61

How do I detect whether the machine is joined to an Active Directory domain (versus in Workgroup mode)?

12 Answers 12

95

Don't fool with pinvoke if you don't have to.

Reference System.DirectoryServices, then call:

System.DirectoryServices.ActiveDirectory.Domain.GetComputerDomain()

Throws an ActiveDirectoryObjectNotFoundException if the machine is not domain-joined. The Domain object that's returned contains the Name property you're looking for.

11
  • 3
    I always love to find that exists a managed version of almost anything. Sep 15, 2010 at 13:23
  • 15
    Note to others.. make sure you use GetComputerDomain() (as suggested above) and not GetCurrentDomain(). GetCurrentDomain() blocks for ages if you're not joined to a domain.
    – James
    Jul 9, 2011 at 14:57
  • 3
    There is a problem with this call as it takes about 2 mins on many configurations.
    – Ivan G.
    Sep 8, 2011 at 10:42
  • 1
    Follow-up to my previous, I was using LINQPad and using Dump() on the Domain object, which is what was taking so much time! Just accessing the Name property of the returned Domain instance is really fast. :-)
    – Norman H
    Sep 29, 2011 at 14:12
  • 2
    This solution does not work if you need to know whether the computer is joined to a domain even when it is not currently connected to the network. In that case it will throw an ActiveDirectoryObjectNotFoundException. Nov 20, 2012 at 23:42
30

You can PInvoke to Win32 API's such as NetGetDcName which will return a null/empty string for a non domain-joined machine.

Even better is NetGetJoinInformation which will tell you explicitly if a machine is unjoined, in a workgroup or in a domain.

Using NetGetJoinInformation I put together this, which worked for me:

public class Test
{
    public static bool IsInDomain()
    {
        Win32.NetJoinStatus status = Win32.NetJoinStatus.NetSetupUnknownStatus;
        IntPtr pDomain = IntPtr.Zero;
        int result = Win32.NetGetJoinInformation(null, out pDomain, out status);
        if (pDomain != IntPtr.Zero)
        {
            Win32.NetApiBufferFree(pDomain);
        }
        if (result == Win32.ErrorSuccess)
        {
            return status == Win32.NetJoinStatus.NetSetupDomainName;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new Exception("Domain Info Get Failed", new Win32Exception());
        }
    }
}

internal class Win32
{
    public const int ErrorSuccess = 0;

    [DllImport("Netapi32.dll", CharSet=CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError=true)]
    public static extern int NetGetJoinInformation(string server, out IntPtr domain, out NetJoinStatus status);

    [DllImport("Netapi32.dll")]
    public static extern int NetApiBufferFree(IntPtr Buffer);

    public enum NetJoinStatus
    {
        NetSetupUnknownStatus = 0,
        NetSetupUnjoined,
        NetSetupWorkgroupName,
        NetSetupDomainName
    }

}
5
  • 1
    Cool. But isn't there a memory leak in your function, the pDomain data returned by NetGetJoinInformation?
    – dso
    May 29, 2009 at 14:55
  • (not that a leak matters too much... as I'll be calling this once and caching it)
    – dso
    May 29, 2009 at 14:57
  • 1
    Ahh - the code sample I hacked this up from in the PInvoke site was calling NetApiBufferFree - I've added that to the sample =)
    – Rob
    May 29, 2009 at 15:10
  • 2
    It's important to note that NetGetJoinInformation returns the legacy NetBIOS domain name, rather than the domain name (hence the Net in NetGetJoinInformation)
    – Ian Boyd
    Mar 20, 2012 at 17:48
  • 2
    Instead of throw new Exception("Domain Info Get Failed"); you should do throw new Exception("Domain Info Get Failed", new Win32Exception()); insetad. The inner Win32Exception will internally call Marshal.GetLastWin32Error() and set the error code and error message for that code in the inner exception. That is why you do SetLastError=true in the p/invoke signature, so that Marshal.GetLastWin32Error() will work. Feb 17, 2017 at 21:06
23

Can also be called by using system.net

string domain = System.Net.NetworkInformation.IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties().DomainName

If the domain string is empty the machine isn't bound.

Documentation on the property returned https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/system.net.networkinformation.ipglobalproperties.domainname?view=netframework-4.7.2#System_Net_NetworkInformation_IPGlobalProperties_DomainName

4
  • 5
    This the best answer as it is both a managed solution and the fastest. May 15, 2018 at 14:20
  • 2
    This returns the primary DNS suffix for the computer which is not necessarily an indication that it's in AD. If you add a DNS suffix to a PC that's in a workgroup this returns that suffix name, not an empty string. Mar 14, 2019 at 2:44
  • 1
    @MikeLowery According to the documentation "A String instance that contains the computer's domain name. If the computer does not belong to a domain, returns Empty." learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… Mar 15, 2019 at 9:36
  • 1
    @EricHerlitz I saw the documentation. Unfortunately there's ambiguity between DNS domains and AD domains. This code appears to be addressing the former. Mar 15, 2019 at 20:08
9
ManagementObject cs;
        using(cs = new ManagementObject("Win32_ComputerSystem.Name='" + System.Environment.MachineName + "'" ))
        {
            cs.Get();
            Console.WriteLine("{0}",cs["domain"].ToString());
        }

That should allow you to get the domain. I believe it will be null or empty if you are part of a workgroup and not a domain.

