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(Using Delphi 2010 + latest SQLite in WAL mode)

I'm using DISQLite (Delphi port of SQLite) with my multi-threading client application (yet to be released, so I can change the DB engine if I really have to)

My profiler clearly says it's a stupid decision, I tracked this down to 2-3 very simple SQL statements that flies when executed in a single-threaded app, but because threads locking/waiting (SQLite really doesn't perform well with multiple threads trying to write simultaneously)

I did my best to optimize my code / avoid bottlenecks, but after several weeks of hard work, I wonder now if it's not just easier to dump SQLite & choose a different DB engine(?)

My requirements are:

  1. ACID
  2. Very good simultaneous reading / writing (record level) support
  3. (Very) Fast & stable DB engine
  4. B-Tree
  5. Delphi 2010 support

I'm only using basic INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE commands with indexes, nothing fancy. So my SQL requirements are relatively basic (I don't need join or other "more advanced" sql stuff).

I'm also open to NQL solutions, as long as it support the requirements mentioned above.

My research lead to Berkley DB, which is, if I understood correctly, a modified version of SQLite with concurrent writing support, but the problem is it's not really for delphi.

I also read about Kyoto Cabinet, but then again, no delphi support :(

Any suggestion would be more than welcome,

Thanks!

  • I'm unsure about Delphi bindings, but you could take a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_DB (has bindings for most everything else) – Joachim Isaksson Feb 13 '12 at 17:16
  • 1
    @JoachimIsaksson: Thank you, yes I did look at BDB in wikipedia, I did find this: demonak.com/delphi/berkeleydb.en.shtml and "AnyDAC for Delphi Berkeley DB support", but I'm not sure this is what I want (not to mention the license cost...:( ) – TheDude Feb 13 '12 at 17:24
  • I use it for open source and I didn't see in your question that you specified open source or not, but yes, I could definitely see Oracle licensing costs being a problem. Good for open source in the same situation though :) – Joachim Isaksson Feb 13 '12 at 17:44
  • @JoachimIsaksson: sorry about that, yes my app is closed-source /commercial – TheDude Feb 13 '12 at 18:34
3

What is your application speed if:

  • You use only one DB connection for all your threads;
  • You protect your DB connection access with a global critical section.

Then you can try our Sqlite3 static binding which was compiled without thread mutex:

#define SQLITE_THREADSAFE 2
//  assuming multi-thread safety is made by caller - in our framework, there is
// only one thread using the database connection at the same time, but there could
// be multiple database connection at the same time (previous was 0 could be unsafe)
#define SQLITE_OMIT_SHARED_CACHE 1
// no need of shared cache in a threadsafe calling model

We use such a model in our mORMot ORM framework, and, associated with four levels of cache:

  • Statement cache for reuse of SQL statements, and bound parameters on the fly;
  • Global JSON result cache at the database level, which is flushed globaly on any INSERT/UPDATE;
  • Tuned record cache at the CRUD/RESTful level for specified tables or records on the server side;
  • Tuned record cache at the CRUD/RESTful level for specified tables or records on the client side.

Resulting performance are not bad at all - it scales well in multi-thread access, even with a global critical section. Of course, SQlite3 was not designed to scale as well as Oracle! But I've used SQlite on real applications, with a lot of client. You may consider using FireBird which has a more complex (and tuned) architecture for client-server.

About making writing faster, you can group your writings into a transaction, then it will be much faster. This is what I use for speed-up writing and you can extend this concept with multiple clients: on the server side, you regroup your writes into a shared transaction, which is to be committed after a timeout period (e.g. one second).

SQLite3 is very fast for such adding (even more with a prepared INSERT statement with bound parameters), but slow for individual addings, because it has to lock the whole file using low-level API, which is damn slow. In order to make it ACID, ensure that the commit is always processed. In fact, other DB engines achieve good concurrent speed with a similar process, hidden in the background. SQLite3 default writing method is expected to be such, in order to ensure access to the same file from multiple processes - but in your Client-Server application, you can just rely on the fact that you'll be the only one to access to the SQLite3 database file, so it will be just safe.

