What is the simplest way of doing two way encryption in common PHP installs?

I need to be able to encrypt data with a string key, and use the same key to decrypt on the other end.

The security isn't as big of a concern as the portability of the code, so I'd like to be able to keep things as simple as possible. Currently, I am using an RC4 implementation, but if I can find something natively supported I figure I can save a lot of unnecessary code.

  • 3
    Just XOR your string. – fix_moeller Feb 13 '12 at 14:28
  • 3
    For general purpose encryption, use defuse/php-encryption/ instead of rolling your own. – Scott Arciszewski May 11 '15 at 4:37
  • 2
    Hands away from github.com/defuse/php-encryption - it is slower by orders of magnitude than mcrypt. – Eugen Rieck May 11 '15 at 16:12
  • 1
    @Scott Thinking along the lines of "this will probably not be the bottleneck" is what brought us a lot of bad software. – Eugen Rieck May 12 '15 at 14:30
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    If you're really encrypting/decrypting a lot of data to the point that the milliseconds it costs bogs your application down, bite the bullet and switch to libsodium. Sodium::crypto_secretbox() and Sodium::crypto_secretbox_open() are secure and performant. – Scott Arciszewski May 12 '15 at 18:53
up vote 171 down vote accepted

Edited:

You should really be using openssl_encrypt() & openssl_decrypt()

As Scott says, Mcrypt is not a good idea as it has not been updated since 2007.

There is even an RFC to remove Mcrypt from PHP - https://wiki.php.net/rfc/mcrypt-viking-funeral

  • 5
    @EugenRieck Yes, that's the point. Mcrypt doesn't receive patches. OpenSSL receives patches as soon as any vulnerability is discovered, big or small. – Greg Sep 7 '16 at 8:49
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    it would be better for such high-voted answer, to be there provided simplest examples too in answer. thanks anyway. – T.Todua Jan 18 at 17:33
up vote 185 down vote
+500

Important: Unless you have a very particular use-case, do not encrypt passwords, use a password hashing algorithm instead. When someone says they encrypt their passwords in a server-side application, they're either uninformed or they're describing a dangerous system design. Safely storing passwords is a totally separate problem from encryption.

Be informed. Design safe systems.

Portable Data Encryption in PHP

If you're using PHP 5.4 or newer and don't want to write a cryptography module yourself, I recommend using an existing library that provides authenticated encryption. The library I linked relies only on what PHP provides and is under periodic review by a handful of security researchers. (Myself included.)

If your portability goals do not prevent requiring PECL extensions, libsodium is highly recommended over anything you or I can write in PHP.

Update (2016-06-12): You can now use sodium_compat and use the same crypto libsodium offers without installing PECL extensions.

If you want to try your hand at cryptography engineering, read on.


First, you should take the time to learn the dangers of unauthenticated encryption and the Cryptographic Doom Principle.

  • Encrypted data can still be tampered with by a malicious user.
  • Authenticating the encrypted data prevents tampering.
  • Authenticating the unencrypted data does not prevent tampering.

Encryption and Decryption

Encryption in PHP is actually simple (we're going to use openssl_encrypt() and openssl_decrypt() once you have made some decisions about how to encrypt your information. Consult openssl_get_cipher_methods() for a list of the methods supported on your system. The best choice is AES in CTR mode:

  • aes-128-ctr
  • aes-192-ctr
  • aes-256-ctr

There is currently no reason to believe that the AES key size is a significant issue to worry about (bigger is probably not better, due to bad key-scheduling in the 256-bit mode).

Note: We are not using mcrypt because it is abandonware and has unpatched bugs that might be security-affecting. Because of these reasons, I encourage other PHP developers to avoid it as well.