Make sure to reference System.Management

4
  • It returns "WORKGROUP" if not in domain. This will work (unless you're in a domain named "WORKGROUP"!), but I'll wait for a bit to see if there is a non-WMI based approach before choosing it as the right answer.
    – dso
    May 29, 2009 at 14:38
  • Thanks for letting me know. I only have my work machine to test on and I can't exactly remove it from the domain to test.
    – Stephan
    May 29, 2009 at 14:41
  • 2
    On second thought I don't think this will work. It turns out that the name of the workgroup for my test box is actually WORKGROUP. I think its returning the workgroup name, not a fixed value, which from an API perspective makes more sense, but it means you can't use this to determine whether its domain joined.
    – dso
    May 29, 2009 at 16:31
  • +1 for method is fast, not require user to be logged in, or even require access to DC to get name
    – Mhmd
    Nov 11, 2014 at 21:19
5

Just wanted to drop Rob's Code in VB:

 Public Class Test
    Public Function IsInDomain() As Boolean
        Try
            Dim status As Win32.NetJoinStatus = Win32.NetJoinStatus.NetSetupUnknownStatus
            Dim pDomain As IntPtr = IntPtr.Zero
            Dim result As Integer = Win32.NetGetJoinInformation(Nothing, pDomain, status)

            If (pDomain <> IntPtr.Zero) Then
                Win32.NetApiBufferFree(pDomain)
            End If

            If (result = Win32.ErrorSuccess) Then
                If (status = Win32.NetJoinStatus.NetSetupDomainName) Then
                    Return True
                Else
                    Return False
                End If
            Else
                Throw New Exception("Domain Info Get Failed")
            End If
        Catch ex As Exception
            Return False
        End Try
    End Function
End Class
Public Class Win32
    Public Const ErrorSuccess As Integer = 0
    Declare Auto Function NetGetJoinInformation Lib "Netapi32.dll" (ByVal server As String, ByRef IntPtr As IntPtr, ByRef status As NetJoinStatus) As Integer
    Declare Auto Function NetApiBufferFree Lib "Netapi32.dll" (ByVal Buffer As IntPtr) As Integer
    Public Enum NetJoinStatus
        NetSetupUnknownStatus = 0
        NetSetupUnjoined
        NetSetupWorkgroupName
        NetSetupDomainName
    End Enum
End Class

As Well as Stephan's code here:

Dim cs As System.Management.ManagementObject
    Try
        cs = New System.Management.ManagementObject("Win32_ComputerSystem.Name='" + System.Environment.MachineName + "'")
        cs.Get()
        dim myDomain as string = = cs("domain").ToString
    Catch ex As Exception
    End Try


I believe that only the second code will allow you to know what domain the machine joined, even if the current user IS NOT a domain member.

4

The Environment variables could work for you.

Environment.UserDomainName

MSDN Link for some more details.

Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("USERDNSDOMAIN")

I'm not sure this environment variable exists without being in a domain.

Correct me if I'm wrong Windows Admin geeks -- I believe a computer can be in several domains so it may be more important to know what domain, if any, you are in instead of it being in any domain.

8
  • 1
    As far as I'm aware a computer can only be joined to one domain - but you may be able to login to a PC using credentials from more than one domain in that forest, or from multiple forests if there are trusts set up. It all gets a bit too complicated there though =)
    – Rob
    May 29, 2009 at 15:17
  • 1
    Environment.UserDomainName returns the computer name if the machine is not joined to domain. I suppose I can compare that with Environment.MachineName to determine if its domain joined, but I'm not sure if that will be correct in all situations.
    – dso
    May 29, 2009 at 16:26
  • 4
    @DSO - I know I'm chiming in late here but just in case someone stumbles upon this thread I just wanted to mention that even on a domain-joined machine if the user account the process is running under is a local account or system account, you can't rely on UserDomainName != MachineName.
    – Josh
    May 11, 2010 at 19:52
  • @DSO, it will be. Domains and machines share a namespace.
    – Joshua
    Dec 5, 2011 at 16:32
  • 1
    @blak3r - Because a process running as a local user on a domain-joined machine will return the machine name, not the domain name, the same as if it were not domain-joined. The suggestion was to use that as an indication of domain joined or not.
    – Josh
    Oct 2, 2012 at 14:10
4

You can check the PartOfDomain property of Win32_ComputerSystem WMI class. The MSDN says :

PartOfDomain

Data type: boolean

Access type: Read-only

If True, the computer is part of a domain. If the value is NULL, the computer is not in a domain or the status is unknown. If you unjoin the computer from a domain, the value becomes false.

