15

I wrote a stupid solution for this, any better recipe? As you can see lots of useless conversions there.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strconv"
    "math"
)

func conv(str string) int {
    l := len(str)
    result := 0.0
    for i,n := range str {
        number,_ := strconv.Atof64(string(n))
        result += math.Exp2(float64(l-i-1))*number
    }
    return int(result)
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(conv("1001"))
}
1
  • 1
    The answers below are recommended, but if you really want to do the conversion yourself, you can do it without any help from libraries. Make result an int, and for each iteration of the loop, result = (result<<1)|(n-'0') – axw Feb 14 '12 at 6:04
27

You want the strconv.ParseInt function, which converts from an arbitrary base, into a given bit size.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strconv"
)

func main() {
    if i, err := strconv.ParseInt("1001", 2, 64); err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    } else {
        fmt.Println(i)
    }
}

Playground

8

For example, on Go 1,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strconv"
)

func main() {
    i, err := strconv.ParseInt("1101", 2, 64)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    fmt.Println(i)
}

Output:

13
6
  • 2
    Wow, they sure changed the strconv package for Go 1. – Lily Ballard Feb 14 '12 at 5:39
  • How can this be real? If we convert binary to SIGNED int (using ParseInt, not ParseUint function), "1101" must return "-3". If the first bit is 1, it means than number is negative, isn't it? Did I missed something? – igronus Dec 21 '18 at 9:20
  • 1
    @igronus: "Did I missed something?" Yes, you did. Strings for negative numbers have a negative sign (-) as a prefix. For example, -3 decimal, -11 binary. – peterSO Dec 21 '18 at 12:36
  • @peterSO Really? If I read data from some hardware register (marked as containing int), I get "1101", and it equals "-3". There is no signs in binary data, only zeros and ones. – igronus Dec 23 '18 at 11:34
  • @igronus: Really. "Negative numbers are usually written with a minus sign in front." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_number The Go strconv package parses the usual case. You have a special case: two's complement binary representation. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two%27s_complement To parse two's complement binary representation, write a simple Go function. play.golang.org/p/x_JtICLB6Pv – peterSO Dec 23 '18 at 16:57

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