Simple Encryption/Decryption Wrapper using OpenSSL

class UnsafeCrypto
{
    const METHOD = 'aes-256-ctr';

    /**
     * Encrypts (but does not authenticate) a message
     * 
     * @param string $message - plaintext message
     * @param string $key - encryption key (raw binary expected)
     * @param boolean $encode - set to TRUE to return a base64-encoded 
     * @return string (raw binary)
     */
    public static function encrypt($message, $key, $encode = false)
    {
        $nonceSize = openssl_cipher_iv_length(self::METHOD);
        $nonce = openssl_random_pseudo_bytes($nonceSize);

        $ciphertext = openssl_encrypt(
            $message,
            self::METHOD,
            $key,
            OPENSSL_RAW_DATA,
            $nonce
        );

        // Now let's pack the IV and the ciphertext together
        // Naively, we can just concatenate
        if ($encode) {
            return base64_encode($nonce.$ciphertext);
        }
        return $nonce.$ciphertext;
    }

    /**
     * Decrypts (but does not verify) a message
     * 
     * @param string $message - ciphertext message
     * @param string $key - encryption key (raw binary expected)
     * @param boolean $encoded - are we expecting an encoded string?
     * @return string
     */
    public static function decrypt($message, $key, $encoded = false)
    {
        if ($encoded) {
            $message = base64_decode($message, true);
            if ($message === false) {
                throw new Exception('Encryption failure');
            }
        }

        $nonceSize = openssl_cipher_iv_length(self::METHOD);
        $nonce = mb_substr($message, 0, $nonceSize, '8bit');
        $ciphertext = mb_substr($message, $nonceSize, null, '8bit');

        $plaintext = openssl_decrypt(
            $ciphertext,
            self::METHOD,
            $key,
            OPENSSL_RAW_DATA,
            $nonce
        );

        return $plaintext;
    }
}

Usage Example

$message = 'Ready your ammunition; we attack at dawn.';
$key = hex2bin('000102030405060708090a0b0c0d0e0f101112131415161718191a1b1c1d1e1f');

$encrypted = UnsafeCrypto::encrypt($message, $key);
$decrypted = UnsafeCrypto::decrypt($encrypted, $key);

var_dump($encrypted, $decrypted);

Demo: https://3v4l.org/jl7qR


The above simple crypto library still is not safe to use. We need to authenticate ciphertexts and verify them before we decrypt.

Note: By default, UnsafeCrypto::encrypt() will return a raw binary string. Call it like this if you need to store it in a binary-safe format (base64-encoded):

$message = 'Ready your ammunition; we attack at dawn.';
$key = hex2bin('000102030405060708090a0b0c0d0e0f101112131415161718191a1b1c1d1e1f');

$encrypted = UnsafeCrypto::encrypt($message, $key, true);
$decrypted = UnsafeCrypto::decrypt($encrypted, $key, true);

var_dump($encrypted, $decrypted);

Demo: http://3v4l.org/f5K93

Simple Authentication Wrapper

class SaferCrypto extends UnsafeCrypto
{
    const HASH_ALGO = 'sha256';

    /**
     * Encrypts then MACs a message
     * 
     * @param string $message - plaintext message
     * @param string $key - encryption key (raw binary expected)
     * @param boolean $encode - set to TRUE to return a base64-encoded string
     * @return string (raw binary)
     */
    public static function encrypt($message, $key, $encode = false)
    {
        list($encKey, $authKey) = self::splitKeys($key);

        // Pass to UnsafeCrypto::encrypt
        $ciphertext = parent::encrypt($message, $encKey);

        // Calculate a MAC of the IV and ciphertext
        $mac = hash_hmac(self::HASH_ALGO, $ciphertext, $authKey, true);

        if ($encode) {
            return base64_encode($mac.$ciphertext);
        }
        // Prepend MAC to the ciphertext and return to caller
        return $mac.$ciphertext;
    }