/// <summary>
/// Determines whether the local machine is a member of a domain.
/// </summary>
/// <returns>A boolean value that indicated whether the local machine is a member of a domain.</returns>
/// <remarks>http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa394102%28v=vs.85%29.aspx</remarks>
public bool IsDomainMember()
{
    ManagementObject ComputerSystem;
    using (ComputerSystem = new ManagementObject(String.Format("Win32_ComputerSystem.Name='{0}'", Environment.MachineName)))
    {
        ComputerSystem.Get();
        object Result = ComputerSystem["PartOfDomain"];
        return (Result != null && (bool)Result);
    }
}   
1
  • Unlike some other answers here, this one does appear to provide a solution for determining if the computer is joined to an AD domain. Mar 15, 2019 at 20:21
3

Here's my methods with exception handling / comments which I developed based on several of the answers in this post.

  1. Gets you the domain the computer is connected to.
  2. Only returns the domain name if the user is actually logged in on a domain account.

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the domain of the logged in user.  
    /// Therefore, if computer is joined to a domain but user is logged in on local account.  String.Empty will be returned.
    /// Relavant StackOverflow Post: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/926227/how-to-detect-if-machine-is-joined-to-domain-in-c
    /// </summary>
    /// <seealso cref="GetComputerDomainName"/>
    /// <returns>Domain name if user is connected to a domain, String.Empty if not.</returns>
    static string GetUserDomainName()
    {
        string domain = String.Empty;
        try
        {
            domain = Environment.UserDomainName;
            string machineName = Environment.MachineName;
    
            if (machineName.Equals(domain,StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            {
                domain = String.Empty;
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            // Handle exception if desired, otherwise returns null
        }
        return domain;
    }
    
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the Domain which the computer is joined to.  Note: if user is logged in as local account the domain of computer is still returned!
    /// </summary>
    /// <seealso cref="GetUserDomainName"/>
    /// <returns>A string with the domain name if it's joined.  String.Empty if it isn't.</returns>
    static string GetComputerDomainName()
    {
        string domain = String.Empty;
        try
        {
            domain = System.DirectoryServices.ActiveDirectory.Domain.GetComputerDomain().Name;
        }
        catch
        {
            // Handle exception here if desired.
        }
        return domain;
    }
    
3

You might want to try using the DomainRole WMI field. Values of 0 and 2 show standalone workstation and standalone server respectively.

We are using this for XIA Configuration our network audit software so I've cribbed the method here...

/// <summary>
/// Determines whether the local machine is a member of a domain.
/// </summary>
/// <returns>A boolean value that indicated whether the local machine is a member of a domain.</returns>
/// <remarks>http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/aa394102(v=vs.85).aspx</remarks>
public bool IsDomainMember()
{
    ManagementObject ComputerSystem;
    using (ComputerSystem = new ManagementObject(String.Format("Win32_ComputerSystem.Name='{0}'", Environment.MachineName)))
    {
        ComputerSystem.Get();
        UInt16 DomainRole = (UInt16)ComputerSystem["DomainRole"];
        return (DomainRole != 0 & DomainRole != 2);
    }
}
2

The proposed solution above returns false on a domain machine if a local user is logged in.

The most reliable method i have found is via WMI:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa394102(v=vs.85).aspx (see domainrole)

1

You can check using WMI:

private bool PartOfDomain()
{
    ManagementObject manObject = new ManagementObject(string.Format("Win32_ComputerSystem.Name='{0}'", Environment.MachineName));
    return (bool)manObject["PartOfDomain"];
}
1

Domain.GetComputerDomain() can be extremely slow. In some environments it can take more than 30 seconds.

If performance matters, use GetComputerNameEx function:

    bool IsComputerInDomain()
    {
        uint domainNameCapacity = 512;
        var domainName = new StringBuilder((int)domainNameCapacity);
        GetComputerNameEx(COMPUTER_NAME_FORMAT.ComputerNameDnsDomain, domainName, ref domainNameCapacity);
        return domainName.Length > 0;
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    static extern bool GetComputerNameEx(
        COMPUTER_NAME_FORMAT NameType,
        StringBuilder lpBuffer,
        ref uint lpnSize);

    enum COMPUTER_NAME_FORMAT
    {
        ComputerNameNetBIOS,
        ComputerNameDnsHostname,
        ComputerNameDnsDomain,
        ComputerNameDnsFullyQualified,
        ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS,
        ComputerNamePhysicalDnsHostname,
        ComputerNamePhysicalDnsDomain,
        ComputerNamePhysicalDnsFullyQualified
    }

It returns the same value as systeminfo shell command.

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