This question already has an answer here:

I would like to get info about a device to see if it's a smartphone or tablet. How can I do it?

I would like to show different web pages from resources based on the type of device:

String s="Debug-infos:";
s += "\n OS Version: " + System.getProperty("os.version") + "(" +    android.os.Build.VERSION.INCREMENTAL + ")";
s += "\n OS API Level: " + android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK;
s += "\n Device: " + android.os.Build.DEVICE;
s += "\n Model (and Product): " + android.os.Build.MODEL + " ("+ android.os.Build.PRODUCT + ")";

However, it seems useless for my case.


This solution works for me now:

DisplayMetrics metrics = new DisplayMetrics();
getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(metrics);
int width = metrics.widthPixels;
int height = metrics.heightPixels;

if (SharedCode.width > 1023 || SharedCode.height > 1023){
   //code for big screen (like tablet)
}else{
   //code for small screen (like smartphone)
}

marked as duplicate by Jorgesys android Sep 24 '14 at 23:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • using displaymetris get your screen size and do it. – Padma Kumar Feb 14 '12 at 15:01
  • 2
    Find the screensize is the only way. You can't really think of it in terms of "smartphone" and "tablet". In the end, screensize is what you want anyway. – DeeV Feb 14 '12 at 15:02
  • are your differences only layout-based? or do you plan to give completely different contents? Multiple layouts and Activities vs. Fragments are your way. – STT LCU Feb 16 '12 at 8:30
  • 1
    Using physical pixels is a horrible idea, as devices are getting more and more pixel-dense. At least you should use dp as unit. – cprcrack Dec 17 '14 at 12:19
up vote 661 down vote accepted

This subject is discussed in the Android Training:

Use the Smallest-width Qualifier

If you read the entire topic, they explain how to set a boolean value in a specific value file (as res/values-sw600dp/attr.xml):

<resources>
    <bool name="isTablet">true</bool>
</resources>

Because the sw600dp qualifier is only valid for platforms above android 3.2. If you want to make sure this technique works on all platforms (before 3.2), create the same file in res/values-xlarge folder:

<resources>
    <bool name="isTablet">true</bool>
</resources>

Then, in the "standard" value file (as res/values/), you set the boolean to false:

<resources>
    <bool name="isTablet">false</bool>
</resources>

Then in you activity, you can get this value and check if you are running in a tablet size device:

boolean tabletSize = getResources().getBoolean(R.bool.isTablet);
if (tabletSize) {
    // do something
} else {
    // do something else
}
  • 24
    brilliant answer ;) – Krishna Prasad Jun 27 '12 at 6:26
  • 21
    WICKED ANSWER:) – Arif Nadeem Jul 31 '12 at 11:07
  • 7
    This answer is good but possibly a bit dated since values-xlarge is now being deprecated.Using /res/values and /res/values-sw600 as the folders to store these values in may be a better solution. sw600 means "smallest width 600". If the size of the smallest dimension of the screen is greater than or equal to 600dp, the value in that folder will be chosen. A good reference for values and layout buckets (folders) is here: android-developers.blogspot.com/2012/07/…. – javahead76 Feb 26 '13 at 17:11
  • 7
    this may not work as effective any more as many smartphones now have minimum width>600, for example Samsung galaxy s3 which has min width of 720 pixels, thanks to the ever increasing pixel density. – user1938357 Sep 15 '13 at 14:26
  • 19
    @user1938357 note the "dp" in the "sw600dp", this means that this does not compare to real pixels but to density independent pixels. So although S3 has 720px, it still has way less then 600dp. – Sabo Dec 22 '13 at 11:37

I consider a tablet to have at least a 6.5 inch screen. This is how to compute it, based on Nolf's answer above.

