466

I've been searching for a "lightbox" type solution that allows this but haven't found one yet (please, suggest if you know of any).

The behavior I'm trying to recreate is just like what you'd see at Pinterest when clicking on an image. The overlay is scrollable (as in the whole overlay moves up like a page on top of a page) but the body behind the overlay is fixed.

I attempted to create this with just CSS (i.e. a div overlay on top of the whole page and body with overflow: hidden), but it doesn't prevent div from being scrollable.

How to keep the body/page from scrolling but keep scrolling inside the fullscreen container?

  • isnt this just an "overlay" plugin like hundrets out there using position fixed with overflow-y scroll ? – ggzone Feb 14 '12 at 16:17
  • 4
    Link to Pinterest doesn't help, as its content is behind a login wall. – 2540625 Jun 10 '15 at 2:54
  • 5
    2017 Update: even if you do log in to Pinterest, what you find is that the overlay effect described in the OP no longer exists - instead when you click on an image you just navigate to an ordinary page displaying a large version of the image. – Annabel Nov 23 '17 at 0:48

19 Answers 19

645

Theory

Looking at current implementation of the pinterest site (it might change in the future), when you open the overlay a noscroll class is applied to the body element and overflow: hidden is set, thus body is no longer scrollable.

The overlay (created on-the-fly or already inside the page and made visible via display: block, it makes no difference) has position : fixed and overflow-y: scroll, with top, left, right and bottom properties set to 0: this style makes the overlay fill the whole viewport.

The div inside the overlay is instead just in position: static then the vertical scrollbar you see is related to that element. As a result the content is scrollable but overlay remains fixed.

When you close the zoom you hide the overlay (via display: none) and then you could also entirely remove it via javascript (or just the content inside, it's up to you how to inject it).

As a final step you have to also remove the noscroll class to the body (so the overflow property returns to its initial value)


Code

Codepen Example

(it works by changing the aria-hidden attribute of the overlay in order to show and hide it and to increase its accessibility).

Markup
(open button)

<button type="button" class="open-overlay">OPEN LAYER</button>

(overlay and close button)

<section class="overlay" aria-hidden="true">
  <div>
    <h2>Hello, I'm the overlayer</h2>
    ...   
    <button type="button" class="close-overlay">CLOSE LAYER</button>
  </div>
</section>

CSS

.noscroll { 
  overflow: hidden;
}

.overlay { 
   position: fixed; 
   overflow-y: scroll;
   top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; }

[aria-hidden="true"]  { display: none; }
[aria-hidden="false"] { display: block; }

Javascript (vanilla-JS)

var body = document.body,
    overlay = document.querySelector('.overlay'),
    overlayBtts = document.querySelectorAll('button[class$="overlay"]');

[].forEach.call(overlayBtts, function(btt) {

  btt.addEventListener('click', function() { 

     /* Detect the button class name */
     var overlayOpen = this.className === 'open-overlay';

     /* Toggle the aria-hidden state on the overlay and the 
        no-scroll class on the body */
     overlay.setAttribute('aria-hidden', !overlayOpen);
     body.classList.toggle('noscroll', overlayOpen);

     /* On some mobile browser when the overlay was previously
        opened and scrolled, if you open it again it doesn't 
        reset its scrollTop property */
     overlay.scrollTop = 0;

  }, false);

});

Finally, here's another example in which the overlay opens with a fade-in effect by a CSS transition applied to the opacity property. Also a padding-right is applied to avoid a reflow on the underlying text when the scrollbar disappears.

Codepen Example (fade)

CSS

.noscroll { overflow: hidden; }

@media (min-device-width: 1025px) {
    /* not strictly necessary, just an experiment for 
       this specific example and couldn't be necessary 
       at all on some browser */
    .noscroll { 
        padding-right: 15px;
    }
}

.overlay { 
     position: fixed; 
     overflow-y: scroll;
     top: 0; left: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0;
}

[aria-hidden="true"] {    
    transition: opacity 1s, z-index 0s 1s;
    width: 100vw;
    z-index: -1; 
    opacity: 0;  
}