  • thank you, read performance is OK with WAL, my problem is actually with concurrent writing, which sadly SQLite doesn't support :( – TheDude Feb 14 '12 at 22:58
  • As for my app performance, it's very slow with a single thread. I try to use critical sections only where required (once the begining and once in the end of each thread - only to write to the DB). A lot of good stuff in your post, I'll look into it, thanks a lot! – TheDude Feb 14 '12 at 22:59
  • About making writing faster, you can group your writings into a transaction, then it will be much faster. This is what I use in blog.synopse.info/post/2011/06/03/BATCH-sequences-for-adding/… and you can extend this concept with multiple clients: on the server side, you regroup your writes into a shared transaction, which is to be committed after a timeout period (e.g. one second). SQLite3 is very fast for such adding (even more with a prepared INSERT statement with bound parameters), but slow for individual addings. This is what other Client-Server DB do. – Arnaud Bouchez Feb 15 '12 at 8:07
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    I also found out that defining exclusive access mode is able to increase the performance a lot, in both reading and writing speed. But your process should be the only one to access the file. See blog.synopse.info/post/2013/06/14/… and sqlite.org/pragma.html#pragma_locking_mode – Arnaud Bouchez Jul 5 '13 at 8:15
2

Would something like the Embedded version of Firebird DB be of any help?

FirbirdSQL.org Downloads Page

I've used this with success in the past.

  • Interesting...FireFird definitely seems to be a good choice. I'll look into it (I wonder how it compares in term of speed with SQLite...) – TheDude Feb 13 '12 at 18:38
  • @Gdhami: I've used both and while the embedded version of FB is a little heavier that SQLite, it has all of the features of the full blown version of FB. With the exception of single user vs. multi-user of course. Once the engine is loaded into memory I would expect that the speed difference would be minimal. – Ryan J. Mills Feb 15 '12 at 7:55
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Just split your tables (which could be written concurrently) into separate SQLite database files and attach them all together using your main connection.

  • Thank you, yes, I actually did something like that (didn't attach them though: it would mean losing ACIDity since I'm using WAL)...it did help - a lot, but my profiler says some very simple SQL queries takes like 20+ seconds to execute in multi-threading, while it takes like less than 0.01 ms in single threaded mode! (it's not typical, but it happen enough to slow the whole operation) – TheDude Feb 13 '12 at 19:48
  • Are you sure you weren't doing something wrong? Such a big difference between same queries is very strange and unlikely. Also another solution would be to stop using WAL. – Linas Feb 13 '12 at 20:04
  • could be yes. I sent a message to the DISQLite author regarding these slow queries, we'll see how it goes. – TheDude Feb 14 '12 at 22:51
0

This is my point:

Absolute Database is a good alternative.

  • Thank you! I actually switched away from Absolute to DISQLite last summer (been using it for 6 years). AFAIK, with AbsoluteDB, you either have concurrent writing support or ACIDity, but you can't have both – TheDude Feb 13 '12 at 17:32
  • I used both v5 & v6 (both for D2010 & D7) – TheDude Feb 13 '12 at 17:50
0

NexusDB can do all that, and the Embedded Version is free. It supports Delphi as a first class citizen.

  • Thank you, I'll take a look at it! – TheDude Feb 14 '12 at 10:47
0

FWIW, I finally decided to stick to DISQLite along with this "ugly", hackish, solution:

  • Made some (not-so-minor) changes to minimize writing to DB inside threads as much as possible (Two DB inserts required in each thread)

  • When I absolutely had to write something to DB while working inside threads, I took the SQL query parameters & wrote them in a special folder (writing to files is very fast), ie.

C:\my-project\pending-sql\insert_SOME-GUID.txt

Each file would look like this:

Param1|Param2|Param3|Param4|

  • Once I'm done with the threads (or if my app crashes), I called a routine that scanned this folder, extracted the SQL parameters and run them using prepared statements (wrapped inside a transaction).

  • Any file containing less than, say, 4 parameters would be considered corrupt and would be skipped.

This is one heck of hackish ugly algorithm (shame on me!), but it works, it's fast, it's (sort of) ACID, and I don't have to spend months learning another DB engine that may (or may not) be suitable.

I just wanted to thank everyone for their help, time pressure makes it impossible for me to switch to another DB engine, at least for this project.

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