DisplayMetrics metrics = new DisplayMetrics();
getActivity().getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(metrics);

float yInches= metrics.heightPixels/metrics.ydpi;
float xInches= metrics.widthPixels/metrics.xdpi;
double diagonalInches = Math.sqrt(xInches*xInches + yInches*yInches);
if (diagonalInches>=6.5){
    // 6.5inch device or bigger
}else{
    // smaller device
}
  • Flexible answer – Smit Patel Aug 25 '14 at 11:14
  • 1
    I am happy it was helpfull to you – gtsouk Aug 26 '14 at 11:36
  • 1
    That's the solution I use. Only thing is that threshold value should be a bit higher now (2015: big smartphones and also Phablet): I use 6.5 inches and above for Tablet. – Pascal May 28 '15 at 7:58
  • 1
    @Pascal Yes you are right. At the time of writing (a year ago) most phones where smaller than 5''. But now 6.5'' sounds more reasonable. I updated my answer. – gtsouk May 28 '15 at 14:39
  • 1
    Not working for me. I gives 4.89 for 10 inch Nexus 10 and 5.88 for 5 inch Galaxy S2. – Aawaz Gyawali Aug 10 '15 at 14:16

My assumption is that when you define 'Mobile/Phone' you wish to know whether you can make a phone call on the device which cannot be done on something that would be defined as a 'Tablet'. The way to verify this is below. If you wish to know something based on sensors, screen size, etc then this is really a different question.

Also, while using screen resolution, or the resource managements large vs xlarge, may have been a valid approach in the past new 'Mobile' devices are now coming with such large screens and high resolutions that they are blurring this line while if you really wish to know phone call vs no phone call capability the below is 'best'.

TelephonyManager manager = (TelephonyManager)context.getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
        if(manager.getPhoneType() == TelephonyManager.PHONE_TYPE_NONE){
            return "Tablet";
        }else{
            return "Mobile";
        }
  • 7
    Problem with this approach is that some telephony devices may have large screen – user210504 Oct 18 '12 at 19:54
  • 5
    Given the influx of phone-tabs, I used a combination of the two solutions. True = tablet, false = not TelephonyManager manager = (TelephonyManager) activity.getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE); /*if no telephony, it's a tablet. Otherwise, chack boolean file*/ boolean tablet = manager.getPhoneType() == TelephonyManager.PHONE_TYPE_NONE || activity.getResources().getBoolean(R.bool.isTablet); – Randy Mar 12 '13 at 2:26
  • 6
    I just tried that with a Samsung Tab 7 and it returns PHONE_TYPE_GSM. I guess because of the SIM-card module init. So absolutely not reliable. – ohcibi Dec 17 '13 at 11:10
  • Did you test it on a phone (handset device) without a SIM card in it? – Khulja Sim Sim Apr 24 '14 at 19:44
  • Not future proof. Breaks as soon as someone makes a tablet that can make calls. – atreat Oct 10 '14 at 19:21

I like Ol_v_er's solution and it's simplicity however, I've found that it's not always that simple, what with new devices and displays constantly coming out, and I want to be a little more "granular" in trying to figure out the actual screen size. One other solution that I found here by John uses a String resource, instead of a boolean, to specify the tablet size. So, instead of just putting true in a /res/values-sw600dp/screen.xml file (assuming this is where your layouts are for small tablets) you would put:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
  <string name="screen_type">7-inch-tablet</string>
</resources>

Reference it as follows and then do what you need based on the result:

String screenType = getResources().getString(R.string.screen_type);
if (screenType.equals("7-inch-tablet")) {
    // do something
} else {
    // do something else
}

Sean O'Toole's answer for Detect 7 inch and 10 inch tablet programmatically was also what I was looking for. You might want to check that out if the answers here don't allow you to be as specific as you'd like. He does a great job of explaining how to calculate different metrics to figure out what you're actually dealing with.

UPDATE

In looking at the Google I/O 2013 app source code, I ran across the following that they use to identify if the device is a tablet or not, so I figured I'd add it. The above gives you a little more "control" over it, but if you just want to know if it's a tablet, the following is pretty simple:

