19

I was looking for a constructor or a init function for following situation:

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
   this.aProperty = aProperty;
   this.bProperty = bProperty;
}; 
Abc.prototype.init = function(){
   // Perform some operation
};

//Creating a new Abc object using Constructor.

var currentAbc = new Abc(obj,obj);

//currently I write this statement:
currentAbc.init();

Is there a way to call init function when new object is initialized?

0
23

You can just call init() from the constructor function

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
   this.aProperty = aProperty;
   this.bProperty = bProperty;
   this.init();
}; 

Here is a fiddle demonstrating: http://jsfiddle.net/CHvFk/

1
  • 5
    The drawback I see in this pattern is that init is public. It can be called like a.init(). Usualy init functions are private. Therefore, it might be good to define it in the constructor. See fiddle update
    – Buzut
    Sep 25 '15 at 10:29
17

Updated for 2020

While at the time of answering this questions classes were not widely available in JavaScript, this is no longer the case. Most major browsers now support the ES2015 class syntax, and with the prevalence of JavaScript transpilers providing backwards compatibility for those environments which don't support it, classes are now fairly safe to use and will look more natural to those coming to JavaScript from common OOP languages.

ES2015 Class version

class Abc {
  constructor (aProperty, bProperty) {
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;

    this.init();
  }

  init () {
    // Initialization code here.
  }
}

let currentAbc = new Abc(obj, obj);

The private version is much the same as it was previously, since visibility keywords are not provided in the new class syntax

class Abc {
  constructor (aProperty, bProperty) {
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;

    this.init = function () {
      // Initialization code here.
    }

    this.init();
  }
}

let currentAbc = new Abc(obj, obj);

There is also the option of creating the class in closure, which is what I believe some compilers may do to ensure that the function is private at runtime.

const Abc = (function() {
  function privateInit () {
    // Do initialization here
  }

  return class Abc {
    constructor (aProperty, bProperty) {
      this.aProperty = aProperty;
      this.bProperty = bProperty;

      privateInit.call(this);
    }
  };
})();

const currentAbc = new Abc(obj, obj);

If you're using a superset such as TypeScript, you can simply implement the init function privately, although this is only a compiler check, so it protects you from yourself, but not from external code.

class Abc {
  aProperty: any;
  bProperty: any;

  constructor (aProperty: any, bProperty: any) {
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;

    this.init();
  }

  private init () {
    // Initialization code here.
  }
}

let currentAbc = new Abc(obj, obj);

Original Answer

Perhaps something like this?

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;
    this.init = function(){
        // Do things here.
    }
    this.init();
}; 
var currentAbc = new Abc(obj,obj);
1
  • 4
    This is correct, you must call the init() function AFTER you define it.
    – Wes
    Mar 17 '14 at 18:46
5

if your init method should stay private :

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
   function privateInit(){ console.log(this.aProperty);}   
   this.aProperty = aProperty;
   this.bProperty = bProperty;

   privateInit.apply(this);
};

i like this more.

1

What about this?

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;

    //init
    (function () {
        // Perform some operation
    }.call(this));
}; 
var currentAbc = new Abc(obj,obj);
0

Why not put the stuff in init function to cunstructor, like this:

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;

    // Perform some operation

}; 
2
  • 1
    Why are functions being used? To reduce redundancy and modularity of your code. Thats why I want it as a function. Feb 14 '12 at 3:40
  • Defenitely not a comment that should be downvoted. In fact you almost always call the contructor function only one time and your function would just be not more then a #region statement.
    – Ini
    Jun 10 '18 at 12:24
0

The constructor should be the place to initialize your instance. If the init method is not supposed to be rerun keep initialization related code in the constructor and rather split the code into multiple specific submethods (preferably private) if it gets to big and messy.

That said, if you need to have the possibility to rerun or 'asynchronously' call the init method, the solution I find the most flexible is returning this from your init method. This way you can create an instance, assign it to a variable and call your still separate init method in one line.

var Abc = function(aProperty){
   this.aProperty = aProperty;
};
Abc.prototype.init = function(){
  // init stuff
  return this;
};
// either as oneliner
var abc = new Abc().init();
// or 
var abc = new Abc();
setTimeout(function(){abc.init()},500);

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