69

I'm looking to do a little custom validation with JSR-303 javax.validation.

I have a field. And If a certain value is entered into this field I want to require that a few other fields are not null.

I'm trying to figure this out. Not sure exactly what I would call this to help find an explanation.

Any help would be appreciated. I am pretty new to this.

At the moment I'm thinking a Custom Constraint. But I'm not sure how to test the value of the dependent field from within the annotation. Basically I'm not sure how to access the panel object from the annotation.

public class StatusValidator implements ConstraintValidator<NotNull, String> {

    @Override
    public void initialize(NotNull constraintAnnotation) {}

    @Override
    public boolean isValid(String value, ConstraintValidatorContext context) {
        if ("Canceled".equals(panel.status.getValue())) {
            if (value != null) {
                return true;
            }
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

It's the panel.status.getValue(); giving me trouble.. not sure how to accomplish this.

87

In this case I suggest to write custom validator, which will validate at class level (to allow us get access to object's fields) that one field is required only if another field has particular value. Note that you should write generic validator which gets 2 field names and work with only these 2 fields. To require more than one field you should add this validator for each field.

Use the following code as an idea (I've not test it).

  • Validator interface

    /**
     * Validates that field {@code dependFieldName} is not null if
     * field {@code fieldName} has value {@code fieldValue}.
     **/
    @Target({TYPE, ANNOTATION_TYPE})
    @Retention(RUNTIME)
    @Constraint(validatedBy = NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValueValidator.class)
    @Documented
    public @interface NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue {
    
        String fieldName();
        String fieldValue();
        String dependFieldName();
    
        String message() default "{NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue.message}";
        Class<?>[] groups() default {};
        Class<? extends Payload>[] payload() default {};
    
        @Target({TYPE, ANNOTATION_TYPE})
        @Retention(RUNTIME)
        @Documented
        @interface List {
            NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue[] value();
        }
    
    }
    
  • Validator implementation

    /**
     * Implementation of {@link NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue} validator.
     **/
    public class NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValueValidator
        implements ConstraintValidator<NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue, Object> {
    
        private String fieldName;
        private String expectedFieldValue;
        private String dependFieldName;
    
        @Override
        public void initialize(NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue annotation) {
            fieldName          = annotation.fieldName();
            expectedFieldValue = annotation.fieldValue();
            dependFieldName    = annotation.dependFieldName();
        }
    
        @Override
        public boolean isValid(Object value, ConstraintValidatorContext ctx) {
    
            if (value == null) {
                return true;
            }
    
            try {
                String fieldValue       = BeanUtils.getProperty(value, fieldName);
                String dependFieldValue = BeanUtils.getProperty(value, dependFieldName);
    
                if (expectedFieldValue.equals(fieldValue) && dependFieldValue == null) {
                    ctx.disableDefaultConstraintViolation();
                    ctx.buildConstraintViolationWithTemplate(ctx.getDefaultConstraintMessageTemplate())
                        .addNode(dependFieldName)
                        .addConstraintViolation();
                        return false;
                }
    
            } catch (NoSuchMethodException | InvocationTargetException | IllegalAccessException ex) {
                throw new RuntimeException(ex);
            }
    
            return true;
        }
    
    }
    
  • Validator usage example

    @NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue.List({
        @NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue(
            fieldName = "status",
            fieldValue = "Canceled",
            dependFieldName = "fieldOne"),
        @NotNullIfAnotherFieldHasValue(
            fieldName = "status",
            fieldValue = "Canceled",
            dependFieldName = "fieldTwo")
    })
    public class SampleBean {
        private String status;
        private String fieldOne;
        private String fieldTwo;
    
        // getters and setters omitted
    }
    

Note that validator implementation uses BeanUtils class from commons-beanutils library but you could also use BeanWrapperImpl from Spring Framework.

See also this great answer: Cross field validation with Hibernate Validator (JSR 303)

  • This will only work with strings – Ben Jun 8 '17 at 11:42
  • @Benedictus This example will only work with strings but you can modify it to work with any objects. There are 2 ways: 1) parametrize validator with class that you want to validate (instead of Object). In this case, you even don't need to use reflection for getting the values but in this case validator become less generic 2) use BeanWrapperImp from Spring Framework (or other libraries) and its getPropertyValue() method. In this case you will be able to get a value as Object and cast to any type that you need. – Slava Semushin Jun 8 '17 at 15:10
  • Yeah, but you can't have Object as annotation parameter, So you'll need a bunch of different annotations for each type you want to validate. – Ben Jun 8 '17 at 15:21
  • 1
    Yes, that what I mean when I said "in this case validator become less generic". – Slava Semushin Jun 8 '17 at 22:04
79

Define method that must validate to true and put the @AssertTrue annotation on the top of it:

  @AssertTrue
  private boolean isOk() {
    return someField != something || otherField != null;
  }

The method must start with 'is'.