[aria-hidden="false"] {  
    transition: opacity 1s;
    width: 100%;
    z-index: 1;  
    opacity: 1; 
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    This is the correct answer. Someone should give it a check mark as it is correct. – Scoota P Feb 14 '12 at 21:11
  • 65
    This is absolutely correct, but be warned, it doesn't work in mobile safari. The background will continue to scroll and your overlay will be fixed. – a10s Apr 27 '12 at 17:33
  • 21
    It works fine. Scrollable viewport container div must have CSS style position:fixed, and have vertical overflow scrollable. I successfully used overflow-y:auto; and for iOS momentum/inertia scrolling, I added -webkit-overflow-scrolling:touch; to the CSS. I used display:block;, width:100%;, and height:100%; CSS to have a full-page viewport. – Slink Jun 23 '14 at 16:32
  • 10
    Sorry, I do not understand. Setting the body to overflow: hidden does not disable the elastic body scrolling on my iPad iOS7. So I had to add within my js: document.body.addEventListener( 'touchmove', function(event) {event.preventDefault();}, false ); which SADLY disables all elements from being scrollable, too. Have not found any solution so far (without extra plugIns) – Garavani Sep 4 '14 at 7:12
  • 22
    If the user has already scrolled the body down to bottom when the overlay is activated, this will cause the body to jump up to top when you set overflow: hidden; Any way around this? – Björn Andersson Apr 7 '15 at 14:17
78

If you want to prevent overscrolling on ios, you can add position fixed to your .noscroll class

body.noscroll{
    position:fixed;
    overflow:hidden;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 112
    With this solution, because of the fixed position, the body will automatically scroll to the top of your content. This could be disturbing for your users. – tzi Jul 2 '14 at 12:21
  • 5
    Another problem with using position:fixed is that it was resizing my main body. Maybe it was conflicting with other CSS, but overflow:hidden is all that was needed – Dex Jul 17 '14 at 19:56
  • 3
    this is breaking focus jumping when you tab through input fields – Atav32 Jul 17 '15 at 18:42
  • @Atav32 Sounds like a seperate issue, position and overflow should not be effecting tab order. – am80l Aug 26 '15 at 9:18
  • @am80l sorry my previous comment was super vague: the tab order works find, but the screen jolts when you tab through fields on iOS Safari (stackoverflow.com/questions/31126330/…) – Atav32 Aug 26 '15 at 17:19
49

overscroll-behavior css property allows to override the browser's default overflow scroll behavior when reaching the top/bottom of content.

Just add the following styles to overlay:

.overlay {
   overscroll-behavior: contain;
   ...
}

Codepen demo

Currently works in Chrome, Firefox and IE(caniuse)

For more details check google developers article.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    I have come all the way to tell you that this is working on latest Chrome, Mozilla and Opera. Have a wonderful time! – Wannabe JavaGeek Mar 6 '18 at 19:44
  • 3
    Someone should add a bounty on this. This is the correct solution. No JavaScript necessary. :) – joseph.l.hunsaker Aug 24 '18 at 5:14
  • 15
    Problem with this solution is that it only works if overlay is scrollable. If you have a modal and it all fit on screen so there is no scroll inside — it will not stop the body scroll. That and it also doesn't work in Safari at all :) – waterplea Mar 15 '19 at 7:03
  • 1
    I settled with a combination of this with overflow-y: scroll (from your Codepen demo). The point raised by @pokrishka is valid, but in my case it's not a concern. In any case, I wonder if the browsers' implementations are going to cover this detail in the future. I found that, in Firefox, resizing the browser so that the modal does not fit the screen and then resizing it again so that it does makes this property work (i.e. scroll is contained) even after resizing to full size - until the page is reloaded, at least. – Marc.2377 May 2 '19 at 17:15
47

Don't use overflow: hidden; on body. It automatically scrolls everything to the top. There's no need for JavaScript either. Make use of overflow: auto;. This solution even works with mobile Safari:

HTML Structure

<div class="overlay">
    <div class="overlay-content"></div>
</div>

<div class="background-content">
    lengthy content here
</div>

Styling

.overlay{
    position: fixed;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8);

    .overlay-content {
        height: 100%;
        overflow: scroll;
    }
}

.background-content{
    height: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
}

See the demo here and source code here.

Update:

For people who want keyboard space bar, page up/down to work: you need to focus on the overlay, e.g., clicking on it, or manually JS focusing on it before this part of the div will respond to keyboard. Same with when the overlay is "switched off", since it's just moving the overlay to the side. Otherwise to browser, these are just two normal divs and it wouldn't know why it should focus on any one of them.

