18

I want to execute the code in the try block again after an exception is caught. Is that possible somehow?

For Eg:

try
{
    //execute some code
}
catch(Exception e)
{
}

If the exception is caught I want to go in the try block again to "execute some code" and try again to execute it.

38

Put it in a loop. Possibly a while loop around a boolean flag to control when you finally want to exit.

bool tryAgain = true;
while(tryAgain){
  try{
    // execute some code;
    // Maybe set tryAgain = false;
  }catch(Exception e){
    // Or maybe set tryAgain = false; here, depending upon the exception, or saved details from within the try.
  }
}

Just be careful to avoid an infinite loop.

A better approach may be to put your "some code" within its own method, then you could call the method from both within the try and the catch as appropriate.

5

If you wrap your block in a method, you can recursively call it

void MyMethod(type arg1, type arg2, int retryNumber = 0)
{
    try
    {
        ...
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        if (retryNumber < maxRetryNumber)
            MyMethod(arg1, arg2, retryNumber+1)
        else
            throw;
    }
}

or you could do it in a loop.

int retries = 0;

while(true)
{
    try
    {
        ...
        break; // exit the loop if code completes
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        if (retries < maxRetries)
            retries++;
        else
            throw;
    }
}
  • 4
    And then you can also run into stackoverflow due to no endpoint. – Mickey Perlstein Apr 16 '12 at 9:51
  • What if that function returns some value instead of void? – Vahan Hakobyan Oct 21 at 12:40
4
int tryTimes = 0;
while (tryTimes < 2) // set retry times you want
{
    try
    {
        // do something with your retry code
        break; // if working properly, break here.
    }
    catch
    {
        // do nothing and just retry
    }
    finally
    {
        tryTimes++; // ensure whether exception or not, retry time++ here
    }
}
  • What if I want to throw an Exception if the 2nd try fails? Should I need another catch block for that? Would appreciate if you can share the syntax. – Heike Mar 20 at 15:47
  • If you want throw exception, it may be easy. just write in catch (Exception ex) { if (tryTimes == 2) throw ex; } – David Smith Mar 22 at 16:06
3

already answered in these (and other) links

Better way to write retry logic without goto

Cleanest way to write retry logic?

How can I improve this exception retry scenario?

1

There is another way to do it (though as others have mentioned, not really recommended). Here's an example using a file download retry to more closely match the retry keyword found in Ruby in VB6.

RetryLabel:

try
{
    downloadMgr.DownLoadFile("file:///server/file", "c:\\file");
    Console.WriteLine("File successfully downloaded");
}
catch (NetworkException ex)
{
    if (ex.OkToRetry)
        goto RetryLabel;
}
  • 3
    Seems a lot more clear than recursion or infinite loops to solve this particular problem. – Bill Feb 14 '12 at 5:36
  • 1
    Unfortunately, that's exactly what you potentially accomplished here - an infinite loop. If the exception occurs, and nothing is done to resolve the underlying cause, there is no retry counter or such to stop the loop. The ex.OkToRetry check might be a start to this, but it isn't clear as to if or where this would ever be set differently between true and false. – ziesemer May 20 '13 at 20:45
  • 2
    @ziesemer - the same could be said for your example which got accepted as the answer. – user1021726 Feb 25 '14 at 12:16
1

What's wrong with the ole goto?

 Start:
            try
            {
                //try this
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {

                Thread.Sleep(1000);
                goto Start;
            }
  • because they lead to spaghetti code. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3517726/… – Malcolm Salvador Jun 25 '18 at 19:15
  • @Malky.Kid, any code leads to spaghetti code if you don't refactor. Having a goto statement in one place is fine, and may actually cleanup your code.. – LastTribunal Jun 25 '18 at 19:18
  • @Malky.Kid you link reinforces my answer. "goto's are appropriate in a few places, such as for jumping out of nested loops" – LastTribunal Jun 28 '18 at 2:38
0

This should work:

count = 0;
while (!done) {
  try{
    //execute some code;
    done = true;
  }
  catch(Exception e){
  // code
  count++;
  if (count > 1) { done = true; }
  }
}
  • why use flags, you are running a for loop here. so use a for loop structure. – Mickey Perlstein Apr 16 '12 at 9:52

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