12
public boolean clearSelection() {
    int i = 0;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty()) {
        i = 1;
        Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
        while (localIterator.hasNext())
            ((AnnotComponent) localIterator.next()).remove();
        this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
    }

    return i;
}

How to convert the integer to boolean?

  • 4
    Java is not like C++.In C++ 0 is false and other integers are true, in Java integer can't be used as boolean. – shift66 Feb 14 '12 at 4:57
  • What is the purpose of the integer? There is no obvious reason to use anything else than boolean for your example. @shift66 That feature isn't C++ specific. It's a general rule. I can't remeber another language beside JAVA which can't convert int to bool. – The incredible Jan Apr 6 '17 at 12:55
41

Try using this return

return i == 1;

or just use a boolean to start (with a better name):

 public boolean clearSelection()
  {
    boolean flag = false;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty())
    {
      flag = true;
      Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
      while (localIterator.hasNext())
        ((AnnotComponent)localIterator.next()).remove();
      this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
    }
    return flag;
  }

It continues to mystify me why people use i -- a horrible variable name. Looks like 1 and does not convey any meaning.

  • 12
    Concerning i: "There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things" -- Phil Karlton – John Dvorak Dec 10 '12 at 17:38
  • 2
    @Hogan Not sure which font you're using, it sure don't look like a 1 in my IDE – b1nary.atr0phy Jun 5 '13 at 5:59
  • 1
    i comes from Fortran. – claymation Aug 21 '13 at 1:01
  • 4
    IMO i comes from "iterate", "iterator" – Petko Petkov Nov 9 '13 at 17:10
  • 1
    Should we define ´true´ as 1 or everything that is not 0? – osvein Feb 15 '14 at 15:59
16

May be you can just modify your return statement without much change to code as below:

return i > 0 ? true : false ;
  • Nice but what if the int equal to 0! It won't work even if you use >= because when int is null this line of code will return true always. – Mazen Kasser Jul 25 '13 at 23:20
  • 14
    The ternary operator is redundant. It's enough to write return i > 0;. – Mikołaj Rozwadowski Nov 23 '15 at 16:22
14

I know this thread is old but wanted add some code that helped me and might help others searching this...

You could use org.apache.commons.lang api to convert an int to boolean using the BooleanUtils class:

BooleanUtils.toBoolean(int value)

"Converts an int to a boolean using the convention that zero is false." (Javadocs)


Here are the Maven & Gradle dependencies, just make sure you check you're using the latest version on the link http://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.apache.commons/commons-lang3

Maven Dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.commons</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-lang3</artifactId>
    <version>3.4</version>
</dependency>

Gradle Dependency:

'org.apache.commons:commons-lang3:3.4'
  • 1
    It's things like this that give Java a bad name. Why would anyone use this instead of just value != 0? (Which results in a boolean using the convention that zero is false) – Salman Abbas Mar 13 '16 at 3:03
4

Convert int to boolean:

return i > 0;
1

Declare i as a boolean:

public boolean clearSelection()
{
    boolean i = false;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty())
    {
        i = true;
        Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
        while (localIterator.hasNext())
          ((AnnotComponent)localIterator.next()).remove();
        this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
    }
    return i;
}
1
public boolean clearSelection(){
    int i = 0;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty())
    {
        i = 1;
        Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
        while (localIterator.hasNext())
            ((AnnotComponent)localIterator.next()).remove();
        this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
     }
     return (i!=0);
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy