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I have a baseclass, Statement, which several other classes inherit from, named IfStatement, WhereStatement, etc... What is the best way to perform a test in an if statement to determine which sort of Statement class an instance is derived from?

63
if (obj.getClass().isInstance(Statement.class)) {
   doStuffWithStatements((Statement) obj));
}

The nice thing about this technique (as opposed to the "instanceof" keyword) is that you can pass the test-class around as an object. But, yeah, other than that, it's identical to "instanceof".

NOTE: I've deliberately avoided editorializing about whether or not type-instance-checking is the right thing to do. Yeah, in most cases, it's better to use polymorphism. But that's not what the OP asked, and I'm just answering his question.

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  • 3
    Why not just use the simpler instanceof check? – Steve Kuo May 29 '09 at 23:46
  • 5
    instanceof is not evil like goto. There is a reason it was added to the language and why it has not been deprecated. – David Taylor May 30 '09 at 1:33
  • 11
    +1 for not "editorializing about whether or not type-instance-checking is the right thing to do" – Viktor Dahl Mar 18 '11 at 13:35
77
if(object instanceof WhereStatement) {
   WhereStatement where = (WhereStatement) object;
   doSomething(where);
}

Note that code like this usually means that your base class is missing a polymorphic method. i.e. doSomething() should be a method of Statement, possibly abstract, that is overridden by sub-classes.

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  • Thanks for the additional info! I'll look into it to see if there is a clean way to improve the design. – Heat Miser May 29 '09 at 23:32
  • 5
    +1 for the answer, though I would add that instanceof has plenty of valid uses - it's not always a design smell. For example, if doSomething() is only ever applicable to where clauses then this pattern is probably better than artificially making doSomething() part of the Statement class (where it doesn't logically fit). – mikera Oct 1 '12 at 6:53
  • Another example of where instanceof is useful. In JavaFX, you have a Pane. I need to traverse the tree of child nodes. getChildren() returns Nodes. But if one of the nodes is a Pane, I need to traverse its children too. Node doesn't have a getChildren() method and isn't mine to add one to. So I have to use node instanceof Pane to see if I need to cast the Node to a Pane and traverse its children. – dwilliss Nov 30 '14 at 15:56
6

The answer to your question is instanceof.

However, keep in mind that if your code needs instanceof, it's a sign that something is not right with your design. There are some cases when instanceof is justified, but they are rather exceptions. Usually, if your subclasses need to behave differently, you have to use polymorphism instead of if()s.

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  • The only thing I would add to your commend is the strong suggestion of programming by interface. – monksy Oct 8 '09 at 5:36
2

isAssignableFrom(java.lang.Class) from class is your answer.

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1

Try this:

if (Statement.class.isInstance(obj)) {
    doStuffWithStatements((Statement) obj));
}

since Class.isInstance() method takes an object instance as a parameter.

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0

This is not the way to do things in an object-oriented way, it's a throwback to the old code/data dichotomy. Now that's not necessarily a bad thing (if you know what you're doing) but it should be left to the non-object-oriented languages like C.

With proper design, you don't need that sort of behavior. Instead of the construct:

if (obj.getClass().isInstance(Statement.class)) {
    doStuffWithStatements((Statement) obj));
}

(apologies to benjismith for 'stealing' his code), you should really be making the object itself responsible for its own activities thus:

obj.doStuff();

Then each different obj class will have its own definition for doStuff. That is the right way to do it.

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  • If only a sub-class can doStuff (™paxdiabio) and you have an array of objects some of which are a super class of the sub-class then this is the better way to do it (rather than add no-op'd doStuff methods to the super-class(es) which may be meaningless (or "just wrong")). – geowar Feb 13 '17 at 18:52
  • @geowar, if you have a collection of non-homogeneous things, they probably shouldn't be in the collection. Or, at a minimum, you shouldn't be iterating over that collection in a way that wants to doStuff. There are various ways to handle this but tying it to the class name or type can be very problematic when making changes. In the inheritance/OO world, having a null function for the superclass that wants to do nothing for this case is actually quite a valid solution, making the processing code much cleaner. – paxdiablo Feb 15 '17 at 2:21

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