I'm trying to convert one range of numbers to another, maintaining ratio. Maths is not my strong point.

I have an image file where point values may range from -16000.00 to 16000.00 though the typical range may be much less. What I want to do is compress these values into the integer range 0-100, where 0 is the value of the smallest point, and 100 is the value of the largest. All points in between should keep a relative ratio even though some precision is being lost I'd like to do this in python but even a general algorithm should suffice. I'd prefer an algorithm where the min/max or either range can be adjusted (ie, the second range could be -50 to 800 instead of 0 to 100).

  • Thank you both, I'm giving the answer to cletus because he got in first and a +1 to jerry for answering my followup. – SpliFF May 30 '09 at 7:35
  • 1
    actual sorry cletus, i'm giving it to jerry because he's new and needs the points. – SpliFF May 30 '09 at 7:36
  • 1
    Hey that's ageism! Heheh, j/k, no worries. :) – cletus May 30 '09 at 7:52
  • 5
    How did this question escape the stackoverflow question closers brigade? ;) – thanikkal Oct 15 '15 at 19:38

13 Answers 13

up vote 386 down vote accepted
NewValue = (((OldValue - OldMin) * (NewMax - NewMin)) / (OldMax - OldMin)) + NewMin

Or a little more readable:

OldRange = (OldMax - OldMin)  
NewRange = (NewMax - NewMin)  
NewValue = (((OldValue - OldMin) * NewRange) / OldRange) + NewMin

Or if you want to protect for the case where the old range is 0 (OldMin = OldMax):

OldRange = (OldMax - OldMin)
if (OldRange == 0)
    NewValue = NewMin
else
{
    NewRange = (NewMax - NewMin)  
    NewValue = (((OldValue - OldMin) * NewRange) / OldRange) + NewMin
}

Note that in this case we're forced to pick one of the possible new range values arbitrarily. Depending on context, sensible choices could be: NewMin (see sample), NewMax or (NewMin + NewMax) / 2

  • does oldMax have to be 16000 or can it be the highest value in the old point set (say, 15034.00, for example) is the distinction important? – SpliFF May 30 '09 at 6:30
  • 5
    You can make it anything you want... keep in mind that you may get strange results if one of the ranges is very small relative to the other one (not exactly sure, but if there's more than a 1000000 factor difference between the size of the ranges, make sure that it actually behaves like you expect... or learn about floating point inaccuracy) – jerryjvl May 30 '09 at 6:39
  • 2
    Considering the popularity of this answer, for a more general case you should consider OldMax == OldMin possibility, that could result in a division by zero. – user May 4 '14 at 13:01
  • also here in C# [habitualcode.com/post/2010/10/10/… – m1m1k Aug 18 '15 at 21:18
  • @buffer @jerryjvl OldMax == OldMin should be treated as exception (raise Exception("OldRange is Zero") not as NewValue = NewMin. The (main) purpose of the code doing the original work is blurred. – Kuldeep Singh Dhaka Jan 12 '16 at 7:33

That's a simple linear conversion.

new_value = ( (old_value - old_min) / (old_max - old_min) ) * (new_max - new_min) + new_min

So converting 10000 on the scale of -16000 to 16000 to a new scale of 0 to 100 yields:

old_value = 10000
old_min = -16000
old_max = 16000
new_min = 0
new_max = 100

new_value = ( ( 10000 - -16000 ) / (16000 - -16000) ) * (100 - 0) + 0
          = 81.25
  • 2
    This is wrong. You need to subtract Old Min from Old Value before the divide. – SPWorley May 30 '09 at 5:54
  • 24
    Um, I am ...... – cletus May 30 '09 at 5:56

Actually there are some cases that above answers would break. Such as wrongly input value, wrongly input range, negative input/output ranges.

def remap( x, oMin, oMax, nMin, nMax ):

    #range check
    if oMin == oMax:
        print "Warning: Zero input range"
        return None

    if nMin == nMax:
        print "Warning: Zero output range"
        return None

    #check reversed input range
    reverseInput = False
    oldMin = min( oMin, oMax )
    oldMax = max( oMin, oMax )
    if not oldMin == oMin:
        reverseInput = True

    #check reversed output range
    reverseOutput = False   
    newMin = min( nMin, nMax )
    newMax = max( nMin, nMax )
    if not newMin == nMin :
        reverseOutput = True

    portion = (x-oldMin)*(newMax-newMin)/(oldMax-oldMin)
    if reverseInput:
        portion = (oldMax-x)*(newMax-newMin)/(oldMax-oldMin)

    result = portion + newMin
    if reverseOutput:
        result = newMax - portion

    return result

#test cases
print remap( 25.0, 0.0, 100.0, 1.0, -1.0 ), "==", 0.5
print remap( 25.0, 100.0, -100.0, -1.0, 1.0 ), "==", -0.25
print remap( -125.0, -100.0, -200.0, 1.0, -1.0 ), "==", 0.5
print remap( -125.0, -200.0, -100.0, -1.0, 1.0 ), "==", 0.5
#even when value is out of bound
print remap( -20.0, 0.0, 100.0, 0.0, 1.0 ), "==", -0.2