  • I used your method and it works, but I can't figure out how to get the message. Would you happen to know? – anaBad Jul 28 '16 at 9:03
  • 7
    This was by far the most efficient of options. Thanks! @anaBad: The AssertTrue annotation can take a custom message, just as other constraint annotations. – ernest_k Aug 1 '16 at 7:11
  • @ErnestKiwele Thanks for answering, but my problem isn't with setting the message but getting it in my jsp. I have the following function the model: @AssertTrue(message="La reference doit etre un URL") public boolean isReferenceOk() { return origine!=Origine.Evolution||reference.contains("http://jira.bcaexpertise.org"); } And this in my jsp: <th><form:label path="reference"><s:message code="reference"/></form:label></th><td><form:input path="reference" cssErrorClass="errorField"/><br/><form:errors path="isReferenceOk" cssClass="error"/></td> But it throws an error. – anaBad Aug 1 '16 at 9:39
  • @ErnestKiwele Never mind I figured it out, I made a boolean attribute that is set when setReference() is called. – anaBad Aug 1 '16 at 11:34
  • 1
    i had to make the method public – tibi Mar 7 '18 at 12:59
13

You should make use of custom DefaultGroupSequenceProvider<T>:

ConditionalValidation.java

// Marker interface
public interface ConditionalValidation {}

MyCustomFormSequenceProvider.java

public class MyCustomFormSequenceProvider
    implements DefaultGroupSequenceProvider<MyCustomForm> {

    @Override
    public List<Class<?>> getValidationGroups(MyCustomForm myCustomForm) {

        List<Class<?>> sequence = new ArrayList<>();

        // Apply all validation rules from ConditionalValidation group
        // only if someField has given value
        if ("some value".equals(myCustomForm.getSomeField())) {
            sequence.add(ConditionalValidation.class);
        }

        // Apply all validation rules from default group
        sequence.add(MyCustomForm.class);

        return sequence;
    }
}

MyCustomForm.java

@GroupSequenceProvider(MyCustomFormSequenceProvider.class)
public class MyCustomForm {

    private String someField;

    @NotEmpty(groups = ConditionalValidation.class)
    private String fieldTwo;

    @NotEmpty(groups = ConditionalValidation.class)
    private String fieldThree;

    @NotEmpty
    private String fieldAlwaysValidated;


    // getters, setters omitted
}

See also related question on this topic.

  • Interesting way of doing it. The answer could do with more explanation of how it works, though, because I had to read it twice before I saw what was going on... – Jules May 12 '17 at 23:34
  • Hi, I implemented your solution but facing an issue. No object is being passed to the getValidationGroups(MyCustomForm myCustomForm) method. Could you possibly help here? : stackoverflow.com/questions/44520306/… – user238607 Jul 17 '17 at 19:25
  • 1
    @user238607 getValidationGroups(MyCustomForm myCustomForm) will call many time per bean instance and it some time pass null. You just do ignore if it pass null. – pramoth Mar 28 '18 at 7:21
6

Here's my take on it, tried to keep it as simple as possible.

The interface:

@Target({TYPE, ANNOTATION_TYPE})
@Retention(RUNTIME)
@Constraint(validatedBy = OneOfValidator.class)
@Documented
public @interface OneOf {

    String message() default "{one.of.message}";

    Class<?>[] groups() default {};

    Class<? extends Payload>[] payload() default {};

    String[] value();
}

Validation implementation:

public class OneOfValidator implements ConstraintValidator<OneOf, Object> {

    private String[] fields;

    @Override
    public void initialize(OneOf annotation) {
        this.fields = annotation.value();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isValid(Object value, ConstraintValidatorContext context) {

        BeanWrapper wrapper = PropertyAccessorFactory.forBeanPropertyAccess(value);

        int matches = countNumberOfMatches(wrapper);

        if (matches > 1) {
            setValidationErrorMessage(context, "one.of.too.many.matches.message");
            return false;
        } else if (matches == 0) {
            setValidationErrorMessage(context, "one.of.no.matches.message");
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    private int countNumberOfMatches(BeanWrapper wrapper) {
        int matches = 0;
        for (String field : fields) {
            Object value = wrapper.getPropertyValue(field);
            boolean isPresent = detectOptionalValue(value);

            if (value != null && isPresent) {
                matches++;
            }
        }
        return matches;
    }

    private boolean detectOptionalValue(Object value) {
        if (value instanceof Optional) {
            return ((Optional) value).isPresent();
        }
        return true;
    }

    private void setValidationErrorMessage(ConstraintValidatorContext context, String template) {
        context.disableDefaultConstraintViolation();
        context
            .buildConstraintViolationWithTemplate("{" + template + "}")
            .addConstraintViolation();
    }

}

Usage:

@OneOf({"stateType", "modeType"})
public class OneOfValidatorTestClass {

    private StateType stateType;

    private ModeType modeType;

}

Messages:

one.of.too.many.matches.message=Only one of the following fields can be specified: {value}
one.of.no.matches.message=Exactly one of the following fields must be specified: {value}
3

A different approach would be to create a (protected) getter that returns an object containing all dependent fields. Example:

public class MyBean {
  protected String status;
  protected String name;

  @StatusAndSomethingValidator
  protected StatusAndSomething getStatusAndName() {
    return new StatusAndSomething(status,name);
  }
}

StatusAndSomethingValidator can now access StatusAndSomething.status and StatusAndSomething.something and make a dependent check.

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