96

Are there situations where it is appropriate to use a try-finally block without a catch block?

1
  • 2
    On MSDN, see try-finally (C# Reference). Note that the article refers to the combined use of try and finally as the "try-finally statement."
    – DavidRR
    Mar 24, 2016 at 13:00

11 Answers 11

144

You would use it to ensure some actions occur after the try content or on an exception, but when you don't wish to consume that exception.

Just to be clear, this doesn't hide exceptions. The finally block is run before the exception is propagated up the call stack.

You would also inadvertently use it when you use the using keyword, because this compiles into a try-finally (not an exact conversion, but for argument's sake it is close enough).

try
{
    TrySomeCodeThatMightException();
}
finally
{
    CleanupEvenOnFailure();
}

Code running in finally is not guaranteed to run, however the case where it isn't guaranteed is fairly edge - I can't even remember it. All I remember is, if you are in that case, chances are very good that not running the finally isn't your biggest problem :-) so basically don't sweat it.

Update from Tobias: finally will not run if the process is killed.

Update from Paddy: Conditions when finally does not execute in a .net try..finally block

The most prevalent example you may see is disposing of a database connection or external resource even if the code fails:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection("")) // Ignore the fact we likely use ORM ;-)
{
    // Do stuff.
}

Compiles into something like:

SqlConnection conn;

try
{
    conn = new SqlConnection("");
    // Do stuff.
}
finally
{
    if (conn != null)
        conn.Dispose();
}
8
  • 18
    @AnthonyBlake The exception isn't hidden. If an exception occurred, it would run the finally and then propagate the exception back up the call stack. Feb 15, 2012 at 10:22
  • 2
    As for the edge case, the finally won't run if the process is killed (with "terminate process" in the task manager or because of a power outage, for example).
    – Nuffin
    Feb 15, 2012 at 10:42
  • 1
    More information here about when a finally statement will not fire - not just when process is killed: stackoverflow.com/questions/111597/…
    – Paddy
    Feb 15, 2012 at 11:20
  • 1
    Another obvious case where not all of the finally will run is if an error happens in the midst of the finally block. Feb 15, 2012 at 12:28
  • 2
    Finally will not be called in three scenarios I can think of: Killing the process, stack overflow, and out of memory. All of these basically halt execution of the program at the exact point they are encountered and signal the OS to terminate the process.
    – KeithS
    Feb 15, 2012 at 15:33
6

Good Explaination using code:

void MyMethod1()
{
    try
    {
        MyMethod2();
        MyMethod3();
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        //do something with the exception
    }
}


void MyMethod2()
{
    try
    {
        //perform actions that need cleaning up
    }
    finally
    {
        //clean up
    }
}


void MyMethod3()
{
    //do something
}

If either MyMethod2 or MyMethod3 throws an exception, it will be caught by MyMethod1. However, the code in MyMethod2 needs to run clean up code, e.g. closing a database connection, before the exception is passed to MyMethod1.

http://forums.asp.net/t/1092267.aspx?Try+without+Catch+but+with+finally+doesn+t+throw+error+Why+no+syntax+error+

1
  • 2
    Ann example of this 'clean-up' could be saveLogFile(), which I often want to put at the very end of a program no matter what.
    – Vincent
    Oct 29, 2017 at 19:51
5

using is equivalent try-finally. You will only use try-finally when you want to do some clean up inside finally and don't care about the exception.

The best approach will be

try
{
   using(resource)
   {
       //Do something here
   }   
}catch(Exception)
{
     //Handle Error
}

Doing so even clean up called by using fails, your code will not fail.

There are some condition when finally will not get executed.

  • If there is any StackOverflowException or ExecutingEngineException.
  • Process is killed from external source.

Hope this answers your doubt.

3

If you have, for example an unmanaged resource you create and use in the try block, you can use the finally block to ensure you release that resource. The finally block will always be executed despite what happens (e.g. exceptions) in the try block.

E.g. the lock(x) statement is really:

System.Threading.Monitor.Enter(x); 
try { ... } 
finally 
{ 
    System.Threading.Monitor.Exit(x); 
} 

The finally block will always get called to ensure the exclusive lock is released.

1

You need a finally block, when no matter which (if any) exceptions are caught or even if none are caught you still want to execute some code before the block exits. For instance, you might want to close an open file.

See Also try-finally

1

try/finally: when you do not want to handle any exceptions but want to ensure some action(s) occur whether or not an exception is thrown by called code.

1

I don't know anything about C#, but it seems that anything you could do with a try-finally, you could more elegantly do with a using statement. C++ doesn't even have a finally as a result of its RAII.

11
  • Not necessarily. What if you want to run some custom code that isn't handled by simple disposing. For instance, if you increase a counter in the try, then decrease it in a finally, you can't do that in a using statement. Oct 30, 2020 at 4:51
  • @MarkA.Donohoe Can you not create a object that holds a reference to the counter, which it decrements when it is disposed?
    – Neil G
    Oct 30, 2020 at 6:26
  • Yes, but why create an entire object just to implement a disposable interface to use with the using statement? That's fitting the problem to the solution. A Try-[Catch]-Finally handles all of that without having to create such an object. Oct 30, 2020 at 6:37
  • @MarkA.Donohoe The object solution is superior because it implements a bracketing pattern in one place. You cannot forget, misplace, or accidentally delete the decrementation code.
    – Neil G
    Oct 30, 2020 at 6:44
  • I'm sorry, but I disagree. You're focusing on explicit decrementing behavior, but who said they had to be perfectly matched? What if there is other increment/decrement logic that also depends on other members in the function? Plus, you're now not only introducing a new object just for one use, but you're doing so on the heap instead of a simple int on the stack. There is definitely a time and a place to use using but you can't make the blanket statement like you have. Again, that's defining the problem by the solution, which to me is backwards. Oct 30, 2020 at 6:56
1

Here is a situation where you might want to use try finally: when you would normally use a using statement, but can't because you are calling a method by reflection.

This won't work

using (objMsg  =  Activator.CreateInstance(TypeAssist.GetTypeFromTypeName("omApp.MessagingBO")))
{

}

instead use

           object objMsg = null;
            try
            {
                objMsg
                   = Activator.CreateInstance(TypeAssist.GetTypeFromTypeName("myAssembly.objBO"));

                strResponse = (string)objMsg.GetType().InvokeMember("MyMethod", BindingFlags.Public
                        | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, objMsg,
                        new object[] { vxmlRequest.OuterXml });
            }               
            finally
            {
                if (objMsg!=null)
                    ((IDisposable)objMsg).Dispose();
            }
0

Have a look at the following link: https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/131397/why-use-try-finally-without-a-catch-clause

It depends on the architecture of your application and the operation you are performing in the block.

0

Here's a use case that I always (uhm..) use:

int? x; //note the nullable type here!
try
{
    x = int.Parse(someString);
}
catch { } //don't care, let it just be null
0

1.we can use the try block without catch but we should use the catch/finally, any one of them. 2.We can't use only try block.

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