compare String Concatenation and String.Format by the program above.

You may try this also be interchanging the position of using your String.Format and Concatenation in your code block like the below

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {      
  long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

  for( int i=0;i<1000000; i++){
    String s = String.format( "Hi %s; Hi to you %s",i, + i*2);
  }

  long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
  System.out.println("Format = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond");
  start = System.currentTimeMillis();

  for( int i=0;i<1000000; i++){
    String s = "Hi " + i + "; Hi to you " + i*2;
  }

  end = System.currentTimeMillis();
  System.out.println("Concatenation = " + ((end - start)) + " millisecond") ;
}

You will be surprised to see that Format works faster here. This is since the intial objects created might not be released and there can be an issue with memory allocation and thereby the performance.

  • 2
    have you tried your code? Concatenation is always ten time faster – Icaro Nov 9 '11 at 17:59
  • 1
    I am guessing he hasn't since he is using end before he declares it.. – MrCeeJ Apr 1 '14 at 8:40
  • what about the millis taken to execute this "System.currentTimeMillis()" :P. – rehan Mar 8 at 10:12

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