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    cool solution, but then i need to wrap all of my content in a div, which i had no intention of doing... – Jacob Raccuia Sep 3 '15 at 0:07
  • 2
    This is an ideal solution. If anyone is having trouble with this, you might need to add html, body { height: 100%; } (as in the demo) for this to work correctly. – John Sep 18 '15 at 16:07
  • 4
    @user18490 the angular/material part has nothing to do with the fact that this solution is working. – Lucia Sep 24 '15 at 15:22
  • 10
    This breaks mobile devices UX in a number of ways (ie: URL-bar Hiding, Overscroll Affordance, ...), even the spacebar to scroll on desktops. – nitely Dec 14 '15 at 20:20
  • 2
    This is the more robust option, but it does complicate things a bit. For instance, PageUp and PageDown won't work on refresh. anything that uses the .offset() values for calculation gets messed up, etc... – BlackPanther Jul 27 '16 at 18:05
37

Most solutions have the problem that they do not retain the scroll position, so I took a look at how Facebook does it. In addition to setting the underlaying content to position: fixed they also set the top dynamically to retain the scroll position:

scrollPosition = window.pageYOffset;
mainEl.style.top = -scrollPosition + 'px';

Then, when you remove the overlay again, you need to reset the scroll position:

window.scrollTo(0, scrollPosition);

I created a little example to demonstrate this solution

let overlayShown = false;
let scrollPosition = 0;

document.querySelector('.toggle').addEventListener('click', function() {
  if (overlayShown) {
		showOverlay();
  } else {
    removeOverlay();
  }
  overlayShown = !overlayShown;
});

function showOverlay() {
    scrollPosition = window.pageYOffset;
  	const mainEl = document.querySelector('.main-content');
    mainEl.style.top = -scrollPosition + 'px';
  	document.body.classList.add('show-overlay');
}

function removeOverlay() {
		document.body.classList.remove('show-overlay');
  	window.scrollTo(0, scrollPosition);
    const mainEl = document.querySelector('.main-content');
    mainEl.style.top = 0;
}
.main-content {
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient( lime, blue 103px);
  width: 100%;
  height: 200vh;
}

.show-overlay .main-content {
  position: fixed;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  overflow-y: scroll; /* render disabled scroll bar to keep the same width */
}

.overlay {
  display: none;
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3);
  overflow: auto;
}

.show-overlay .overlay {
  display: block;
}

.overlay-content {
  margin: 50px;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient( grey, grey 20px, black 20px, black 40px);
  height: 120vh;
}

.toggle {
  position: fixed;
  top: 5px;
  left: 15px;
  padding: 10px;
  background: red;
}

/* reset CSS */
body {
  margin: 0;
}
<main class="main-content"></main>

  <div class="overlay">
    <div class="overlay-content"></div>
  </div>
  
  <button class="toggle">Overlay</button>

| improve this answer | |
  • This seems to be the most elegant solution to me. I know Google employs the same tricks of scrolling the page and moving elements often. – forallepsilon Jul 3 '18 at 19:41
  • This is the one and only solution that worked 100% correct for me, I wish I found this answer earlier. – user0103 Jul 16 '19 at 18:24
31

It is worth noting that sometimes adding "overflow:hidden" to the body tag doesn't do the job. In those cases, you'll have to add the property to the html tag as well.

html, body {
    overflow: hidden;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • For iOS, you need to also set width: 100%; height: 100%; – Gavin Nov 24 '16 at 16:57
  • 2
    This doesn't address a problem also seen in many of the other solutions for this question—if the window is scrolled anywhere but the top of the page when the modal is open, it will cause a scroll to the top of the page. I found Philipp Mitterer's solution here to be the best option that covers most cases. – CLL Feb 17 '18 at 21:58
  • 1
    I have never experienced this issue you speak of (on either web or mobile). Could you share the full code (with DOM) that doesn't work in a fiddle or jsbin? In any case, I am wary of using Javascript workarounds to tackle this issue. – Francisco Hodge Mar 19 '18 at 20:49
7

