I'm partial to using member initialization lists with my constructors... but I've long since forgotten the reasons behind this...

Do you use member initialization lists in your constructors? If so, why? If not, why not?

up vote 226 down vote accepted

For POD class members, it makes no difference, it's just a matter of style. For class members which are classes, then it avoids an unnecessary call to a default constructor. Consider:

class A
{
public:
    A() { x = 0; }
    A(int x_) { x = x_; }
    int x;
};

class B
{
public:
    B()
    {
        a.x = 3;
    }
private:
    A a;
};

In this case, the constructor for B will call the default constructor for A, and then initialize a.x to 3. A better way would be for B's constructor to directly call A's constructor in the initializer list:

B()
  : a(3)
{
}

This would only call A's A(int) constructor and not its default constructor. In this example, the difference is negligible, but imagine if you will that A's default constructor did more, such as allocating memory or opening files. You wouldn't want to do that unnecessarily.

Furthermore, if a class doesn't have a default constructor, or you have a const member variable, you must use an initializer list:

class A
{
public:
    A(int x_) { x = x_; }
    int x;
}

class B
{
public:
    B() : a(3), y(2)  // 'a' and 'y' MUST be initialized in an initializer list;
    {                 // it is an error not to do so
    }
private:
    A a;
    const int y;
};
  • 3
    a must is also for important case of a reference – 4pie0 May 6 '14 at 12:38
  • 3
    Why not use "a(3);" or "a = A(3);" in the body of B's default constructor? – Sergey Mar 6 '15 at 10:07
  • 1
    Could you explain, what you mean with POD? – Jonas Stein Nov 19 '15 at 11:12
  • 2
    @JonasStein POD is a well-defined set of rules pertaining to simple data structures (rather than complete classes). Read the FAQ for more: stackoverflow.com/questions/146452/what-are-pod-types-in-c – monkey0506 Mar 28 '16 at 4:02
  • 1
    @Sergey, The A's default constructor would still be called. – Vassilis May 2 '17 at 18:24

Apart from the performance reasons mentioned above, if your class stores references to objects passed as constructor parameters or your class has const variables then you don't have any choice except using initializer lists.

  • 7
    Same goes for const members I believe. – Richard Corden May 29 '09 at 16:44
  • yes, Cannot use assignment to modify the const variables so it must be initialized. – Hareen Laks Apr 14 at 13:53
  1. Initialization of base class

One important reason for using constructor initializer list which is not mentioned in answers here is initialization of base class.

As per the order of construction, base class should be constructed before child class. Without constructor initializer list, this is possible if your base class has default constructor which will be called just before entering the constructor of child class.

But, if your base class has only parameterized constructor, then you must use constructor initializer list to ensure that your base class is initialized before child class.

  1. Initialization of Subobjects which only have parameterized constructors

  2. Efficiency

Using constructor initializer list, you initialize your data members to exact state which you need in your code rather than first initializing them to their default state & then changing their state to the one you need in your code.

  1. Initializing non-static const data members

If non-static const data members in your class have default constructors & you don't use constructor initializer list, you won't be able to initialize them to intended state as they will be initialized to their default state.

  1. Initialization of reference data members

Reference data members must be intialized when compiler enters constructor as references can't be just declared & initialized later. This is possible only with constructor initializer list.

Next to the performance issues, there is another one very important which I'd call code maintainability and extendibility.

If a T is POD and you start preferring initialization list, then if one time T will change to a non-POD type, you won't need to change anything around initialization to avoid unnecessary constructor calls because it is already optimised.

If type T does have default constructor and one or more user-defined constructors and one time you decide to remove or hide the default one, then if initialization list was used, you don't need to update code if your user-defined constructors because they are already correctly implemented.

Same with const members or reference members, let's say initially T is defined as follows:

struct T
{
    T() { a = 5; }
private:
    int a;
};

Next, you decide to qualify a as const, if you would use initialization list from the beginning, then this was a single line change, but having the T defined as above, it also requires to dig the constructor definition to remove assignment:

struct T
{
    T() : a(5) {} // 2. that requires changes here too
private:
    const int a; // 1. one line change
};

It's not a secret that maintenance is far easier and less error-prone if code was written not by a "code monkey" but by an engineer who makes decisions based on deeper consideration about what he is doing.

Before the body of the constructor is run, all of the constructors for its parent class and then for its fields are invoked. By default, the no-argument constructors are invoked. Initialization lists allow you to choose which constructor is called and what arguments that constructor receives.

If you have a reference or a const field, or if one of the classes used does not have a default constructor, you must use an initialization list.