    /**
     * Decrypts a message (after verifying integrity)
     * 
     * @param string $message - ciphertext message
     * @param string $key - encryption key (raw binary expected)
     * @param boolean $encoded - are we expecting an encoded string?
     * @return string (raw binary)
     */
    public static function decrypt($message, $key, $encoded = false)
    {
        list($encKey, $authKey) = self::splitKeys($key);
        if ($encoded) {
            $message = base64_decode($message, true);
            if ($message === false) {
                throw new Exception('Encryption failure');
            }
        }

        // Hash Size -- in case HASH_ALGO is changed
        $hs = mb_strlen(hash(self::HASH_ALGO, '', true), '8bit');
        $mac = mb_substr($message, 0, $hs, '8bit');

        $ciphertext = mb_substr($message, $hs, null, '8bit');

        $calculated = hash_hmac(
            self::HASH_ALGO,
            $ciphertext,
            $authKey,
            true
        );

        if (!self::hashEquals($mac, $calculated)) {
            throw new Exception('Encryption failure');
        }

        // Pass to UnsafeCrypto::decrypt
        $plaintext = parent::decrypt($ciphertext, $encKey);

        return $plaintext;
    }

    /**
     * Splits a key into two separate keys; one for encryption
     * and the other for authenticaiton
     * 
     * @param string $masterKey (raw binary)
     * @return array (two raw binary strings)
     */
    protected static function splitKeys($masterKey)
    {
        // You really want to implement HKDF here instead!
        return [
            hash_hmac(self::HASH_ALGO, 'ENCRYPTION', $masterKey, true),
            hash_hmac(self::HASH_ALGO, 'AUTHENTICATION', $masterKey, true)
        ];
    }

    /**
     * Compare two strings without leaking timing information
     * 
     * @param string $a
     * @param string $b
     * @ref https://paragonie.com/b/WS1DLx6BnpsdaVQW
     * @return boolean
     */
    protected static function hashEquals($a, $b)
    {
        if (function_exists('hash_equals')) {
            return hash_equals($a, $b);
        }
        $nonce = openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(32);
        return hash_hmac(self::HASH_ALGO, $a, $nonce) === hash_hmac(self::HASH_ALGO, $b, $nonce);
    }
}

Usage Example

$message = 'Ready your ammunition; we attack at dawn.';
$key = hex2bin('000102030405060708090a0b0c0d0e0f101112131415161718191a1b1c1d1e1f');

$encrypted = SaferCrypto::encrypt($message, $key);
$decrypted = SaferCrypto::decrypt($encrypted, $key);

var_dump($encrypted, $decrypted);

Demos: raw binary, base64-encoded


If anyone wishes to use this SaferCrypto library in a production environment, or your own implementation of the same concepts, I strongly recommend reaching out to your resident cryptographers for a second opinion before you do. They'll be able tell you about mistakes that I might not even be aware of.

You will be much better off using a reputable cryptography library.

  • 3
    So, I am just trying to get the UnsafeCrypto working first. The encryption happens fine, but every time I run the decrypt, I am getting 'false' as the response. I am using the same key to decrypt, and passing true on the encode, as well as the decode. There is, what I assume is a typeo in the example, I am wondering if that is where my problem is coming from. Can you explain where the $mac variable is coming from, and should it simply be $iv? – David C Jul 6 '15 at 21:33
  • 1
    @EugenRieck The OpenSSL cipher implementations are probably the only parts that don't suck, and it's the only way to leverage AES-NI in vanilla PHP. If you install on OpenBSD, PHP will be compiled against LibreSSL without the PHP code noticing a difference. Libsodium > OpenSSL any day. Also, don't use libmcrypt. What would you recommend PHP developers use instead of OpenSSL? – Scott Arciszewski Jul 22 '15 at 15:43
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    Neither 5.2 nor 5.3 are supported anymore. You should instead look into updating to a supported version of PHP, such a 5.6. – Scott Arciszewski Sep 6 '15 at 20:19
  • 1
    @BBeta paragonie.com/blog/2015/09/… – Scott Arciszewski Apr 6 '17 at 18:45
  • 1
    I just did it as a demonstration of you want binary strings, not human-readabale strings, for your keys. – Scott Arciszewski Aug 26 '17 at 16:10

Use mcrypt_encrypt() and mcrypt_decrypt() with corresponding parameters. Really easy and straight forward, and you use a battle-tested encryption package.