Generally speaking, if you want a parent (the body in this case) to prevent it from scrolling when a child (the overlay in this case) scrolls, then make the child a sibling of the parent to prevent the scroll event from bubbling up to the parent. In case of the parent being the body, this requires an additional wrapping element:

<div id="content">
</div>
<div id="overlay">
</div>

See Scroll particular DIV contents with browser's main scrollbar to see its working.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Best solution, true "out of the box" thinking, just not so well phrased. – Mark May 4 '16 at 6:01
  • If the body isn't the element that scrolls, than topbars won't slide up on mobile as you scroll down into the page. – Seph Reed Sep 27 '19 at 20:40
7

The chosen answer is correct, but has some limitations:

  • Super hard "flings" with your finger will still scroll <body> in the background
  • Opening the virtual keyboard by tapping an <input> in the modal will direct all future scrolls to <body>

I don't have a fix for the first issue, but wanted to shed some light on the second. Confusingly, Bootstrap used to have the keyboard issue documented, but they claimed it was fixed, citing http://output.jsbin.com/cacido/quiet as an example of the fix.

Indeed, that example works fine on iOS with my tests. However, upgrading it to the latest Bootstrap (v4) breaks it.

In an attempt to figure out what the difference between them was, I reduced a test case to no longer depend on Bootstrap, http://codepen.io/WestonThayer/pen/bgZxBG.

The deciding factors are bizarre. Avoiding the keyboard issue seems to require that background-color is not set on the root <div> containing the modal and the modal's content must be nested in another <div>, which can have background-color set.

To test it, uncomment the below line in the Codepen example:

.modal {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  z-index: 2;
  display: none;
  overflow: hidden;
  -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch;
  /* UNCOMMENT TO BREAK */
/*   background-color: white; */
}
| improve this answer | |
4

For touch devices, try adding a 1px wide, 101vh min-height transparent div in the wrapper of the overlay. Then add -webkit-overflow-scrolling:touch; overflow-y: auto; to the wrapper. This tricks mobile safari into thinking the overlay is scrollable, thus intercepting the touch event from the body.

Here's a sample page. Open on mobile safari: http://www.originalfunction.com/overlay.html

https://gist.github.com/YarGnawh/90e0647f21b5fa78d2f678909673507f

| improve this answer | |
  • Jup, that did the trick. Just had to add -webkit-overflow-scrolling:touch; for each scrollable container to intercept touch events. – Mati Sep 27 '16 at 7:37
  • I am still able to scroll on iPhone – Simone Zandara Feb 24 '17 at 14:21
  • @SeniorSimoneZandara I'm not. this works fine to prevent background scroll – godblessstrawberry Feb 27 '18 at 7:34
4

The behaviour you want to prevent is called scroll chaining. To disable it, set

overscroll-behavior: contain;

on your overlay in CSS.

| improve this answer | |
3

I found this question trying to solve issue I had with my page on Ipad and Iphone - body was scrolling when I was displaying fixed div as popup with image.

Some answers are good, however none of them solved my issue. I found following blog post by Christoffer Pettersson. Solution presented there helped issue I had with iOS devices and it helped my scrolling background problem.

Six things I learnt about iOS Safari's rubber band scrolling

As it was suggested I include major points of the blog post in case link gets outdated.

"In order to disable that the user can scroll the background page while the "menu is open", it is possible to control what elements should be allowed to be scrolled or not, by applying some JavaScript and a CSS class.

Based on this Stackoverflow answer you can control that elements with the disable-scrolling should not perform their default scroll action when the touchmove event is triggered."

 document.ontouchmove = function ( event ) {

    var isTouchMoveAllowed = true, target = event.target;

    while ( target !== null ) {
        if ( target.classList && target.classList.contains( 'disable-scrolling' ) ) {
            isTouchMoveAllowed = false;
            break;
        }
        target = target.parentNode;
    }

    if ( !isTouchMoveAllowed ) {
        event.preventDefault();
    }
};

And then put the disable-scrolling class on the page div:

<div class="page disable-scrolling">
| improve this answer | |
2

If the intent is to disable on mobile/ touch devices then the most straightforward way to do it is using touch-action: none;.