There is a condition, when all of the values that you are checking are the same, where @jerryjvl's code would return NaN.

if (OldMin != OldMax && NewMin != NewMax):
    return (((OldValue - OldMin) * (NewMax - NewMin)) / (OldMax - OldMin)) + NewMin
else:
    return (NewMax + NewMin) / 2

I didn't dig up the BNF for this, but the Arduino documentation had a great example of the function and it's breakdown. I was able to use this in Python by simply adding a def renaming to remap (cause map is a built-in) and removing the type casts and curly braces (ie just remove all the 'long's).

Original

long map(long x, long in_min, long in_max, long out_min, long out_max)
{
  return (x - in_min) * (out_max - out_min) / (in_max - in_min) + out_min;
}

Python

def remap(x, in_min, in_max, out_min, out_max):
  return (x - in_min) * (out_max - out_min) / (in_max - in_min) + out_min

https://www.arduino.cc/en/reference/map

In the listing provided by PenguinTD, I do not understand why the ranges are reversed, it works without having to reverse the ranges. Linear range conversion is based upon the linear equation Y=Xm+n, where m and n are derived from the given ranges. Rather than refer to the ranges as min and max, it would be better to refer to them as 1 and 2. So the formula would be:

Y = (((X - x1) * (y2 - y1)) / (x2 - x1)) + y1

Where Y=y1 when X=x1, and Y=y2 when X=x2. x1, x2, y1 & y2 can be given any positive or negative value. Defining the expression in a macro makes it more useful,it can then be used with any argument names.

#define RangeConv(X, x1, x2, y1, y2) (((float)((X - x1) * (y2 - y1)) / (x2 - x1)) + y1)

The float cast would ensure floating point division in the case where all the arguments are integer values. Depending on the application it may not be necessary to check the ranges x1=x2 and y1==y2.

  • Thanks! here is C# conversion: float RangeConv(float input, float x1, float x2, float y1, float y2) { return (((input - x1) * (y2 - y1)) / (x2 - x1)) + y1; } – Zunair Jul 15 '16 at 12:57

PHP Port

Found PenguinTD's solution helpful so I ported it to PHP. Help yourself!

/**
* =====================================
*              Remap Range            
* =====================================
* - Convert one range to another. (including value)
*
* @param    int $intValue   The value in the old range you wish to convert
* @param    int $oMin       The minimum of the old range
* @param    int $oMax       The maximum of the old range
* @param    int $nMin       The minimum of the new range
* @param    int $nMax       The maximum of the new range
*
* @return   float $fResult  The old value converted to the new range
*/
function remapRange($intValue, $oMin, $oMax, $nMin, $nMax) {
    // Range check
    if ($oMin == $oMax) {
        echo 'Warning: Zero input range';
        return false;
    }

    if ($nMin == $nMax) {
        echo 'Warning: Zero output range';
        return false;
    }

    // Check reversed input range
    $bReverseInput = false;
    $intOldMin = min($oMin, $oMax);
    $intOldMax = max($oMin, $oMax);
    if ($intOldMin != $oMin) {
        $bReverseInput = true;
    }

    // Check reversed output range
    $bReverseOutput = false;
    $intNewMin = min($nMin, $nMax);
    $intNewMax = max($nMin, $nMax);
    if ($intNewMin != $nMin) {
        $bReverseOutput = true;
    }

    $fRatio = ($intValue - $intOldMin) * ($intNewMax - $intNewMin) / ($intOldMax - $intOldMin);
    if ($bReverseInput) {
        $fRatio = ($intOldMax - $intValue) * ($intNewMax - $intNewMin) / ($intOldMax - $intOldMin);
    }

    $fResult = $fRatio + $intNewMin;
    if ($bReverseOutput) {
        $fResult = $intNewMax - $fRatio;
    }

    return $fResult;
}

I used this solution in a problem I was solving in js, so I thought I would share the translation. Thanks for the explanation and solution.

function remap( x, oMin, oMax, nMin, nMax ){
//range check
if (oMin == oMax){
    console.log("Warning: Zero input range");
    return None;
};

if (nMin == nMax){
    console.log("Warning: Zero output range");
    return None
}

//check reversed input range
var reverseInput = false;
oldMin = Math.min( oMin, oMax );
oldMax = Math.max( oMin, oMax );
if (oldMin != oMin){
    reverseInput = true;
}