EDIT

5 years and 4 months after this answer, the mcrypt extension is now in the process of deprecation and eventual removal from PHP.

  • 29
    Battle tested and not updated for more than 8 years? – Maarten Bodewes Oct 9 '14 at 9:57
  • 1
    Well, mcrypt is in PHP7 and not deprecated - that's good enough for me. Not all code is of OpenSSL's horrible quality and needs patching every few days. – Eugen Rieck May 11 '16 at 4:30
  • 2
    mcrypt is not just horrible with regards to support. It also doesn't implement best practices like PKCS#7 compliant padding, authenticated encryption. It won't support SHA-3 or any other new algorithm as nobody is maintaining it, robbing you of an upgrade path. Furthermore it used to accept things like partial keys, performing zero padding etc. There is a good reason why it is in the process of being gradually removed from PHP. – Maarten Bodewes May 12 '16 at 15:09
  • 2
    In PHP 7.1, all mcrypt_* functions will raise an E_DEPRECATED notice. In PHP 7.1+1 (be it 7.2 or 8.0), the mcrypt extension will be moved out of core and into PECL, where people who really want to install it may still do so if they can install PHP extensions from PECL. – Mladen Janjetovic May 20 '16 at 11:59
  • 2
    you are invited to the funeral : wiki.php.net/rfc/mcrypt-viking-funeral – Jean-Christophe Meillaud Jun 9 '16 at 8:43

Here is simple but secure enough implementation:

  • AES-256 encryption in CBC mode
  • PBKDF2 to create encryption key out of plain-text password
  • HMAC to authenticate the encrypted message.

Code and examples are here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/19445173/1387163

  • I'm not a cryptography expert, but having a key derived directly from a password seems like terrible idea. Rainbow tables + weak password and gone is your security. Also your link point to mcrypt functions, that are deprecated since PHP 7.1 – Alph.Dev Apr 22 at 10:45

PHP 7.2 moved completely away from Mcrypt and the encryption now is based on the maintainable Libsodium library.

All your encryption needs can be basically resolved through Libsodium library.

// On Alice's computer:
$msg = 'This comes from Alice.';
$signed_msg = sodium_crypto_sign($msg, $secret_sign_key);


// On Bob's computer:
$original_msg = sodium_crypto_sign_open($signed_msg, $alice_sign_publickey);
if ($original_msg === false) {
    throw new Exception('Invalid signature');
} else {
    echo $original_msg; // Displays "This comes from Alice."
}

Libsodium documentation: https://github.com/paragonie/pecl-libsodium-doc

  • if you paste some code, make sure that all variables are covered. In your example $secret_sign_key and $alice_sign_publickey are NULL – undefinedman Nov 15 at 13:55
  • @undefinedman you missed the point here. – Hemerson Varela Nov 15 at 15:17

Super simple one-lined native ways to OBFUSCATE (pseudo encrypt/decrypt), without any keys or external libraries:

These are the simplest ways of doing two way obfuscation in common PHP installs.

  • Could you please explain your downvote?? The answer is precise and clear, have you read the main question completely? – Heitor Feb 20 at 21:48
  • I know the original author wasn't after high-level security, but you can't really call these functions "encryption" at all. They're more encoding or obfuscation (if you're generous). – Simon East Jun 20 at 4:49
  • That's why it's called FAKE! – Heitor Jun 20 at 19:16
  • 1
    Obfuscation is ok when absolute secutity is not important. Not every kind of encryption is for security reasons. Sometimes you just need to obfuscate data like id of an entity. – forsberg Nov 22 at 17:51
  • Tks @forsberg this is exactly my point! – Heitor Nov 24 at 4:07

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