public static boolean isTablet(Context context) {
    return (context.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout
            & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK)
            >= Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE;
}
  • Your isTablet solution is e.g. not working on a Emulator with API 18 and Nexus 7 1200 x 1920 xhdpi ! – Ingo Oct 13 '14 at 5:23
  • @Ingo Not sure what you mean by not working, but I just fired up a test project using Eclipse and Android Studio and it worked correctly for both on a Nexus 7 1200 x 1920: xhdpi AVD. Are you getting errors in the IDE? Does the app compile? Does isTablet return false? What values are returned for the SCREENLAYOUT sizes? How are you calling isTablet? You really don't have any info that allows someone to try to help you. If you're really stuck, you might try posting an actual question with code examples so it will be easier to help. – Jason Oct 18 '14 at 2:16
  • Yes "isTablet(Context context)" returns false. Did you use API 18? – Ingo Oct 20 '14 at 2:46
  • Yes, I used API 18, sorry I left that out. I had compileSDKVersion and targetSDKVersion set to 21 in Android studio and both set to 18 in Eclipse. I'd make sure those are both set to at least 18. minSDKVersion was set to 18 for both as well. I would suggest that you post a question with example code if you need additional help. – Jason Oct 21 '14 at 3:47
  • 1
    Doesn't work in Nexus 5 – SweetWisher ツ May 5 '16 at 8:49

Since tablet are in general bigger than smartphones and since a low res tablet may have the same number of pixels as a high res smartphone, one way to solve this is to calculate the physical SIZE (not resolution) of a device:

    DisplayMetrics metrics = new DisplayMetrics();
    getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(metrics);

    float yInches= metrics.heightPixels/metrics.ydpi;
    float xInches= metrics.widthPixels/metrics.xdpi;

   if (yInches> smallestTabletSize|| xInches > smallestTabletSize)
    {
                  //We are on a 
    }
  • did you tested it with what promising values of smallestTabletSize – nmxprime Apr 23 '14 at 4:09
  • Nice answer. I extended it a bit, calculating the screen diagonal. Anything above 5inches i consider a tablet. Read my answer below. – gtsouk Jul 11 '14 at 15:21

The best option I found and the less intrusive, is to set a tag param in your xml, like

PHONE XML LAYOUT

<android.support.v4.view.ViewPager xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/pager"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:tag="phone"/>

TABLET XML LAYOUT

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/pager"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:tag="tablet">

    ...

</RelativeLayout>

and then call this in your activity class:

View viewPager = findViewById(R.id.pager);
Log.d(getClass().getSimpleName(), String.valueOf(viewPager.getTag()));

Hope it works for u.

I use this method in all my apps, and it works successfully:

public static boolean isTablet(Context ctx){    
    return (ctx.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK) >= Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE; 
}
  • This solution is e.g. not working on a Emulator with API 18 and Nexus 7 1200 x 1920 xhdpi ! – Ingo Oct 13 '14 at 5:22
  • Hey, one of my testing devices is a Nexus 7 and works perfect, Im wondering why isn[t working on your Emulator. >` – Jorgesys Oct 13 '14 at 14:43
  • I dont know what is wrong in your code. But I have tested on Emulator and the result of "isTablet(Context ctx) was false. Try by self on Emulator. – Ingo Oct 13 '14 at 15:59
  • It's decrepated. That's why. – António Paulo Mar 16 '16 at 15:13
  • Are you sure that this is deprecated? do you have info about it? import android.content.res.Configuration; I have targetSDK = 21 and it Works. – Jorgesys Mar 16 '16 at 15:16

The solution that I use is to define two layouts. One with the layout folder set to for example layout-sw600dp I use this to provide a menu button for my tablet users and to hide this for the phone users. That way I do not (yet) have to implement the ActionBar for my existing apps ...

See this post for more details.

Re: the tangent above on how to tell a phone from a non-phone: as far as I know, only a phone has a 15-digit IMEI (International Mobile Station Equipment Identity), so the following code will definitively distinguish a phone from a non-phone:

    TelephonyManager manager = (TelephonyManager) this.getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
    String deviceInfo = "";
    deviceInfo += manager.getDeviceId(); // the IMEI
    Log.d(TAG, "IMEI or unique ID is " + deviceInfo);

    if (manager.getDeviceId() == null) {
        Log.d(TAG, "This device is NOT a phone");
    } else {
        Log.d(TAG, "This device is a phone.");
    }

I have found that on a Nook emulator getPhoneType() returns a phoneType of "GSM" for some reason, so it appears checking for phone type is unreliable. Likewise, getNetworkType() will return 0 for a phone in airplane mode. In fact, airplane mode will cause getLine1Number() and the getSim* methods to return null too. But even in airplane mode, the IMEI of a phone persists.

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