29
Type.GetType("TheClass");

Returns null if the namespace is not present like:

Type.GetType("SomeNamespace.TheClass"); // returns a Type object 

Is there any way to avoid giving the namespace name?

3
  • 4
    do you realize that you could have multiple different classes called TheClass in a project where many references have been added and the file where you try to resolve the type has many using statements? You should pass the fully qualified name including namespace like when you reference yourself in a document you write First name and Last name. Which of many TheClass classes should the compiler use in case of many present? Namespace tells which one. – Davide Piras Feb 14 '12 at 8:20
  • I would throw ArgumentException instead of just return null. You can't distinguish without Namespace – gdoron is supporting Monica Feb 14 '12 at 8:26
  • possible duplicate of Getting a System.Type from type's partial name – nawfal Aug 19 '14 at 7:35
51

I've used a helper method that searches all loaded Assemblys for a Type matching the specified name. Even though in my code only one Type result was expected it supports multiple. I verify that only one result is returned every time I used it and suggest you do the same.

/// <summary>
/// Gets a all Type instances matching the specified class name with just non-namespace qualified class name.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="className">Name of the class sought.</param>
/// <returns>Types that have the class name specified. They may not be in the same namespace.</returns>
public static Type[] getTypeByName(string className)
{
    List<Type> returnVal = new List<Type>();

    foreach (Assembly a in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies())
    {
        Type[] assemblyTypes = a.GetTypes();
        for (int j = 0; j < assemblyTypes.Length; j++)
        {
            if (assemblyTypes[j].Name == className)
            {
                returnVal.Add(assemblyTypes[j]);
            }
        }
    }

    return returnVal.ToArray();
}
3
  • 22
    +1 for answering the question instead of piling on the flame war above. – John Livermore Aug 29 '13 at 18:49
  • 2
    another answer that is from someone who knows instead of dont use no namespace bla bla :) ty for answer – MonsterMMORPG Mar 1 '16 at 10:52
  • fantastic, does what it says. The main thing I would add to this would be to use assemblyTypes[j].Name.EqualsIgnoreCase(className). – sirthomas Feb 9 '17 at 1:04
11

There is no need to complicate things.

AppDomain.CurrentDomain
    .GetAssemblies()
    .SelectMany(x => x.GetTypes())
    .FirstOrDefault(t => t.Name == "MyTypeName");

Use Where instead of FirstOrDefault to get all the results.

0
0

Simple Cached version

Do this once....

        nameTypeLookup = typeof(AnyTypeWithin_SomeNamespace).Assembly
            .DefinedTypes.Where(t => t.DeclaringType == null)
            .ToDictionary(k => k.Name, v => v);

Usage - lookup many times via dictionary

nameTypeLookup["TheClass"];
2
  • This is elegant and reusable, and met my usage needs best compared to other answers (which also would've worked). Not sure why you got downvotes, because this a) works and b) is elegant / simple / concise if you want to load Types by their short name rather than the rather lengthy AssemblyQualifiedName, and you want to scope within your own specific assembly by anchoring to a known type that won't go away, such as the main table/entity in your ORM/EM. – Tim Apr 27 at 15:54
  • Additionally, in my implementation of your answer, I can just say this.GetType().Assembly... without grabbing some other type, as my class that refers to other classes by short name is in the same assembly as the target classes. return this.GetType().Assembly.DefinedTypes.First(t => t.Name == ClassName); – Tim Apr 27 at 17:46
-2

That's the parameter the method expect to get, so no. You can not.

typeName: type name qualified by its namespace.

MSDN

How do you expect to distinguish between two classes with the same name but different Namespace?

namespace one
{
    public class TheClass
    {
    }
}

namespace two
{
    public class TheClass
    {
    }
}

Type.GetType("TheClass") // Which?!
12
  • 4
    @NIleshLanke, I hope you realize that Microsoft didn't design the .NET framework according to your needs but it was architected to be used in a much more broader scenarios. Like for example a scenario where you have the same class name in two different namespaces. – Darin Dimitrov Feb 14 '12 at 8:45
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    @gdoron, why the insistence in this post that it can't be don't when the accepted answer is showing that it can be? – user924069 Jul 11 '15 at 17:32
  • 3
    @gdoron, No, you don't. The answer above literally shows you how to do it. – user924069 Jul 24 '15 at 21:25
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    @gdoron, You need to look at what the user is actually after and not just the literal meaning of the question title. Its like me asking if I can drink a watermelon and you just replying "you can NOT", but then Fr33dan comes along and says "You can if you dice it up and throw it in a Nutribullet" - which is what I'm actually after. I think it is safe to say the user in this case just wanted some way to get the type without having to specify the namespace. – Bracher Jun 27 '16 at 15:46
  • 3
    @gdoron, read this stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer especially the section regarding "Answer the question" – Bracher Jul 18 '16 at 7:22

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