// Without Initializer List
class MyClass {
    Type variable;
public:
    MyClass(Type a) {  // Assume that Type is an already
                     // declared class and it has appropriate 
                     // constructors and operators
        variable = a;
    }
};

Here compiler follows following steps to create an object of type MyClass
1. Type’s constructor is called first for “a”.
2. The assignment operator of “Type” is called inside body of MyClass() constructor to assign

variable = a;
  1. And then finally destructor of “Type” is called for “a” since it goes out of scope.

    Now consider the same code with MyClass() constructor with Initializer List

    // With Initializer List
     class MyClass {
    Type variable;
    public:
    MyClass(Type a):variable(a) {   // Assume that Type is an already
                     // declared class and it has appropriate
                     // constructors and operators
    }
    };
    

    With the Initializer List, following steps are followed by compiler:

    1. Copy constructor of “Type” class is called to initialize : variable(a). The arguments in initializer list are used to copy construct “variable” directly.
    2. Destructor of “Type” is called for “a” since it goes out of scope.
  • 2
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation out of the code really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations! meta.stackexchange.com/q/114762/308249 – davejal Nov 25 '15 at 3:12
  • 2
    Please, write your own understanding or just share link to original source (here, geeksforgeeks.com) instead of just copy-pasting it. – yuvi Dec 3 '16 at 2:51

Syntax:

  class Sample
  {
     public:
         int Sam_x;
         int Sam_y;

     Sample(): Sam_x(1), Sam_y(2)     /* Classname: Initialization List */
     {
           // Constructor body
     }
  };

Need of Initialization list:

 class Sample
 {
     public:
         int Sam_x;
         int Sam_y;

     Sample()     */* Object and variables are created - i.e.:declaration of variables */*
     { // Constructor body starts 

         Sam_x = 1;      */* Defining a value to the variable */* 
         Sam_y = 2;

     } // Constructor body ends
  };

in the above program, When the class’s constructor is executed, Sam_x and Sam_y are created. Then in constructor body, those member data variables are defined.

Use cases:

  1. Const and Reference variables in a Class

In C, variables must be defined during creation. the same way in C++, we must initialize the Const and Reference variable during object creation by using Initialization list. if we do initialization after object creation (Inside constructor body), we will get compile time error.

  1. Member objects of Sample1 (base) class which do not have default constructor

     class Sample1 
     {
         int i;
         public:
         Sample1 (int temp)
         {
            i = temp;
         }
     };
    
      // Class Sample2 contains object of Sample1 
     class Sample2
     {
      Sample1  a;
      public:
      Sample2 (int x): a(x)      /* Initializer list must be used */
      {
    
      }
     };
    

While creating object for derived class which will internally calls derived class constructor and calls base class constructor (default). if base class does not have default constructor, user will get compile time error. To avoid, we must have either

 1. Default constructor of Sample1 class
 2. Initialization list in Sample2 class which will call the parametric constructor of Sample1 class (as per above program)
  1. Class constructor’s parameter name and Data member of a Class are same:

     class Sample3 {
        int i;         /* Member variable name : i */  
        public:
        Sample3 (int i)    /* Local variable name : i */ 
        {
            i = i;
            print(i);   /* Local variable: Prints the correct value which we passed in constructor */
        }
        int getI() const 
        { 
             print(i);    /*global variable: Garbage value is assigned to i. the expected value should be which we passed in constructor*/
             return i; 
        }
     };
    

As we all know, local variable having highest priority then global variable if both variables are having same name. In this case, the program consider "i" value {both left and right side variable. i.e: i = i} as local variable in Sample3() constructor and Class member variable(i) got override. To avoid, we must use either

  1. Initialization list 
  2. this operator.

Just to add some additional info to demonstrate how much difference the member initialization list can mak. In the leetcode 303 Range Sum Query - Immutable, https://leetcode.com/problems/range-sum-query-immutable/, where you need to construct and initialize to zero a vector with certain size. Here is two different implementation and speed comparison.

Without member initialization list, to get AC it cost me about 212 ms.

class NumArray {
public:
vector<int> preSum;
NumArray(vector<int> nums) {
    preSum = vector<int>(nums.size()+1, 0);
    int ps = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < nums.size(); i++)
    {
        ps += nums[i];
        preSum[i+1] = ps;
    }
}

int sumRange(int i, int j) {
    return preSum[j+1] - preSum[i];
}
};

Now using member initialization list, the time to get AC is about 108 ms. With this simple example, it is quite obvious that, member initialization list is way more efficient. All the measurement is from the running time from LC.

class NumArray {
public:
vector<int> preSum;
NumArray(vector<int> nums) : preSum(nums.size()+1, 0) { 
    int ps = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < nums.size(); i++)
    {
        ps += nums[i];
        preSum[i+1] = ps;
    }
}

int sumRange(int i, int j) {
    return preSum[j+1] - preSum[i];
}
};

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