Example:

const app = document.getElementById('app');
const overlay = document.getElementById('overlay');

let body = '';

for (let index = 0; index < 500; index++) {
  body += index + '<br />';
}

app.innerHTML = body;
app.scrollTop = 200;

overlay.innerHTML = body;
* {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

html,
body {
  height: 100%;
}

#app {
  background: #f00;
  position: absolute;
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
  overflow-y: scroll;
  line-height: 20px;
}

#overlay {
  background: rgba(0,0,0,.5);
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  height: 100%;
  padding: 0 0 0 100px;
  overflow: scroll;
}
<div id='app'></div>
<div id='overlay'></div>

(The example does not work in the context of Stack Overflow. You will need to recreate it in a stand-alone page.)

If you want to disable scrolling of the #app container, just add touch-action: none;.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    If touch action actually worked on iOS that is. And in that case there'd be no need to wrap your entire "app" in a separate div. – powerbuoy Dec 5 '17 at 18:57
2

You can easily do this with some "new" css and JQuery.

Initially: body {... overflow:auto;} With JQuery you can dynamically switch between 'overlay' and 'body'. When on 'body', use

body {
   position: static;
   overflow: auto;
}

When on 'overlay' use

body {
   position: sticky;
   overflow: hidden;
}

JQuery for the switch('body'->'overlay'):

$("body").css({"position": "sticky", "overflow": "hidden"});

JQuery for the switch('overlay'->'body'):

$("body").css({"position": "static", "overflow": "auto"});
| improve this answer | |
1

I'd like to add to previous answers because I tried to do that, and some layout broke as soon as I switched the body to position:fixed. In order to avoid that, I had to also set body's height to 100% :

function onMouseOverOverlay(over){
    document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0].style.overflowY = (over?"hidden":"scroll");
    document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].style.position = (over?"fixed":"static");
    document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].style.height = (over?"100%":"auto");
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Use the following HTML:

<body>
  <div class="page">Page content here</div>
  <div class="overlay"></div>
</body>

Then JavaScript to intercept and stop scrolling:

$(".page").on("touchmove", function(event) {
  event.preventDefault()
});

Then to get things back to normal:

$(".page").off("touchmove");

| improve this answer | |
0

try this

var mywindow = $('body'), navbarCollap = $('.navbar-collapse');    
navbarCollap.on('show.bs.collapse', function(x) {
                mywindow.css({visibility: 'hidden'});
                $('body').attr("scroll","no").attr("style", "overflow: hidden");
            });
            navbarCollap.on('hide.bs.collapse', function(x) {
                mywindow.css({visibility: 'visible'});
                $('body').attr("scroll","yes").attr("style", "");
            });
| improve this answer | |
-1

In my case, none of these solutions worked out on iPhone (iOS 11.0).

The only effective fix that is working on all my devices is this one - ios-10-safari-prevent-scrolling-behind-a-fixed-overlay-and-maintain-scroll-position

| improve this answer | |
-1

If you want to stop body/html scroll add as the following

CSS

    html, body {
        height: 100%;
    }

    .overlay{
        position: fixed;
        top: 0px;
        left: 0px;
        right: 0px;
        bottom: 0px;
        background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8);

        .overlay-content {
            height: 100%;
            overflow: scroll;
        }
    }

    .background-content{
        height: 100%;
        overflow: auto;
    }

HTML

    <div class="overlay">
        <div class="overlay-content"></div>
    </div>

    <div class="background-content">
        lengthy content here
    </div>

Basically, you could do it without JS.

The main idea is to add html/body with height: 100% and overflow: auto. and inside your overlay, you could either enable/disable scroll based on your requirement.

Hope this helps!

| improve this answer | |
-2

Use below code for disabling and enabling scroll bar.

Scroll = (
    function(){
          var x,y;
         function hndlr(){
            window.scrollTo(x,y);
            //return;
          }  
          return {

               disable : function(x1,y1){
                    x = x1;
                    y = y1;
                   if(window.addEventListener){
                       window.addEventListener("scroll",hndlr);
                   } 
                   else{
                        window.attachEvent("onscroll", hndlr);
                   }     

               },
               enable: function(){
                      if(window.removeEventListener){
                         window.removeEventListener("scroll",hndlr);
                      }
                      else{
                        window.detachEvent("onscroll", hndlr);
                      }
               } 

          }
    })();
 //for disabled scroll bar.
Scroll.disable(0,document.body.scrollTop);
//for enabled scroll bar.
Scroll.enable();
| improve this answer | |

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