66

One feature of Pascal I found very useful was the ability to name a data type, eg

type
 person: record
             name: string;
             age: int;
         end;

var
 me: person;
 you: person;

etc

Can you do something similar in C#? I want to be able to do something like

using complexList = List<Tuple<int,string,int>>;

complexList peopleList;
anotherList otherList;

So that if I have to change the definition of the datatype, I can do it in one place.

Does C# support a way to achieve this?

61

It's not excatly what you do in Pascal, but you can use the using-directive. Have a look here on how to use it

Example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using MyList = Dummy2.CompleXList;

namespace Dummy2
{
    public class Person 
    {
    }

    public class CompleXList : List<Person> 
    { 
    }


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyList l1 = new MyList();
        }
    }
}
  • 25
    minor point: the using at the top of a file are directives, not statements; the "using statement" is the thing involving IDisposable. In particular, this is a "using alias". – Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:37
  • 2
    Of note: Also if you just name the class "MyList", the using directive is of course no longer required (and that also solves the original problem). – BrainSlugs83 Oct 20 '13 at 23:07
  • The link points to an older documentation page. While still active and accurate (and has the below link in it) here is the link to the newer page should the old page get removed. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/… – MadCityDev Dec 27 '17 at 22:14
  • Does this work for named tuples somehow? I can't make it work. What I try is this: using MyType = (TypeA a, TypeB b);. I guess I could use unnamed tuples and it would work, but I really want the names and not Item1, Item2. :( – user2173353 Feb 14 '19 at 9:51
76

Yes, it's possible. You can write:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication12
{
    using MyAlias = List<Tuple<int, string, int>>;
}

or, if declared outside the namespace:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

using MyAlias = System.Collections.Generic.List<System.Tuple<int, string, int>>;

namespace ConsoleApplication12
{
}

then use it as a type:

MyAlias test = new MyAlias();
  • 1
    have you tried this? it will not compile (assuming List<T> is the typical one); a using alias always requires the full namespace to be specified. – Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:36
  • 1
    @MarcGravell Of course I tested it, it definitely compiles and works fine. – ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:45
  • 1
    @MarcGravell Precision: it works fine if it's declared inside the namespace scope. Updating the answer. – ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:47
  • 2
    @Jodrell I very rarely see using directives inside the namespace, mainly because that is not where most tools put them. – Marc Gravell Feb 6 '13 at 10:20
  • 5
    @ken2k can you export MyAlias and used it in other source files? How do you do that? – gen Sep 1 '17 at 9:27
20

You can create a type:

class ComplexList : List<Tuple<int,string,int>> { }

This is not strictly the same as an alias but in most cases, you shouldn't see any differences.

  • @Serge-appTranslator if it weren't the same as my answer but 2 minutes later. – Jodrell Jun 26 '15 at 7:40
  • 2
    @jodrell: ouch! I guess we were typing it at the same time. You just won the race condition. BTW, your answer is excellent: I upvote it ;-) – Serge Wautier Jun 26 '15 at 8:42
  • I´ve never thought of this even though it looks so obvious when I look at it! Thanks for bringing this idea to my attention! :) – Patrik Forsberg Sep 17 '17 at 15:01
  • 5
    This doesn't work, however, if the type is sealed (e.g. you're trying to "alias" KeyValuePair<K,V>) – Liam Dawson May 16 '18 at 4:53
  • 1
    This can also fail equality checks, due to subclassing. subclassing != aliasing. – Ryan The Leach Oct 22 '18 at 1:50
15

What about inheritance?

class ComplexList : List<Tuple<int, string, int>> {}

var complexList = new ComplexList();

This seems like a similar concept but there is no direct equivalent of a type based alias in C#, only namespace aliases.

If you want to avoid type name clashing in your code, namespace aliasing is the way to go.

If you want to make a new type which "is a" instance of another type, inheritance is one option.

  • 5
    Except using inheritance will fail in all cases where the type, the alias refers to, is sealed. – Alexander Morou Nov 16 '15 at 1:25
  • 7
    However, if you do it like this and declare a void Foo(ComplexList a) method, calling it as Foo(new List<Tuple<int,string,int>>(); will be a type error, despite the types being isomorphic. – cemper93 Dec 18 '15 at 16:42
  • 1
    Inheritance is FAR from a benefit unless you actually want the features of subclassing. In any other case, this adds overhead, indirection, slowness, and unreliability. You're furthermore restricted to not be able to use the class with libraries which are relying upon a given type. In fact, the meaning of the word "alias" REQUIRES that the type still be the same. Inheritance, in other words, is NOT aliasing. Aliasing would allow you to pass the object into a method which did not share the alias without any form of casting. – Zane Claes Jun 29 '18 at 15:46
  • @ZaneClaes, I've removed the "(With Benefits.)" part from my answer. I disagree that the meaning of the word alias, in general, carries any specific meaning for type systems. However C# inheritance is not a strong equivalent for a Pascal alias but there is no strong equivalent. In Hindsight, I'd me more drawn to the accepted answer. – Jodrell Jul 2 '18 at 7:53
  • 1
    @Jodrell according to the dictionary definition of "alias" in "computing": "an alternative name or label that refers to [...] an item and can be used to locate it." By definition, therefore, a subclass cannot be an alias because it does not refer to or locate the superclass; it is a new entity entirely. At a compiler level, the two are not equivalent or alternative versions of each other. – Zane Claes Jul 2 '18 at 14:29
5

From the syntax shown in the initial question, it looks like you're really just asking how to make a class in C#, and not how to alias a type.

If you want a simpler name to type than List<Tuple<int,string,int>>, and you want it to be "global" (i.e. not per-file), I would create a new class that inherited said class and declared no additional members. Like this:

public class MyTrinaryTupleList: List<Tuple<int,string,int>> { }

That gives one single location of management, and no need for additional using statements.

However, I would also take it a step further, and venture that you probably don't want a Tuple, but rather another class, such as:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public int FavoriteNumber { get; set; }

    public Person() { }

    public Person(string name, int age, int favoriteNumber) 
    { 
        this.Name = name; 
        this.Age = age; 
        this.FavoriteNumber = favoriteNumber; 
    }
}

And then for your list type you can do the following:

public class PersonList: List<Person> { }

In addition, if you need other list specific helper properties or methods you can add them to the PersonList class as well.

4

Yes you can do that, however you need to specify the full types, i.e. the definition becomes:

using ComplexList = System.Collections.Generic.List<System.Tuple<int,string,int>>;

This is specified per file, much like the using directives for namespaces.

nitpick: Conventionally, a type in .NET is PascalCased.

  • "Full types" are not required. If other using (such as using System.Collections.Generic; are present), then "full types" are not necessary. – ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:25
  • 2
    @ken2k incorrect; a using alias always requires it to be namespace-qualified explicitly, even if the existing using directives would bring it into scope; meaning: using var list = List<int>; is not valid, even after using System.Collections.Generic; – Marc Gravell Feb 13 '12 at 9:35
  • 1
    It's not required if the alias is defined inside the scope of a namespace, actually. – ken2k Feb 13 '12 at 9:50
-1

Just a simple using would do:

using Foo = System.UInt16;

public class Test {
  public Foo Bar { get;set; }
}

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