//check reversed output range
var reverseOutput = false;  
newMin = Math.min( nMin, nMax )
newMax = Math.max( nMin, nMax )
if (newMin != nMin){
    reverseOutput = true;
};

var portion = (x-oldMin)*(newMax-newMin)/(oldMax-oldMin)
if (reverseInput){
    portion = (oldMax-x)*(newMax-newMin)/(oldMax-oldMin);
};

var result = portion + newMin
if (reverseOutput){
    result = newMax - portion;
}

return result;
}
  • thank you! awesome solution and set as a function ready to go! – Fight Fire With Fire Feb 16 '15 at 2:47

C++ Variant

I found PenguinTD's Solution usefull, so i ported it to C++ if anyone needs it:

float remap(float x, float oMin, float oMax, float nMin, float nMax ){

//range check
if( oMin == oMax) {
    //std::cout<< "Warning: Zero input range";
    return -1;    }

if( nMin == nMax){
    //std::cout<<"Warning: Zero output range";
    return -1;        }

//check reversed input range
bool reverseInput = false;
float oldMin = min( oMin, oMax );
float oldMax = max( oMin, oMax );
if (oldMin == oMin)
    reverseInput = true;

//check reversed output range
bool reverseOutput = false;  
float newMin = min( nMin, nMax );
float newMax = max( nMin, nMax );
if (newMin == nMin)
    reverseOutput = true;

float portion = (x-oldMin)*(newMax-newMin)/(oldMax-oldMin);
if (reverseInput)
    portion = (oldMax-x)*(newMax-newMin)/(oldMax-oldMin);

float result = portion + newMin;
if (reverseOutput)
    result = newMax - portion;

return result; }

Here's some short Python functions for your copy and paste ease, including a function to scale an entire list.

def scale_number(unscaled, to_min, to_max, from_min, from_max):
    return (to_max-to_min)*(unscaled-from_min)/(from_max-from_min)+to_min

def scale_list(l, to_min, to_max):
    return [scale_number(i, to_min, to_max, min(l), max(l)) for i in l]

Which can be used like so:

scale_list([1,3,4,5], 0, 100)

[0.0, 50.0, 75.0, 100.0]

In my case I wanted to scale a logarithmic curve, like so:

scale_list([math.log(i+1) for i in range(5)], 0, 50)

[0.0, 21.533827903669653, 34.130309724299266, 43.06765580733931, 50.0]

Short-cut/simplified proposal

 NewRange/OldRange = Handy multiplicand or HM
 Convert OldValue in OldRange to NewValue in NewRange = 
 (OldValue - OldMin x HM) + NewMin

wayne

  • What is NewRange/OldRange here? – Zunair Jul 15 '16 at 13:01

I personally use the helper class which supports generics (Swift 3 compatible)

struct Rescale<Type : BinaryFloatingPoint> {
    typealias RescaleDomain = (lowerBound: Type, upperBound: Type)

    var fromDomain: RescaleDomain
    var toDomain: RescaleDomain

    init(from: RescaleDomain, to: RescaleDomain) {
        self.fromDomain = from
        self.toDomain = to
    }

    func interpolate(_ x: Type ) -> Type {
        return self.toDomain.lowerBound * (1 - x) + self.toDomain.upperBound * x;
    }

    func uninterpolate(_ x: Type) -> Type {
        let b = (self.fromDomain.upperBound - self.fromDomain.lowerBound) != 0 ? self.fromDomain.upperBound - self.fromDomain.lowerBound : 1 / self.fromDomain.upperBound;
        return (x - self.fromDomain.lowerBound) / b
    }

    func rescale(_ x: Type )  -> Type {
        return interpolate( uninterpolate(x) )
    }
}

This example converts a songs current position into an angle range of 20 - 40.

    /// <summary>
    /// This test converts Current songtime to an angle in a range. 
    /// </summary>
    [Fact]
    public void ConvertRangeTests()
    {            
       //Convert a songs time to an angle of a range 20 - 40
        var result = ConvertAndGetCurrentValueOfRange(
            TimeSpan.Zero, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5.4),
            20, 40, 
            2.7
            );

        Assert.True(result == 30);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the current value from the mixValue maxValue range.        
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="startTime">Start of the song</param>
    /// <param name="duration"></param>
    /// <param name="minValue"></param>
    /// <param name="maxValue"></param>
    /// <param name="value">Current time</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public double ConvertAndGetCurrentValueOfRange(
                TimeSpan startTime,
                TimeSpan duration,
                double minValue,
                double maxValue,
                double value)
    {
        var timeRange = duration - startTime;
        var newRange = maxValue - minValue;
        var ratio = newRange / timeRange.TotalMinutes;
        var newValue = value * ratio;
        var currentValue= newValue + minValue;
        return currentValue;
    }

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