104

I have a piece of try catch code:

try 
{
    ...
}
catch(Exception ex) 
{
    ModelState.AddModelError(
        "duplicateInvoiceNumberOrganisation", "The combination of organisation and invoice number must be unique");
}

For this piece of code I'm trying to insert a record into a database: The dba has set it up so that the database checks for duplicates and returns an error if there are duplicates. Currently, as you can see, I'm adding the same error to the model no matter what error occurred. I want it changed so this error is only added to the model if it was caused by the duplicate error set up by the dba.

Below is the error I want to catch. Note it's in the inner exception. Can anyone tell me how to specifically catch this one?

enter image description here

2
  • 1
    See Davide's answer. Generally catching Exception is not a best practice. You should be as specific as possible and let anything you can't handle bubble up to the user/framework.
    – Ryan
    Feb 14, 2012 at 0:21
  • 1
    Check out this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/3967140/… Feb 14, 2012 at 0:21

5 Answers 5

178

before your current catch add the following:

catch(DbUpdateException ex)
{
  if(ex.InnerException is UpdateException)
  {
    // do what you want with ex.InnerException...
  }
}

From C# 6, you can do the following:

catch(DbUpdateException ex) when (ex.InnerException is UpdateException)
{
    // do what you want with ex.InnerException...
}
3
  • 4
    is there a catch "when not" syntax?
    – conterio
    Nov 7, 2018 at 23:28
  • 8
    @conterio catch(DbUpdateException ex) when (!(ex.InnerException is UpdateException))
    – Tom
    Aug 7, 2019 at 13:30
  • This might be helpful but unfortunately, in my case, ex.InnerException was null. What I can do is to check content of ex.Message, if there is 'timed out'-ish thing, then do something.
    – Moses
    Oct 20, 2022 at 1:55
20

Replace System.Threading.ThreadAbortException with your exception.

try
{
    //assume ThreadAbortException occurs here
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    if (ex.GetType().IsAssignableFrom(typeof(System.Threading.ThreadAbortException)))
    {
         //what you want to do when ThreadAbortException occurs         
    }
    else
    {
         //do when other exceptions occur
    }
}
0
12

Not enough rep to comment. In response to @conterio question (in @Davide Piras answer):

is there a catch "when not" syntax?

There is.

catch (Exception e) when (!(e is ArgumentException)) { }
8

To get name of the exception you can use

    catch (Exception exc){
       if (exc.GetType().FullName == "Your_Exception") 
       {
          // The same can be user for InnerExceptions
          // exc.InnerException.GetType().FullName
       }
   }
2
  • 2
    Comparing exception type by string is dangerous. An unfortunate spelling mistake is going to make exception handling a nightmare! Jan 18, 2019 at 6:36
  • 1
    Agreed. Compare the Type to a Type. exc.GetType() == typeof(YourException)
    – Lee Oades
    Feb 20, 2020 at 10:07
-3

You can take a look at the SQLException class -- and check for the contents of the exception's message if it contains what you now see in your inner exception..Something like this:

try
{
    //your code here
}
catch (SQLException ex)
{
    if (ex.Message.Contains("Cannot insert duplicate key in obj...."))
    {
        //your code here
    }
}
3
  • 1
    I doubt that SqlException is thrown directly, but only as an inner exception. Also, it would probably be better to check the error number rather than comparing against message text. Feb 14, 2012 at 0:44
  • Yup, you can check the error number as well. Thanks for the comment.
    – Ann B. G.
    Feb 14, 2012 at 0:46
  • How do you check against the error number? I'm not even sure what's it's number is as it's a really specific error?
    – AnonyMouse
    Feb 14, 2012 at 0:56

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